Summary:

A footnote to the news that Symbian has been taken under Nokia’s control: come December 17, all of the websites run by the Symbian Foundatio…

Symbian Foundation Art
photo: Symbian

A footnote to the news that Symbian has been taken under Nokia’s control: come December 17, all of the websites run by the Symbian Foundation, including its blogs, and possibly also its Twitter feed and Facebook page, will be shut down, as the group winds down its day-to-day operations and transitions into a licensing body. Forum Nokia will become the main point of contact for developers in the future.

The sites affected include all of those hosted by the Symbian Foundation:

http://www.symbian.org, http://www.symbian.org/cn, http://www.symbian.org/jp
– developer.symbian.org, developer.symbian.org/cn, developer.symbian.org/jp, kernel.symbian.org
– horizon.symbian.org
– ideas.symbian.org
– blog.symbian.org, blogcn.symbian.org, blogjp.symbian.org

Symbian says that its Twitter feed and its Symbian.org fan page on Facebook are also likely to be discontinued. It has around 10,000 followers on Twitter, with another 3,900 on Facebook.

It notes that Symbian Signed will stay open for business. This is the site where developers go to get an app signed before deploying it across Symbian devices. Symbian communities hosted outside the Symbian Foundation are also not affected.

The sites, which were there primiarly for the developer community, contained data that included source code, kits, wiki, a bug database, reference documentation and Symbian Ideas (the last one is effectively a suggestion board for changes for future iterations of the OS). The message that details the closure notes that Symbian will still send this data to people, “most likely on a DVD or USB hard drive,” on request, although it will in future lack the real-time contributions of further data. Most of this content will not be available for distribution before the end of January 2011, and it encourages people to download what they need from the site now.

These moves should not come as a surprise after Symbian announced it would transition into a licensing body after Nokia (NYSE: NOK) assumed full control earlier this month. While it may save some operational costs to shutter some of these web properties, it seems like really the main reason for consolidating activity is for Nokia to be able to more closely align Symbian’s message and development with their own, and better control both going forward. We’ve reached out to Symbian for further clarification and will update when we hear back.

Comments have been disabled for this post