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Summary:

Nothing like a hard dose of reality, administered by data. On Wednesday morning, media advisory Oliver & Ohlbaum bombarded guests at a brief…

Nothing like a hard dose of reality, administered by data. On Wednesday morning, media advisory Oliver & Ohlbaum bombarded guests at a briefing event with facts and analysis that give a fascinating numerical snapshot of where media businesses stand in the digital age.

Here are some of the highlights O&O founder and CEO Mark Oliver passed on…

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The internet’s not growing the overall advertising pot: “The long-term trend since 2002 is still broken and suggests advertisers are trying to save money (online), not put more money in to advertising. The internet offers more accountability, which is why the press has suffered so much.”

An upturn’s not good news for everyone: “The recovery is likely to see a continual shift in to direct internet marketing and e-commerce activity, rather than media.”

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The Long Tail is more of a rat’s tail…” Only one in 12 UK reality TV shows is a hit (two thirds flop), only one in 10 UK movies make £300,000, only one in eight UK TV dramas make it to season five.”

This is essentially an Indian Summer for traditional media – by 2013/14, the structural factors will dawn again. It will recover to a new industry structure.”

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Top tip for the future? “Move to a multiplatform offering. People who need to get value from a one-price product – those days are over – all areas of media and internet will become multiplatform.

TV is likely to be one of the last truly mass-media experiences across platforms. TV’s importance in the media mix may increase – use of TV by other media will become increasingly important.”

Ian Hargreaves’ upcoming review of intellectual property law: “It may sound boring, but the fair use framework will become a vital issue.”

  1. “Only one in 12 UK reality TV shows is a hit (two thirds flop), only one in 10 UK movies make £300,000, only one in eight UK TV dramas make it to season five.”

    Where did this data come from? What’s the definition of a ‘hit’ and a ‘flop’ in reality TV? Shows can be a ‘flop’ and still make money for the producer. He implies 1 in 8 UK dramas making it to season 5 is bad…Is it? How many were only meant to be 1 or 2 seasons long? What’s the ratio in the US that make it to season 5?

    This comes across as sloppy metrics with no context.

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