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Summary:

As Liam argued yesterday, Apple is aiming for the consumer market these days, which is why it should come as no surprise that it would discontinue its Xserve enterprise server. The rack-mountable Xserve will no longer be available as of Jan. 31.

xserve-eol

As Liam argued yesterday, Apple is aiming for the consumer market these days, which is why it should come as no surprise that it would discontinue its Xserve enterprise server. The rack-mountable Xserve will no longer be available for purchase as of Jan. 31, and Apple has no plans to produce a new model in the future.

Apple does assure customers that any Xserve already sold up until that day will be fully supported, however. So your warranties, AppleCare, etc. will all be taken care of. And for those customers concerned about not being able to use OS X to run their servers, Apple has some “transition options,” which it details in a .PDF released specifically to address the Xserve end-0f-life.

Cupertino offers either the Mac Pro or the Mac mini as viable alternatives for use as servers, when installed with Snow Leopard Server. In the document, Apple describes the advantages of each alternate setup, and even provides comparative performance benchmarks. The Mac Pro, it maintains, is more powerful than the Xserve, though it doesn’t support rack mounting, obviously, and it also draws more power.

The Mac mini, on the other hand, is laughably underpowered compared to the Xserve, though it can be made to work with server racks via third-party hardware brackets. And, it’s much much cheaper, obviously. Apple also points out that mini is in fact currently Apple’s most popular server option.

Xserve’s demise will probably come as a disappointment to a few dedicated enterprise and small business customers, but it’ll free up resources and time that Apple can then devote to its continued consumer market expansion. I certainly won’t miss it. Will you?

UPDATE: Apple now offers a “Server” configuration of its Mac Pro desktop, which includes one 2.8GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon processor, 8GB of RAM, two 1TB hard drives and an ATI Radeon HD 5770 graphics card with 1GB of dedicated RAM. It also comes with an unlimited-client license of Mac OS X Server.

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  1. … so they’re going to fill that huge datacenter with Mac Minis?

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    1. This really pisses me off. If they are leaving the market they should allow us to run OSX server on a Dell then legitmately. You can already run it in a VM no problem. What was the big move to incorporate a better push technology for iPhones for? Resoureces! What resources they basically enhanced open source software and placed a shinny GUI on it and made it Mac simple.

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      1. Iron that your handle is “PRETHOUGHT” since it appears that was lacking in your response.

        Nothing prevents you from running OS X Server on a Dell. Apple has chosen not to support that. You can now choose to spend your money elsewhere.

        Choice: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Choice

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      2. @Khürt

        It’s ironic that people do not review their comments prior to hitting the submit button.

        There is no option after January 31st for a rack mount machine running Snow Leopard Server as Apple has taken that choice away.

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      3. Khürt, that first sentence of your reply to PRETHOUGHT really was unnecessary and stupid.

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  2. When considering Mac Pro “servers” in a datacenter….simply equals a lot of wasted space. Not having a rack option is stupid.

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  3. Maybe the Mini is the most popular server because you can buy the 2.66GHz Mini with 1 TB onboard of 2 SATAII 500GB 7200RPM harddrives and 4GB RAM, and add a superdrive for less than specing up the same base mini with the same CPU and RAM, but still only have 1 500GB 5000RPM drive, and no factory option to go to the faster drives. Oh, and add some money if you need iLife. This is still way cheaper than the cheapest iMac, but more than the cheapest Macbook (again a single drive and no firewire on the plastic mac.
    But a Mac Mini is still no XServ when it come to repairing or replacing hotswap hardware.
    Maybe as Apple dont mind taking their primary web interface, the apps store down for updates, but others may choose to disagree.
    For servers though, you really arn’t going to be looking at them very often, so the style issue isnt relevant, but the XServ are actually very nice looking servers 8)

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