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Summary:

I spend a lot of time checking RSS feeds for news that affects my work. I follow thousands of websites through the feeds, and those generate many thousands of posts that need my attention. My Android app of choice to do this is gReader Pro.

gReader Pro featured

On an average day, I spend a lot of time checking RSS feeds for news that affects my work. I follow thousands of web sites through the feeds, and those sites generate many thousands of articles that need my attention. On the desktop, I use Google Reader ,in the web browser, as I find it a good way to work with so much information. On the phone I prefer an app that streamlines the process, and presents the information in a manner best suited for the smaller screen. I’ve tried many RSS feed readers that interface with Google Reader, and my app of choice is gReader Pro.

This app works with the Android phone interface to present a volume of information in a way that’s meaningful and easy to manipulate. It supports all of the features of Google Reader, in a way that takes full advantage of the touch display. I can speed through thousands of news items in a short time. There’s a free, ad-supported version, and the full version is €3.99 ($5.53 USD).

This five-minute video shows the basic operation of gReader Pro, and demonstrates how I use it. It shows how the app presents lots of feeds to the user, and how the program automatically removes items from view after reading them. It gives a good view of the article browser, including the user controls that only appear when needed.

Related content from GigaOM Pro (sub req’d):

  1. Have you tried NewsRob? UI isn’t as slick, but it seemed to work better for me.

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    1. Yes I have, but prefer gReader.

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      1. James where do you add the pic for your blog – or does it take a standard pic?

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      2. It just grabs the favicon, I believe.

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    2. It always surprises me that folks are trusting enough to use apps like NewsRob that require you to give up your Google login credentials. Non-starter for me.

      Nice to see that gReader Pro has OAuth as an option. Readerscope, FeedSquares, and my6sense (that last a bit different app) all also use secure authorization.

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  2. Guess I don’t see functionality that you’re not getting from the Android Reader site, unless it’s syncing for offline viewing, but I didn’t get that from your video.

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  3. Looks just like the Free gReader and that is $5.33 cheaper.
    What are the differences between the two readers? Why if the Pro better?

    /Dave

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