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Summary:

European parliamentarians ratified a report today that is widely seen as an attempt to bring so-called three strikes measures against P2P file sharing back into the spotlight. Three strikes is seen as controversial in Europe, but the report insists that current laws don’t go far enough.

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The European parliament ratified a report on intellectual property enforcement today that’s seen as the next step to introduce three-strikes measures against file sharing in all of Europe (hat tip to Futurezone). The report is titled “Enforcement of intellectual property rights in the internal market” and deals with a variety of copyright infringements, including counterfeit products and drugs. Its main focus is P2P file sharing, which it intends to fight with so called-graduate response measures that will eventually lead to the termination of an alleged infringer’s Internet account.

Measures like these, also know as three strikes, are seen as controversial in the European Union. France instituted its own three-strikes legislation earlier this year, and Torrentfreak reported just this week that  ISPs have started to receive IP addresses of alleged French infringers. However, the IPRED2 framework that would institute such measures in all of Europe has lost steam in recent months. The report passed today is widely seen as an attempt to bring the subject back into the spotlight.

In fact, a large portion of the report is directly addressing three-strikes sceptics within the European Commission. For example, it states that it “[d]oes not share the Commission’s view that the principal body of laws with respect to IPR enforcement is already in place.”

The report also mentions the need for further education on copyright issues. Apparently, those European kids just don’t know what’s right and what’s wrong, and the report “(s)tresses the need to educate young people to enable them to understand what is at stake in intellectual property and to identify clearly what is legal and what is not, by means of targeted public awareness campaigns, particularly against online IPR infringement.”

The report isn’t binding, but it could help to set the tone for further copyright directives, as well as Europe’s take on the controversial ACTA negotiations. It was drafted by French parliamentarian Marielle Gallo, who is a member of the same party as French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The European parliament passed the report today with 328 votes, with 245 parliamentarians voting against it.

Image courtesy of (CC-BY-SA) Flickr user Jan Beckendorf.

Related content on GigaOm Pro (subscription required):

Will Three Strikes Laws Take the Field in U.S. Copyright Ballgame?

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  1. I’m amazed there was as many as 245 votes couldn’t be bought by lobbyists!

  2. I think intellectual property should be protected. Charmed Life Formula appreciates artistic achievements from all the member performers and protect their intellectual property.

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