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Summary:

HP has indicated since acquiring Palm that it will be moving forward with devices running webOS. This week, key HP executives let bits of information slip out about its plans, and it paints a good picture if you round all of them up.

HP Pre featured

HP has indicated it will be moving forward with tablets and phones based on the webOS platform since the acquisition of Palm, but without detailing plans for those anxious to know what to expect. This week, key HP executives have let bits of information slip out, and it paints a good picture if you round all of them up. We’ve done that for you, so you don’t have to.

PalmPad. The company stated soon after the Palm deal that it would be moving forward with tablets based on webOS, but without furnishing any details. This week, EVP Todd Bradley spilled the tidbit that in early 2011, HP will be releasing the “PalmPad.” That’s the first indication from HP of a new product name; it makes sense to carry the Palm name forward with the new product line.

No licensing. Todd Bradley also confirmed at the TC Disrupt Conference that HP will not be licensing webOS to third parties. The company will keep it all to itself and power phones, tablets and printers with the acquired OS. Palm pursued licensing deals for webOS prior to the HP deal, but never entered into any.

Death of Android, Windows Mobile. The focus on webOS as the company’s platform of choice makes one believe the company will stop work on any Android-based devices that are in progress. Confirmation of this was given this week by Jon Rubinstein, former CEO of Palm and now in charge of the operation integrated into HP. Rubinstein also admitted that HP’s long relationship with Windows Mobile was over, as the company had no intention of producing phones using Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7 OS.  HP is scrapping a lot of spent effort, as work on Android devices was in advanced stages; prototypes have been spotted in the past.

Windows Tablet this year. Rubinstein confirmed that a tablet using Windows 7, most likely the HP Slate, will appear this year in advance of a webOS tablet slated for early next year. A slate has recently appeared in photos that’s believed to be the HP Slate, and likely the tablet that HP will release later this year.

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  1. HP needs to speed things up. With Blackberry’s Play Book there is going to be a lot of companies with a huge headstart. I’m running my iPad with ProSwitcher which looks pretty cool but doesnt keep things running in the background as webOS. We’ll see how well it works with 4.2

  2. Thanks for your unbiased coverage, JK. I think the slanted media coverage of the Slate 500 has made HP gunshy. But as a long-time tablet user, I can’t wait for a Windows 7 tablet. And judging from the comments to many articles on the subject, I’m not alone in my desire for a tablet with a full OS.

  3. The HP Windows 7 slate is a disastrous move.

    What is HP thinking?

    After video leaked of it a couple of weeks ago, the HP Windows 7 slate has been universally condemned by the technology press. It has become the laughing stock of the industry. A complete joke.

    The problem for HP is that if it releases this hopeless device, HP’s reputation in mobile devices will be dragged down in the gutter with Microsoft’s. The ensuing mockery will then make it more difficult for HP to get traction for its successor, the webOS slate.

    HP: Don’t do it. Don’t release the silly Windows 7 slate. It’s not worth it. Stay with webOS. Don’t get distracted. Concentrate on webOS.

  4. Werris couldn’t be more wrong. The choice of its new CEO indicates HP is making a charge in the enterprise market. PalmOS is doubtless going to be the consumer sauce, but Windows 7 is the glue for the enterprise. The tech press may have made HP gun-shy as they fawn over Jobs’ latest success, but a Win7 slate with 5 hours of battery will rule the enterprise space. I’ve been desparately (and frustratingly) trying to make my iPad and dozen work-around Apps function on the business network, and finally gave up and went back to my HP 2730p TabletPC. You HAVE TO HAVE full network browsing and 100% MS Office compatibility to keep from going out of your mind. Even the best of the alternatives (DocsToGo) leaves you back where we were in earlier Windows days mashing documents between Word and WordPerfect (yes, it IS that bad).

    Nothing on iOS, Android, nor Linux-lite equals OneNote and the inking experience on the TabletPC. In fact, lack of a stylus = fail in the business world. Where the big FAIL is occuring is in Microsoft’s failure to customize Win7 for the touch interface and tablet manufacturers’ failing to bundle OneNote with EVERY tablet/slate PC running Win7. If they did, they would own the business and education markets, leaving the couch and casual travelers to revel in the magic of the iPad.

    1. Microsoft had 10 years to get the tablet market off of the ground.  By any measure they have failed. The webOS is head and shoulders superior over all other platforms.  If HP doesn’t launch a webOS tablet ASAP, Apple and Blackberry will bury them.

       So I take that enterprise users only put in 5 hours in a day? 

      I think your problem is your trying to use a tablet for work that should be done on a computer. Looks like you wasted $500 on buying that iPad that you never be satisfied with to begin with. Did you even try it before you bought it? The iPad isn’t for everybody. Obviously, if all you use is MS Office then you probably don’t want an iPad.   

      iPad+Cydia+iSSH=unbeatable IT Swiss army knife

      I keep finding new ways to use the iPad things I never thought of until I got under the hood.

      Have you tried NotetakerHD or Headspace? Those are just a couple of apps that totally kick ass and take advantage of the touchscreen. You can buy a stylus if you really want one.

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