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Summary:

Dyyno announced today that it has rolled out a solution for customers that want to stream live or on-demand video to Roku’s broadband set-top box, allowing them to instantly build pages that appear in Dyyno’s Roku channel or build their own branded channels with its help.

DyynoRokuChannel-screenshot

Video streaming startup Dyyno announced today that it has rolled out a solution for customers that want to stream live or on-demand video to Roku’s broadband set-top box, allowing them to instantly build pages that appear in Dyyno’s Roku channel or build their own branded channels with its help.

Dyyno’s live TV portal offers content owners the opportunity to quickly turn on video streaming on the Roku player without having to download the SDK or do any app development on their own. The TV portal allows any small business to very quickly create a channel through its Roku app. These customers need only pay cost associated with streaming volume on that channel. Customers can also build dedicated Roku channels using the Dyyno backend. In this scenario, Dyyno will help them create custom branded channels of their own for a one-time setup fee as well as the streaming costs.

Roku has been aggressively adding channels to its lineup of content ever since it opened its Channel Store last November. With an open SDK, third-party developers can build and submit channels to be displayed on user TV sets through the Roku player. But Dyyno’s platform is aimed at helping those that don’t have the resources to build channels on their own.

Dyyno CEO Raj Jaswa points out that adding the ability to stream to user TVs through the Roku Player will enable its customers to deliver video to all three screens. The company also streams to Apple iPhone and Adroid mobile phones.

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  1. [...] of ways through which its users can distribute video streams online. Earlier this year, the startup introduced a portal through which its users could distribute videos on user TVs through the Roku broadband set-top box. [...]

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