4 Comments

Summary:

A new tablet device being developed by Verizon and Motorola could allow the telco to sign up new customers for video services offered through its wireless network. It could also be a hook to get new customers on its LTE network when it becomes available.

istock_000006321317xsmall (1)

Verizon could shake up the business model for wireless video with the launch of a new tablet it is reportedly developing with Motorola. According to a report in the Financial Times, the companies are building a tablet to compete against Apple’s iPad, but the new product could also help Verizon by giving it a way to offer new wireless video services.

The new tablet will reportedly have a 10-inch screen and be thinner and lighter than the Apple tablet. It is expected to use Google’s Android operating system and will also be capable of running applications and video delivered through Adobe Flash, which could make it an attractive alternative to the iPad. The FT also reports that the device could be tied to Verizon’s FiOS TV service.

Beyond just offering up a new product in the tablet category, the device could open up the possibility of Verizon offering video services to consumers that don’t live in its current fiber footprint. Verizon has spent upwards of $20 billion rolling out fiber to the home to entice them to purchase its pay TV services. But even with that sizable sum, Verizon FiOS still only passes about 12.9 million homes around the country.

Verizon has a national wireless network, however, that allows it to reach customers practically anywhere. That means that it could potentially roll out a video offering on its wireless network, using the tablet as a hook for new subscribers.

And its wireless services will soon get a whole lot more robust, with its next-generation LTE data network slated to launch as early as November 15. The LTE network will provide data rates of 5-12 Mbps — almost good enough for HD video — and be available in 25-30 markets by the end of 2010, covering approximately 100 million Americans. Verizon expects its LTE rollout to cover the entire country by 2013.

According to the FT, the new jointly developed tablet could be available as early as this fall, which would make it just in time for the holidays. But it would also coincide with Verizon’s LTE launch, which means the tablet, when available, could be used to get subscribers on the new data network.

Even if the full Verizon FiOS television experience isn’t delivered via the tablet, it might help Verizon boost FiOS subscribers in homes where services are already available but haven’t been activated. For example, in addition to a set-top box, a customer might have the option of getting a tablet as well, for time- and place-shifting pay TV content. Such a tie-in would be good for Motorola, which gets marketing help for the device from Verizon. If the tablet succeeds, Motorola could also offer it to other pay TV providers.

Related content on GigaOM Pro: Will Metered Mobile Data Slow the App Market’s Growth? (subscription required)

  1. Verizon is also talking about moving toward metered data plans with the launch of LTE. streaming video and metered data are not friendly to each other. if verizon wants to market and succeed with a tablet oriented toward streaming video content than an unlimited data model is absolutely mandatory.

    Share
    1. Perhaps they’ll cut a deal for FIOS subscribers, though that could bring unhealthy attention from the government. Sort of like the Comcast streaming of TV if you are a Comcast TV subscriber.

      Share
  2. Interesting article,except for the most important point missed: verizon will do data caps. No customer is gonna wanna shell out money for a data plan and then pay more for a monthly tv service and then be told to watch their data usage. No matter how aewsome the tablet.

    Share
  3. [...] noting that a sibling chip supports EVDO Rev. B for CDMA carriers too, which opens the doors for more tablets on the Verizon Wireless or Sprint [...]

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post