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Summary:

In July, 2010, Apple’s flagship products (not mice, keyboards or displays) but the products Apple chooses to feature at the top of the store’s main page are now 50% mobile. It’s only now that Apple’s role as a mobile tech company becomes immediately apparent.

apple_mobile_tech

I click through to Apple.com every other day mostly to read tech specs of new products and look for subtle changes that would warrant a post but mostly I just drool on my keyboard while glancing at the fancy gadgets.

I noticed something different this time around and I wanted to mark that in July, 2010, Apple’s flagship products (not mice, keyboards or displays) but the products Apple chooses to feature at the top of the store’s main page are now 50% mobile.

Apple dropped the “computer” part of its name and went Apple, Inc. a couple of years ago with the introduction of iPhone. Since then, it’s released the Apple TV, more iPods and the iPad, but it’s only now that Apple’s role as a mobile tech company becomes apparent at a glance.

Macintosh computers have high profit margins and Apple sold over 3 million of them last quarter but Mac sales only made up 33% of Apple’s earnings in that same quarter. The rest of their profits were made up of iPhone, iPad and iPod sales. Remember that Apple notebooks are technically mobile devices, too. That means that 9 out of 12 products of the marquee products Apple sells are mobile.

The Mac isn’t going away any time soon, but the amount of Apple products that are “mobile” will only grow. If rumors are correct, the MacBook Air will become even smaller, teetering on the brink of the netbook category (in terms of size, not specs) with an 11.6″ screen. We’ll see, but there’s no denying Apple is a mobile company and that’s not going to change.

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  1. “it’s only now that Apple’s role as a mobile tech company becomes apparent”
    Really? Slow news day is it?
    I would say they’ve been known at least as well for their laptops as desktops for the last decade at least. The iBook was launched in 1999.
    And how do you draw the conclusion that the amount of mobile products will grow? A new MacBook Air (or a new iPod touch) doesn’t shift the balance. What new products can you point to do back up that assertion?

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