18 Comments

Summary:

HP has been teasing us with its on-again/off-again relationship with the HP Slate, but it’s on again with the official release of the Slate 500. The Slate 500 is aimed at the enterprise, with features not found in other Windows touch tablets, including pen support.

HP Slate 500 in dock

HP has been teasing us with its on-again/off-again relationship with the HP Slate, but it’s on again with the official release of the Slate 500. The Slate 500 is aimed at the enterprise crowd, with features not found in other Windows touch tablets. The 8.9-inch touch tablet packs an active digitizer, allowing for handwritten input and note-taking. The Slate 500 is available from HP for $799.

The Slate 500 has an Intel Atom Z540 (1.86 GHz) processor, 2 GB of RAM, a 64 GB SSD and a Broadcom Crystal HD Accelerator for handling HD video playback. The 8.9-inch screen features the N-Trig dual digitizer, for both multi-touch and pen input. The inclusion of pen support adds capability aimed at enterprise workers, although early reports indicate there is no palm rejection technology to allow resting the hand on the screen while writing with the pen. There is a 3 MP camera on the back of the tablet, and a second camera on the front for video conferencing.

HP is including two accessories for the Slate 500 in the $799 price, a portfolio case and a docking stand. The stand includes ports for peripherals, providing an easy way to connect the tablet to desktop peripherals. The HP Slate 500 is currently showing a shipping date of Nov. 11.

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  1. Um, oh, hmmm. I thought the whole point of an active digitizer screen was to use a special pen to work with the screen (like I used to do with my Compaq T1100 and my IBM X60 tablet). Am I misunderstanding?

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  2. Other sites have reported that it does have palm rejection (HP may not like that term), it is activated by the proximity of the pen, so if you lift the pen away from the screen repeatedly, you can end up with inadvertant touches – just take practice but is the necessary trade off for having touch and an active digitizer.

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    1. LOL @ “Palm Rejection” I’m going to laugh at that every time it pops into my head…

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  3. A system with a hybrid digitizer should always have palm rejection, or as mentioned. The ability to turn off the touch controls when the pen is in proximity. So it should be just a matter of ensuring that you lift up your palm before you lift up the pen, it shouldn’t be a problem when writing unless you lift the pen way up high when you leave a space between the words.

    hmmm… might depend on how high the pen can be detected though. Guess we’ll have to wait for actual usage tests.

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  4. This is exactly what I am looking for to replace my long in the tooth Motiom M1400, if it allow me to ink.

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  5. I watched two videos of the slate in action and in both of them setting the palm on the screen while inking had wonky results. HP’s Tablet PCs employ better palm rejection than this so I’m hoping this was just a fluke.

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    1. hmm.. that is depressing news. Question though. Were they in a normal writing posture, or demo posture? As in they delibrately put their palm on the screen to test rejection. Guess we can only be sure when there are real users!

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  6. This is the device I’ve been waiting for. Thank you, HP, for not listening to the naysayers. I am totally going to buy this tablet.

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    1. I’ve got my order confirmation in hand – now the long (3 week?) wait. I too congratulate HP on not being scared away by the salivating press coverage of the iPad. I owned the top of the line and sent it to eBay heaven when I finally decided I needed something just like this – a business first slate with media as a second thought. There is NO SUBSTITUTE for MS Office (particularly OneNote 2010) in the iPad or Android universe. I tried nearly every Office wannabe and note taking app on the ipad, and the results were – (1) poor compatibility – like the bad old days of converting WordPerfect and Word documents back and forth; and (2) a capacitive only pen experience is purely depressing. Thank you HP.

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  7. Been waiting for this too, my only issue will be battery life, otherwise it will have everything I dreamt my ipad should have.

    Have any battery life numbers been posted anywhere? That and instant on (please have a SSD option) are the only dealbreakers for me.

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    1. 5 hrs of battery and comes standard with a 64gb SSD. I ordered mine two days ago. I am not expecting this to replace my Dell Tablet, but it will be great to have inking capability along with a full OS, with portability. Having flash capability will be good too.

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  8. as excited as i am about this tablet, i’m going to hold off on placing my order until there is confirmation regarding the “palm rejection” tech in place. an active digitizer does me no good if i can’t write on it like i do on my motion le1600 or fuji st5112.

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  9. A wimpy 2-cell battery on a non-Pinetrail Atom won’t be breaking any records – good luck getting more than 2 hours out of it! Getting rid of Intel’s obsolete inventory is one thing, but I would have expected at least an N455 in there to help supplement battery life. Bad move HP.

    Ditto on the poor choice to use Crystal HD – it’s proven to be too driver dependent to ensure compatibility with every video codec on every platform out there and is a terrible thermal hog.

    As much as I’m a fan of seeing a Windows 7 slate arrive, this offering from HP is anything but impressive.

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  10. I would love to see this dual boot Android.

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    1. I couldn’t agree more… but I don’t expect this to happen since WebOS has entered the picture

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    2. I’m not sure, but given the Atom processor, shouldn’t you be able to run other OS’s? I know you can do Linux and Hackintosh (both from experience on a Dell Mini 9 – ok – no flame throwers please), and I believe I read somewhere that you can run Android on the Atom.

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      1. apparently uses GMA 500 which makes it difficult to get drivers for hackintosh, but certainly may spur some more interest in getting appropriate drivers. I would like to use this as a hackintosh device too, I’m sure someone will try soon!

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