Summary:

While the physical doors of this month’s Electronic Entertainment Expo were only open to professionals from the video gaming world, E3 video coverage by YouTube, Viacom and G4TV.com successfully brought the biggest announcements and demos to online audiences, with hundreds of thousands of gaming fans tuning in.

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Multimedia news and review site IGN scored big with its live-streaming coverage of this month’s Electronic Entertainment Expo. At peak viewership, there were 118,000 concurrent viewers, and viewers on average spent over an hour on the site — 65.09 minutes, precisely. IGN had teamed up with YouTube for  the expo, including all of the major press conferences. But other sites were also successful streaming the event.

Spike TV and Gametrailers.com, which are both owned by Viacom, drew a combined 10 million viewers for both online and televised coverage of the event, according to an emailed release. More than 2.1 million live sessions were generated for the Microsoft, EA, Ubisoft, Nintendo and Sony press conferences — the most in Viacom history.

Also, the Comcast-owned G4TV.com (see disclosure below) had its biggest week of traffic ever, according to a G4 representative, breaking all previous records with 1.5 million unique visitors. The average time spent on the site was another record-breaker — over 13 minutes — with over 7.6 million video plays across all platforms. This includes live-streaming and video watched via the G4 iPhone App.

What goes through my head, looking at these numbers, is what other events of this nature could potentially benefit from live-streaming coverage. Take, for example, the San Diego Comic-Con. While hardly an industry-only event, Comic-Con has exploded to such an extent over the past several years that it’s pretty much impossible to experience everything you might want to, and the level of crowd control demanded as a result verges on the insane. A virtual pass to the festivities might go over well for fans who prefer to watch from afar — and avoid the unwashed masses.

Disclosure: I recently worked as a consulting writer on G4TV.com’s “Attack of the Show,” but am not a Comcast employee and did not contribute to any of G4’s E3 coverage.

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