Summary:

Apple’s tooting its own horn again, and this time it’s to the tune of 300 million downloads for iTunes U, the service that allows iTunes account holders to download lectures and other educational materials from various academic institutions, including Stanford, Harvard, Columbia, MIT and more.

itunesU-thumb

Apple’s tooting its own horn again, and this time it’s to the tune of 300 million downloads for iTunes U, the service that allows iTunes account holders to download lectures and other educational materials from various academic institutions. Included in the list of institutions that contribute content to iTunes U are MIT, Harvard, Stanford, Columbia and more.

In the presser announcing the milestone, Apple is quick to point out that the program is catching on internationally as well, with lots of new content having recently been added from universities based in China, Hong Kong, Japan, Mexico and Singapore, bringing the total number of files available for download globally to 350,000.

It may not seem like much in comparison to the success of the App Store, which boasts more than 5 billion downloads, but considering how niche the education market is, and how resistant academic institutions have been to giving up a paper-based model of texts and learning, it’s quite a feat. It also helps underscore just how successful Apple has been as a player among students, a huge reason for its continued success.

If you’ve yet to try out any iTunes U content, you should take a look and see what’s available. Even if you’re not currently enrolled at a university or college, there are tons of free content you could use to educate yourself and possibly pick up a new skill set that might be useful at your current job, or in finding a new one. In Apple’s own words:

iTunes U gives anyone the chance to experience university courses, lab demonstrations, sports highlights, campus tours and special lectures. All iTunes U content is free and can be enjoyed on a Mac® or PC, or wirelessly downloaded directly onto an iPhone®, iPod touch® and iPad™.

Have you used iTunes U content in the past? Let us know if you’ve found it useful (as a student or otherwise) in the comments.

Related GigaOM Pro Research: How To Manage Access To Digital Content

You’re subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

Comments have been disabled for this post