4 Comments

Summary:

Using transitions and effects in your Keynote presentations can really help keep your audience engaged. We’ll show you how to get started creating transitions and effects right away.

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Using transitions and effects in your Keynote presentations can really help keep your audience engaged. We’ll show you how to get started creating transitions and effects right away.

In this TechUniversity Keynote Transitions & Effects screencast (subscription required), we’ll walk you through creating transitions and effects in Keynote.

View full Keynote Transitions & Effects screencast on TechUniversity (subscription required)

Screencast Sample

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  1. This TechUniversity teasers just suck, we don’t want to see your ads every 3 TAB posts. If you want to build a pay-per-view page go on, but keep it separated from this blog, don’t turn TAB into your advertising platform.

  2. Jesus Franco Saturday, May 15, 2010

    Wow, Tech University has great potential, I think it should have html5 video (so that I can watch them on my iPad without downloading) and offer some robust video that is at least 30 minutes long. Something more along the lines of Screencasts Online or those Lynda tutorials. As of now the site has no value, the videos are short, and they offer nothing more than Apples own ( not to mention free) videos. Come on people.

    1. Hey Jesus. All the videos actually will already play on your iPad/iPhone/iPod touch. If you are viewing the site on those devices, we swap out the flash player with a regular quicktime movie file.

      And we also already offer a number of longer videos (see here). We do plan on doing more but part of the reason we keep them short is that most people don’t want to spend hours and hours learning how to do something…we’ve purposely tried to keep them concise so you can learn something in a shorter amount of time.

  3. “Using transitions and effects in your Keynote presentations can really help keep your audience engaged.”

    That’s where you are dead wrong. Transitions and effects are just distractions that keeps your audience from focusing on the content of your talk. When to use them? — Almost never, if you care about your message, and your audience.

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