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Summary:

YouTube has added a new feature to its account controls making it easier for users to appeal when videos are taken down for a Community Guidelines violation. The process allows anyone to appeal a strike against his account from directly within their account settings page.

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YouTube has added a new feature to its account controls that makes it easier for its users to appeal when videos are taken down for a Community Guidelines violation. Instead of users having to fill out a form, the new process allows anyone to appeal a strike against their account from directly within their account settings page with just a few clicks.

Due to the massive number of videos that are uploaded to the site every day, YouTube acknowledges that some videos are mistakenly taken down. If a video has been flagged by users, it is reviewed by YouTube and in some cases taken down, in which case a strike is placed against the uploader’s account. But the process isn’t perfect, and so YouTube has instituted this new appeals process.

When users whose videos have been taken down for a Community Guidelines violation sign into their account, they’ll have to acknowledge the strike against the account. They then can appeal from the “Manage Account” section under “Account Status.”

Once reviewed by YouTube again, if the video is found to not violate the Community Guidelines, it will be reinstated and the strike against the account will be removed. But users are only able to appeal the decision once, so if YouTube upholds the original decision, the video will remain down. Either way, the video site will send an email explaining the decision after an accepted or rejected appeal.

It’s worth noting that this appeals process is only for Community Guideline violations, and not for videos taken down as the result of a copyright violation. As a result, the new appeals process wouldn’t apply to videos like the Hitler Downfall meme or Twilight Eclipse: The 8-Bit Interactive Game. In those cases, users would have to follow the same process as before, filling out a form explaining why a video doesn’t infringe.

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  1. People still believe Youtube actually reviews things? A video can be taken down within seconds of a flag and tons of videos with no nudity get taken down for that very reason because of competitor’s false flagging. The system is broken.

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