Summary:

Dr. Horrible collaborator Jed Whedon, in between writing for television and helping Felicia Day make music videos, has kept busy with his own projects. And his new self-published album, entitled History of Forgotten Things, represents a sincere effort to create compelling original music.

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While credit for the genius of Dr. Horrible’s Sing-A-Long Blog tends to go to its director, Joss Whedon, it’s always important to remember the music powering the web’s first high-profile musical was written by Jed Whedon.

Whedon’s been busy since Dr. Horrible, writing on the Fox series Dollhouse and the Starz series Spartacus with wife and fellow Dr. Horrible collaborator wife Maurissa Tancharoen (with whom he also creates the occasional delightful YouTube video). And he hasn’t stalled out musically either: Not only did he collaborate with Felicia Day on Do You Wanna Date My Avatar, but this week, Jed Whedon, under the band name Jed Whedon and the Willing, has put out his first full album, available now on iTunes.

There’s no fan service to be found in the 12 tracks that make up History of Forgotten Things, unless you count Felicia Day playing violin and singing backup on a few tracks. Instead, the album represents a sincere effort on Whedon’s part to create compelling original music. And while me pretending to be a music critic does the world of music criticism a great disservice, I will say that the set demonstrates a range of influences and styles while also remaining cohesive, unique and catchy. (“Last Man” is especially toe-tapping.) The digital booklet alone is definitely worth the full album price; it’s beautifully designed and includes many fun footnotes.

This isn’t the first time Whedon has self-published music under the nervouscircus label (the same name as his YouTube account); the single “Remains,” for which he shares credit with Tancharoen, was released on Amazon and iTunes. Both “Remains” and the History of Forgotten Things track “Drones” were also featured on Dollhouse.

So anyone looking for a reprise of Dr. Horrible‘s more memorable songs will go away disappointed. But if you’re a Dr. Horrible fan who’s also interested in supporting independent musical talent, it’s hard to imagine History of Forgotten Things not finding its way into your iTunes.

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