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Summary:

The HP EliteBook 2740p notebook is the third generation of the Tablet originally released as the 2710p. This tablet adds advanced processor options and touch input to a thin convertible form with a swivel screen. In this video tour you get a walk around the notebook.

HP 2740p


The HP EliteBook 2740p convertible notebook is the third generation of the Tablet PC originally released as the 2710p. This tablet adds advanced processor options and touch input to a thin convertible form with a swivel screen. The 2740p as shown on the video is decently configured:

  • CPU: Intel Core i5, 2.53 GHz
  • Memory: 2 GB
  • Storage: 160 GB, 5,400 rpm
  • Display: 12.1-inch, 1280×800, capacitive multitouch, active pen digitizer
  • Ports: 3xUSB 2.0, Firewire, VGA out, audio in/out, power, RJ-11, RJ-45, SD/MMC slot, ExpressCard
  • Communications: Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 2.1
  • Webcam: 2 MP
  • OS: Microsoft Windows 7 Professional (64-bit)
  • Battery: 6-cell, 2.0 Ah
  • Dimensions and weight: 11.42 x 8.35 x 1.25 inches, 3.8 lbs.

In this video tour you get a complete walk around the notebook, with all ports and connectors demonstrated. You get a close-up look at the chiclet keyboard that is augmented with a touchpad and trackstick for input control. The swivel screen is demonstrated along with inking support.

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  1. James,

    Nice but what’s the price point HP is planning on selling the unit(demo that you are evaluating) at? $1000, $1500 or $2000?

    I noticed that your videos are much sharper now, what digital camcorder are you using? I know you’ve used the Kodak Zi8 but you also use a unit with a remote? Just curious!

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    1. It is about $1600. The camera I am using is the Canon HF100 HD camcorder. I love this camera.

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  2. Mike Reilly Monday, May 10, 2010

    Thanks for the review and video
    1) The 4-1/2 hr battery life is disappointing. When it has the i5 ULV cpu in June/July, what do you guesstimate the battery life will be; 5-1/2 hrs?

    2) Does the review unit have the outdoor screen? If so, could you take it outside and show us how it looks? I remember that I was disappointed with the 2730p outside?

    3) I wish HP had added an opposite side camera. What’s the best solution for adding a usb or wireless camera to it? I need to make this be like a Motion J3400 (or maybe I need a J3400, but I saw a user review that gave the J3400 poor marks. Plus, it’s expensive.) I want to be able to take and automatically add in photos as I’m writing notes.
    Thanks,

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  3. Allan Jones Monday, May 10, 2010

    In the comments on an earlier post, someone was suggesting waiting for a CULV version of this. Is this likely to happen? (I’m sure HP is not saying anything about it.) What difference would it make?

    Presumably one can have 32 bit W7 with this?

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    1. CULV would likely offer longer battery power, but I like the performance/battery combo of this unit better.

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  4. Great video James. Having used both units, would you recommend this or the smaller/lighter Fujitsu P1630?

    I’ve been looking at the Toshiba M780 tablet and it’s not too much different than the HP, except it’s got an optical drive built-in. I do like the keyboard on the HP better, and it’s also a full pound lighter than the Toshiba.

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    1. I would prefer this one over the Fuji. It’s a full notebook and the dual digitizer is the way to go. That extra pound on the Tosh would not suit me well, either.

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    2. Sam (the other one) Monday, May 10, 2010

      Pretty clearly, the HP 2740p is quite a bit superior to the Fujitsu P1630 in every way except for size and weight. I’m always looking to reduce weight and bulk, I’m wondering when Fujitsu is going to introduce the refresh for the P1630.

      The Lenovo Thinkpad X201 Tablet is probably the closest competitor to the 2740p, what’s your thoughts between those?

      One other thing Lucious, have you also checked out Fujitsu’s other tablets? They’ve got two 12″ dual digitizer multi-touch models as well…

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  5. Hi James,

    I currently have the 2710p and a Dell XT2. I would love to replace both of them with the 2740p. I am surprised that you didn’t demo the multitouch on the 2740p. That will be the deciding factor to me keeping or selling the XT2. I was hoping that with the HP’s strengthened glass display that multitouch might work a little smoother than the non glass display on the Dell XT2. If you still have your 2710p I am sure that the battery slice from it will work with the 2740p as well. Keep up the good work.

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    1. The multitouch works as well as you would expect, far better than on the xt2 if what I’ve read about the Dell is to be believed.

      I don’t have the 2710p any longer unfortunately, and yes, all accessories are still compatible with the 2740p, I’ve been told.

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  6. Nice video tour- the screen looks decently visible at an angle in either orientation, if slightly dim. I’ll second the comment about wanting to see how this little beastie performs outdoors. Thanks for the vid, James!

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  7. How would you describe general handling/feel of the 2740p? Consumer-class tablets like the HP TX2 and the Fujitsu T4310 feel cheap with their creaky plastic cases and keys. For enterprise-class tablets, the Dell Latitude XT2 is solid and has a nice rubberized coating and the Lenovo x201t is reviewed as being as solid as the x200t. As far as I can tell, the HP 2740p has a metal exterior but haven’t seen one in person to see how it handles (keyboard squeak when typing, chassis flex when holding on lap/arm, LCD feels flimsy when opening) or feels (I like metal surfaces because they’re easier to clean and are less likely to pick up easy scratches and don’t show fingerprints as much).

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    1. The 2740p is a business class device and the construction shows this. It is solid and very rigid during use, due to the reinforced internal frame according to HP. I find it even more solid than the x201t, which is also nicely constructed.

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  8. Question(s) about the Ambient Light Sensor: The HP site suggests there is an ambient light sensor on this machine. Did your review unit have one? Can you comment on it’s effectiveness? Can you turn off the ambient light sensor in a control panel – or is it only managed in the BIOS?

    Thanks,

    Jason

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    1. It does have one and as I usually do, I turned it off. These tend to dim the screen too much for me. It’s toggled via a simple keystroke.

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  9. Hey James,

    first of all thank you for your time to let us participate in your experiences with the latest Tablet PCs on the market.

    I am very curious about the accuracy of the tip of the pen towards the acutual dot on the screen. I know that a lot of reviews unfortunately neglect that. How much does it deviate from each other above all around the edges? It would be very nice if you can compare it to the Lenovo x201t.

    Thank you very much in advance.

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    1. It doesn’t deviate at all; neither does the x201t.

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  10. In terms of how this performs outdoors, keep in mind there is an optional “outdoor” display for this model for users who primarily work outside like in the construction industry, etc.. I have verified from an HP rep that the crispness/clarity of the display for indoor viewing will not be as good if you have this option so there is a trade off for that. I have ordered my 2740p and will hopefully have it in a week :)

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