Summary:

AOL (NYSE: AOL) is shifting the balance a bit in terms of its content, ad and e-commerce divisions by putting Ned Brody, president of paid s…

AOL's EVP of paid services, Ned Brody

AOL (NYSE: AOL) is shifting the balance a bit in terms of its content, ad and e-commerce divisions by putting Ned Brody, president of paid services, at the head of those three areas, Business Insider reports. Brody’s new title will be COO of Media, Advertising and Commerce and President of Paid Services. While it looks like he now outranks David Eun, president of AOL Media and Studios, and Jeff Levick, AOL’s global ad sales head, the two will still report directly to CEO Tim Armstrong. AOL executives were not available for comment.

Brody returned nearly a year ago. He initially left AOL as SVP, premium services, in 2005. Brody held that post for about two years. In between AOL stints, Brody started his own company called Arpu, an ad tech firm that offered a software application known as GivAClick that was marketed to non-profits. It was described as “an online version of a supermarket cashier asking for a donation when you checkout.”

Brody was recently in charge of managing AOL’s first foray into the daily discount shopping space with a new site called Wow.com. The site is expected fully launch by the end of the year.

While Levick and Eun will not officially lose any power in Brody’s shift upward, it appears that Armstrong is not done rearranging the decks at AOL. There are two other interesting things about this move.

One is that Brody’s background doesn’t include working Armstrong at Google (NSDQ: GOOG), like Eun and Levick did. Armstrong has sometimes been criticized for surrounding AOL’s upper levels with former colleagues from the search giant. The other notable aspect of Brody’s promotion is that it seems to represent an evolution of AOL’s strategy. By putting a single person on top of content, ads and paid services, AOL is trying to find better ways of making sure those three disciplines are more in concert with each other, as opposed to remaining largely independent elements in the company’s widening constellation of functions.

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