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Summary:

This week on the Net: Our NewTeeVee Live conference last week was apparently the epicenter for cord cutting activism, South Park allegedly stole music from YouTube and Netflix is possibly out to destroy Hulu. These news and many more adjectives in today’s Vid Biz.

Do Online Viewers Watch Less TV? New Poll’s Findings Might Surprise You; Nielsen thinks online viewers watch more linear TV, Evercore Partners calls NewTeeVee Live “the epicenter for cord cutting activism.” (The Hollywood Reporter)

Comcast’s Top Digital Exec Amy Banse to Open New Silicon Valley Equity Fund for Cable Giant and NBC; the president of Comcast Interactive Media is shifting into a job as head of a new Silicon Valley-based equity fund aimed at making digital investments for the television cable giant. (BoomTown)

‘South Park’ Sued for Stealing from YouTube; the producers of the animated hit, including Viacom and Comedy Central, are being sued for allegedly ripping off a copyrighted music video for the viral phenomenon What What (In the Butt). (THR, Esq.)

How to Sell on YouTube, Without Showing a Video; by making comments, companies can engage potential customers in conversation. (WSJ)

Netflix Unbound; Will burgeoning video force hasten Hulu’s demise? (Mediaweek)

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  1. Davis Freeberg Monday, November 15, 2010

    It’s not usually a very good practice to draw conclusions based on the antedoctal evidence of a few, so it’s hard to put much faith in Evercore’s observation that only 4% of the people at the NewTeeVee Conference raised their hands when asked if they had cut the cord. What makes this number even more misleading is that the audience for the NewTeeVee blog and the NewTeeVee conference is a little bit different. Don’t get me wrong, NewTeeVee did a great job with the conference and I’m sure that there are marketing opportunities for those in the industry, but the average cable subscriber will never be able to afford the fees to attend. Had they asked the same question to the online audience watching via Ustream (which NewTeeVee awesomely gave away for free) I bet the results would have been dramatically different. Since the conference audience was comprised of mostly higher net worth individuals, as well as individuals who make their living off the television universe in some way, it’s probably not all that surprising that cord cutters were underrepresented.

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