5 Comments

Summary:

Like a lot of you, I have way too many email and social network accounts. Threadsy, which has now entered public beta, puts them all in one place. I hadn’t tried Threadsy in a while, and was pleasantly surprised at how polished it has become.

Like a lot of web workers, I have way too many email and social network accounts. Threadsy, which has now entered public beta, aims to put them all in one place. I hadn’t tried Threadsy in a while, and was pleasantly surprised at how polished it has become.

Threadsy supports email accounts, including IMAP, Gmail, Google Apps, Yahoo, Windows Live/MSN, AOL and MobileMe, as well as Facebook and multiple Twitter accounts. Once authorized (using OAuth or Facebook Connect, so you don’t have to give Threadsy your passwords), updates and messages from these accounts appear in a unified inbox.

When Doriano wrote about it back in December, he noted that it took a while to start up; that issue seems to have been resolved. After login, Threadsy displays an amusing quote or an item from their Twitter feed for a few seconds, then loads Threadsy’s main screen.

In the main screen, you’ll see your inbox on the left, and a social network feed on the right. Threadsy also provides access to Facebook Chat, AIM, MySpace IM, Google Talk and Twitter through the included Meebo Bar. I was concerned that having that much information on one page might lead to overload, but I didn’t find it so.

Threadsy’s email functions work well and searches are fast. You can also view Gmail’s labels/folders. It manages attachments reasonably well, although it doesn’t display PDFs inline the way Apple Mail and Gmail can. You can also print messages, but they include a large Threadsy image in the header.

The compose screen is very slick. Just start typing a recipient’s name, and Threadsy will auto-complete the information if the person is in the address book for any of your accounts. You can specify which of your accounts you want to send the message from, and you can attach files. You can’t actually edit your address book, though.

The social network feed in the sidebar is well laid out, and can be resized. It has some nice touches, like an automatic link expander. When one pulls up a message, the sidebar automatically switches to a timeline showing the sender’s latest updates. This is a useful function that Gist also does well.

Threadsy offers help, but everything is pretty intuitive. The service works very well, although I do have a wish-list of features I’d like to see:

  • The ability to control sounds for each account separately, and to change the default sound. I turned off the incoming message sound, since it was chiming very frequently.
  • The ability to edit message signatures, as they automatically include links to one’s networks, along with a prominent “sent from Threadsy” message that can’t be eliminated without turning off signatures entirely.
  • A”view this message in Gmail” option.
  • An option to view full headers and the original message code.
  • Growl notifications.

Threadsy does still have some bugs. For some reason, it keeps failing to authorize my Gmail account, even though Google says that Threadsy has access. And it sometimes doesn’t display embedded YouTube videos from friends’ Facebook status updates. Threadsy isn’t quite ready to be my universal inbox yet, but it’s getting close.

Have you tried Threadsy?

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  1. Leslie A. Joy Thursday, May 6, 2010

    I found Threadsy to be way too much of an information overload and way too busy.

    After two days, I went right back to Hootsuite and heavily filtered Gmail account. I just put all what they call “optional mail” that doesn’t get filtered into a folder and deal with it when I have time.

  2. Ramkumar Shankar Friday, May 7, 2010

    I thought it was great. There have been times where I have missed twitter replies and such, so seeing messages to me shown separately on the left was pretty neat.

    Besides what you’ve said, not being able to compose a twitter direct message right now seems like a major oversight. And I have other minor issues like scrolling down the stream should load more messages (they’re working on this), and the status after posting should disappear by itself without having to click ‘hide’.

    But on the whole, I like it a lot. I thought the presentation was clean, and it didn’t feel like information overload to me. Also, it saves me at least 3 browser tabs, and that’s a good thing.

  3. Arran North Friday, May 7, 2010

    A really nice solution, to my tab overload!

    Highly recommend this to anyone with the ability to filter out time wasting/distracting rubbish – if you are worried about your productivity, then give this a skip; but if you feel you can star it, and reply later, then go for it!

    Quality, useful, webapp, with minor bugs and a few minor missing features.

  4. Silentale: Unified Address Book, Message Searches and Archive Thursday, May 13, 2010

    [...] one place to archive and search your messages. It’s similar to Threadsy, which aims to bring together your email and social network inboxes in one place, although as you can’t actually compose new messages, or edit much of the content of your [...]

  5. Silentale: Unified Address Book, Message Searches and Archive | Stocks! Thursday, May 13, 2010

    [...] one place to archive and search your messages. It’s similar to Threadsy, which aims to bring together your email and social network inboxes in one place, although as you can’t actually compose new messages, or edit much of the content of your [...]

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