Summary:

Successful coworking communities have always been diverse at their core; their ability to bring together tech professionals from various disciplines is part of the value of being a member. It’s gratifying to see this innovative model of working now permeating beyond the technology sector.

coworking

Successful coworking communities have always been diverse at their core; their ability to bring together tech professionals from various disciplines into a shared environment is part of the value of being a member of a coworking space.

As the first generation of coworking spaces begins to reach maturity, it’s gratifying to see this innovative model of working now permeating beyond the technology sector into other industries. Indeed, niche coworking communities are now emerging to serve particular disciplines outside tech.

Tech investor Fred Wilson recently highlighted In Good Company and Green Spaces providing coworking services for female and green entrepreneurs, respectively — in a wide ranging post about coworking spacess in New York. Along with The Writers Junction in LA, which is tailored towards writers, it seems that these flexible work spaces are increasingly attractive to a broader demographic.

Green Spaces

Currently operating in New York and Denver, Green Spaces is seeking to provide local incubators for environmental and sustainability entrepreneurs. Monthly plans range from $50/month to $495/month, covering everything from a hotdesking to a permanent desk, with drop-in access available from $20/day. The residents are certainly a diverse bunch with everything from concierge service providers and magazine publishers to activist organizations and green realtors. Green Spaces seems to be much more eclectic than simply being “green”;  it’s actually a hub for progressive people and projects.

In Good Company

Also based in New York, In Good Company is focused on supporting women entrepreneurs through a combination of events, office space and a program of training activities; coworking is just one of a number of its offerings.
Pricing is at the high-end of the coworking market, but there’s a lot of additional value (parties, events, supplier discounts) thrown into the mix. Plans vary from a flat $400/year community membership package to a number of full-time and part-time “work packages” that run from $150/month to $1,600/month that are inclusive of a number of hours of desk space or dedicated private office space.

The Writers Junction

Based in Los Angeles, The Writers Junction, as the name suggests, is a haven for writers of all persuasions. The membership plans offer full- and part-time usage from as low as $89/month up to $140/month. Residents include journalists, screenwriters, directors, doctoral students and actors.

There’s a great two-minute video, with commentary from community members, that underlines the warmth of what appears to be a modern-day artists’ commune.

Bringing Together Communities

Each of these coworking spaces appears to be successfully nurturing and serving the needs of communities that may have lacked a focal point or hub prior to having a physical home. I’ve heard rumors of a nearby town here in the U.K. that’s toying with the notion of a coworking space for physical fitness professionals — bringing together gym coaches, dieticians, physiotherapists and “wellbeing” professionals, among other healthcare disciplines. Could we be seeing a reboot for many industries that had previously remained ensconced in disconnected silos?

Related GigaOM Pro content (sub req’d): By The Numbers: Running a Coworking Space

Photo by Flickr user Hyku, licensed under CC 2.0

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