Summary:

»  As Comcast’s Steve Burke prepares to run the show at NBC Universal (NYSE: GE) after the merger is finalized, changing the way a…

Morning Lowdown
photo: Corbis / Patricia Curi

»  As Comcast’s Steve Burke prepares to run the show at NBC Universal (NYSE: GE) after the merger is finalized, changing the way advertising is bought, sold and experienced will be one of his biggest jobs. [AdAge]

»  After a year as the head of IAC’s branded content production studio Electus, Ben Silverman is enjoying new found freedom after his tenure at NBCU, which included putting Jay Leno on at 10PM. These days, he’s making deals left and right with companies such as Yahoo (NSDQ: YHOO), AOL (NYSE: AOL), MySpace (NSDQ: NWS) and Facebook and VH1. As a result, he may be helping to elevate online video. [Mediaweek]

»  Despite Salon.com’s progress on the revenue front this past year, the company is unable to completely arrest its losses. As a result, CEO Richard Gringas is considering merging with another media company or accepting acquisition offers. [WSJ]

»  News Corp’s Rupert Murdoch may once have predicted that his Dow Jones and WSJ would crush the FT, but the salmon-colored Peason-owned newspaper is actually thriving thanks to rising subscriptions boosted by its metered paywall guarded website and mobile apps. [Crains NY Business]

»  The major ad holding companies like Omnicom, WPP IPG and Publicis may often be portrayed as relics of the Mad Men era in the face of nimble digital firms which are altering the concept of what an ad agency does, but rumors of their demise have been greatly exaggerated — especially as the recovery of ad spending continues into next year. [Bloomberg BusinessWeek]

»  The Association of Magazine Media, which changed its name from the Magazine Publishers of America earlier this year to appear less print-centric, has a new ad campaign that attacks the cold, unfeeling nature of reading on devices as opposed to the warmth of “curling up” with ink and paper. The tone is quite different from the previous campaigns which simply sought to portray physical magazines in a strong light. [NYT]

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