Summary:

You take the idealism of college students, you combine it with the message-spreading power of social media, and in this case you end up with a nice little story about saving babies in the Third World. Three students at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business created a […]

You take the idealism of college students, you combine it with the message-spreading power of social media, and in this case you end up with a nice little story about saving babies in the Third World. Three students at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business created a three-minute video for a class entitled “The Power of Social Technology,” to raise awareness about an organization called Embrace.

Embrace, which itself was founded by a group of Stanford graduate students, has developed a portable incubator for low-birth-weight babies that requires no electricity and costs about $25 each. The video made by Karla Gallardo, Aastha Gupta and Lavanya Ashok, which focuses on encouraging donations to Embrace, frames a $25 contribution to the organization as an opportunity to save a life, showcasing the life of just one Indian child as an example.

A hope. A life. An Embrace. http://www.embraceglobal.org/donate from Karla Gallardo on Vimeo.

While the video can hardly be said to have gone viral — with approx. 200 views on Vimeo and approx. 1,000 views on YouTube (and the latter’s audio is disabled, most likely due to the use of R.E.M.’s Everybody Hurts for the middle section) — that’s not necessarily important if it gets seen by the right people.

The video raised more than $4,000 in donations in its first 10 days online, according to the San Jose Mercury News. In addition, it’s going to get some play on much bigger screens, thanks to Digital Signage Networks of India CEO Gaurang Shah, who saw the video and plans to run “a version” of it on the network’s digital network.

The text-heavy video definitely feels like a school project, though the students do get credit for showing some mastery of an After Effects-like program to create their titles. And the use of Everybody Hurts is never a sign of a subtle hand at the wheel. But the message is getting out there — and in this case, that’s what matters.

Related GigaOm Pro Content (subscription required): The State of Social TV

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