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Summary:

BitTorrent Inc. is announcing at NewTeeVee Live today that it is making its app platform available to all of its users. One of the first pieces of content featured on the platform is the movie Four Eyed Monsters, which is released in conjunction with VODO.net.

BitTorrent Inc. is announcing at NewTeeVee Live today that it is making its app platform available to all of its users, making it possible to access content, software downloads and online services like Twitter right within the company’s uTorrent client.

One of the first pieces of content featured on the platform is the movie Four Eyed Monsters, which is released in conjunction with VODO.net.

The 2005 movie chronicles an unconventional relationship between a filmmaker and an artist, and won several awards, including a South by Southwest Special Audience Award, as well as being featured as the first full-length movie available on YouTube. Filmmaker Arin Crumley told us that the duo made more than $55,000 through banner ads and a partnership with spout.com.

BitTorrent has been working on its app strategy ever since it launched the platform as part of uTorrent Labs in May. It extended apps to the 14 million users of its mainline client in September, and is now making these applications available to all of its 65 million users.

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  1. Hi,

    As a company, it’s dispapointing to see the lack of traction the company has yet to achieve, that might be down simply to the personnel and connections to the wider media eco-system – understandable considering the companies roots.

    However, most people should know that BitTorrent succeeded so much because it uses the same distribution design as the Internet, which wasn’t built for the web as it often is used today, and definately not for server-to-user tunneling or intensive broadcast, let alone live, video.

    I’d bet more than on others, that the brain that came up with BITTorrent can resolve a efficient design for live p2p video, though it’s still a challenging task. Not least in a market where it can cost just cents to push a Gb of content, and the further considerations of ISP-capping.

    What I’d urge them to do, once the technicals are finalised, is deep penetration via affiliates and hardware OEM’s; inclusion in an 80 million user client wouldn’t be a bad start.

    Kind regards,

    Shakir Razak

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