Summary:

Video conferencing startup Vidyo introduced a new business unit and product offering today that is aimed at reducing the cost of broadcast video production by making it IP-based rather than satellite-based. With the launch of VidyoCast, Vidyo says it can reduce the cost of broadcasting significantly.

VidyoCast_Contribution


Video conferencing startup Vidyo introduced a new business unit and product offering today aimed at reducing the cost of broadcast video production by making it IP-based rather than satellite-based. With the launch of its new VidyoCast product offering, Vidyo says it can reduce the cost of broadcasting over satellite by 90 percent.

Vidyo first came to market with plans to take on industry giants like Cisco and Polycom in the telepresence market, with a high-quality, desktop-based video conferencing solution based on H.264/SVC video compression technology. By pricing its desktop, touch-screen video conferencing products under $1,000, the startup hoped to beat the competition on price while retaining the same video quality that they offer for telepresence solutions.

Now Vidyo is extending that same technology to the media world, with an IP-based product that seeks to undercut the cost of delivering broadcast-quality video streams via satellite. VidyoCast can take in video feeds from any source, whether it be from a remote camera crew, affiliate studio or even a desktop or laptop video camera, and enable the production team to assemble those feeds with a central control panel and distribute them to affiliates — all from one cloud-based product suite. The startup says VidyoCast can do all this at one-tenth the cost of satellite.

To lead the new initiative, Vidyo has hired broadcast veteran Jim O’Brien as general manager of the new business unit.

Vidyo has raised a total of $63 million since being founded in 2005, including a $25 million Series C round of financing announced in April. The startup was recently awarded a patent on its VidyoRouter architecture, which it says can be used over any IP network, including the broader Internet as well as LTE, 3G or 4G mobile networks. While enterprise telepresence may be its key focus, the company also licenses its video compression technology to Google for its Google Talk video chat application.

Related content on GigaOM Pro: Report: The Enterprise Videoconference Landscape, 2010 – 2015 (subscription required)

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