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Summary:

TeliaSonera, which deployed the first 4G network in the world last December, has released data that indicates once users have 4G service, more than half — 54 percent — would never go back to 3G.

TeliaSonera, which deployed the first 4G network in the world last December, has released data showing that once users have the faster Long Term Evolution service (GigaOM Pro sub req’d), more than half won’t go back to slower 3G. The Nordic carrier conducted the survey among its 4G customers after they had used 4G for 100 days, and 54 percent said they would never go back to 3G.

Sure, these customers were already well versed in mobile technology — more than 90 percent had upgraded from an existing 3G connection and 43 percent had an iPhone. But if more than half are willing to stick around even as the price increases (TeliaSonera had a sweet deal for the first customers), that’s pretty awesome. Other results included a change in surfing habits, which makes sense given that 65 percent are relying on that 4G as a supplement to fixed-line broadband (in other words, it’s not a replacement), and now they can do even more. From the report:

  • 26 percent say they are working more on a mobile basis
  • 23 percent say they are downloading larger files
  • 19 percent say they watch online TV/stream movies
  • 16 percent say they began surfing the web more

Carriers have to be thrilled with such data, as it shows that faster broadband speeds can make customers spend more time online and view 3G as something subpar. I imagine I’ll be paying a pretty penny for my LTE connection once Verizon upgrades its network by the end of this year. But I have a feeling it will be worth it.

Image courtesy of Flickr user Panoramas

  1. Hardly surprising that people prefer a faster network.

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  2. Reminds me of a poll about HDTV from Philips in 2007. 94 percent said they would never go back to SD-TV…

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  3. [...] up to 100 Mbps. With speed like that, it’s easy to see why customers on that network will never go back to mere [...]

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  4. [...] up to 100 Mbps. With speed like that, it’s easy to see why customers on that network will never go back to mere [...]

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