Sprint Cans Nexus One; Getting the iPhone?

20 Comments

It seemed that an EVDO version of Google’s (s goog) Nexus One was a sure bet. Google had been promising a Verizon (s vz) version of the Nexus One since launch, and that was followed by word that Sprint (s s) would also be handling the phone. Recently Google itself dropped the promise of the Verizon model, and today comes word that the Nexus One is off the Sprint table, too.

This is not that big a deal to either carrier, as Verizon has the Droid Incredible and Sprint is preparing the launch of the 4G-enabled EVO. It probably does spell the end for the Nexus One, Google’s flagship phone for its experimental business model aimed at removing the carrier from the phone business. I guess the carriers are thumbing their collective noses at Google. It’s not clear if Google will ever release another phone.

In the “totally unlikely to come true” department, yesterday I was told that Sprint will be getting the iPhone this summer. You heard that right, while rumors have long pointed to Big Red getting the iPhone this year, never has it been mentioned that Sprint would be selling the iPhone. I can’t believe this is true, although the source has been reliable in the past and does work for Sprint. I’m not holding my breath.

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20 Comments

Brian Smith

Just talked to a sprint employee and she mentioned that they have a count down at Sprint right now. She said its just under 5-6 weeks before the phone will be released! :)

Ugh

The only thing that bothers me about Sprint ditching the Nexus One is that it feels like they’re assuming Sprint customers will buy the Evo 4G instead. What if I didn’t want that behemoth of a phone? What if I liked Android, wanted a faster processor than the Hero but didn’t want all the bells and whistles of the Evo 4G? It seems like AT&T and Verizon are adding sleek, powerful phones to their lineup by the truckload while Sprint is throwing the Evo 4G around like it’ll automatically sell like the iPhone did for AT&T. I have a Palm Pre on Sprint and have been doing a little research to see what phone I’ll replace it with this summer. For a while, the Nexus One seemed like a good fit. Now I’m back to square one: in need of a quality smartphone, but with Sprint’s lackluster lineup to work with. Unless I somehow decide I want to pay extra for 4G service (not likely, I’m on a share plan) and feel like having a dinner tray in my pocket, I’m starting to think Blackberry will be getting my business.

Bodi

Nexus One/Google provides no customer service. Google just wants to make money on the back of the phone companies. If you call the customer service for NexusOne, none comes on the phone to provide the help.

Google is supposed to provide this customer service. Plus Sprint has a better phone in HTC EVO 4G, why would Sprint take the NexusOne customer service mess?

john

They have a tech support line: “For technical support, please contact Nexus One support from Google at 1-888-48-NEXUS (63987). Open daily from 7:00 am EST to 10:00 pm EST.”

I’ve called twice and received help on the spot. What kind of issues did you experience?

TonyP

This seems odd considering Apple confirmed AT&T has exclusivity through 2012 for the iPhone. Unless the fine print says GSM network only.

I’m a Nexus One owner on the T-Mobile network and former Sprint Customer. I’d never switch back to Sprint, too many issues with billing and horrible service in my area. I only recently switched to the Nexus One, got tired of waiting on Palm to launch a GSM phone on any carrier. This bait and switch by Sprint is not first time they’ve done this. Another reason I’d never consider them.

I wanted ultimate flexibility when I switched to GSM a few years ago, the freedom to buy the best phone for me and the freedom to switch carriers if I didn’t like the carrier service or price. Easier to do when all you need to do is swap a SIM card. I understand the desire people have for the iPhone on Sprint or any other carrier, if they don’t like or want AT&T. I got the same desire for a WebOs phone and until the HP acquisition it seemed unlikely.

I love my new iPad, but not the iPhone, I prefer WebOS or Android phone to an iPhone. For you Sprint customers who’ve been waiting for an the Nexus One on Sprint, if the rumors are true, decide if you like the carrier more than the phone, then you can either pick a different phone or start a letter writing campaign to Sprint and try to get them to reverse their decision or switch to a carrier with the phone you want.

iPhone with AT&T until 2012

Okay..you can put that one to rest now. iPhone cannot go to Sprint, Verizon, or tMobile until 2012. According to official documents, iPhone has a 5 yr contract with AT&T. Meanwhile, people are just going to continue to buy Android smartphones as they are now more popular than the iPhone in America. iPhone has lost it’s touch and appeal while investors begin to pull out their investments in Apple shares: with all the heavy competition and iPhone’s locked in contract restriction with AT&T, Apple iPhone is doomed!

davesmall

Hmmm. An iPhone on WiMax sounds like it could be something Apple would be interested in. I can’t see a CDMA version because you can’t talk on the phone and do anything else at the same time. CDMA is on the way out anyway.

We do know that Apple’s original agreement with AT&T was for five years of exclusivity. We don’t know if there have been modifications since. There might also have been contingency provisions such as an out if sales exceeded a certain volume. Seems to me Apple would have drafted a complex contract with some ‘what ifs’ covered up front.

distortedloop

Hard to see the iPhone on Sprint this summer in light of Apple just confirming that AT&T got a 5 year exclusivity deal (2007-2012) as reported on several other sites yesterday.

Regarding the Nexus One CDMA phones dying on the vine, do we actually have confirmation that it was the CARRIERS that dumped the phone, and not Google or HTC? Sprint was crowing they’d have the N1 real soon now just a couple of weeks ago. Why do that if they were thinking of canceling it?

I own a Nexus One, and it’s got some great features, but it’s got some serious flaws as well. The touchscreen is sub-par compared to even three year old iPhones; it’s flakey and inaccurate. Touches often don’t get registered in the right place (makes typing a pain), and sometimes not all, requiring you to cycle the screen (sleep mode).

The N1 also has some serious radio issues (at least on T-Mobile) with the poorly placed antenna. Holding the phone the way you naturally do causes your palm to block the antenna signal and seriously deteriorates signal strength.

Perhaps these technical issues were too much to overcome for the CDMA version and HTC or Google canned the projects. Perhaps sales were just too low for the T-Mo and AT&T versions that Google decided it wasn’t worth the effort for more market fracture on the device and canned the project.

I’m not too happy with Nexus One on T-Mobile. That’s mostly T-Mobile’s fault (missed calls, no signal, no 3G in many areas of Los Angeles I frequent), but the touchscreen issue, and another $580 investment (you guys forget the 10% sales tax when you quote the price) makes switching to AT&T with the N1 not too exciting a prospect, especially in light of the HTC Incredible (if you’re a Verizon nut), the Sprint EVO 4G (this is currently top of my list as potential N1 replacement) and the imminent iPhone 4th gen (I won’t call it the iPhone 4G because it doesn’t support a 4G network). I’m not sure why anyone would be buying a smartphone in the next 6 weeks without knowing what Apple’s got up its sleeve – unless you’re just dead set against the iPhone or AT&T.

Al Karel

I surely hope so. Sprint has great for 4 years for me. It would be a fine match for both Apple and Sprint.

Brad

If the EVDO iPhone comes out on Sprint and not verizon, verizon is going to see some serious consumer churn. Most verizon users seem to be recovering sprint users who need better coverage and suffered through the dark days of poor CS. Now that sprint coverage is really good and has high speeds and non-crippled phones and cheap rates, this could be huge. Not only that but it would dramatically shift the mobile market to three viable carriers instead of two (which is where we are heading).

Plus I would serially consider Sprint, but after being an Alltel customer swept up into verizon, I will never go back to the high rates and crippled phones of verizon.

kevin

Shame, nexus one is a good phone and choice is always good. Doesn’t look good for a Moto nexus two.

kykr

Sprint called me a few weeks ago wanting to “add value” to my plan. She told me that in a meeting they were told they would be getting an iPhone this summer. I have the pre, and had high hopes for Palm but they fell short on the hardware. Give me a choice between an iPhone and an EVO and I will be in heaven!

pmc

I really want an iphone. please put on sprint network!

chuck

:( I guess Sprint tricked me into staying on for a few months when they promised Nexus One support, but now I will switch to T-Mobile. Crippled Sprint-controlled phones scare me.

Seriously, how can they just back out after promising this? Everyone knew about the Supersonic/EVO at the time of that announcement, so it’s not like they planned this all along?

NeoteriX

???

Sprint phones have never been crippled… you must be thinking of Verizon. :)

Stuart

Unsubsidized phones get no love. Apple at first tried to have a unique way of selling it’s first Iphone and that model failed for them. Google tried something different and it failed for them. I wish the Nexus One had both T-Mobile and AT&T 3G bands so it could give some carrier independence.

I’m also guessing the Andriod manufacturers didn’t like Google competing with them. But it would be nice to see a Nexus 2 even if it is just a “development phone”

Shock Me

Just got a 4G overdrive from Sprint for my iPad since the higher speed will be online sooner. I certainly wouldn’t have a problem giiving them all my business.

On the other hand, two networks less waiting.

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