110 Comments

Summary:

Facebook has given three carefully chosen launch partners — Microsoft’s Docs.com, Yelp and Pandora — have access to a powerful, inventive and creepy tool called “instant personalization.” The company hopes to extend it to other partners but is testing the waters with these sites first.

Facebook at its f8 conference yesterday launched tools for websites to add a social layer by bringing over Facebook friend connections. These social plugins are available to any web developer and use a simple piece of code to add a Facebook frame onto a page, instantly make that page social. So, for example, if you visit CNN.com, you could see what news stories your friends liked and shared there.

CNN doesn’t actually see that happening — to the news org it’s just a box it leaves open on its site for Facebook to populate — but it’s presumably happy because users get a more personal experience and stick around longer. And users don’t get identified for simply visiting a site; they have to log in to Facebook through a dialog box in order for their presence and activities to be shared with their Facebook friends.

Facebook also introduced a way for certain sites to push this further than everyone else. Three carefully chosen launch partners — Microsoft’s Docs.com, Yelp and Pandora — have access to what Facebook is calling “instant personalization.” This is a powerful, inventive and creepy tool that the company hopes to extend to other partners but is testing the waters with these three first.

Ta-da! It’s personal

Instant personalization means that if you show up to the Internet radio site Pandora for the first time, it will now be able to look directly at your Facebook profile and use public information — name, profile picture, gender and connections, plus anything else you’ve made public — to give you a personalized experience. So if I have already publicly stated through my Facebook interests page that I like a musical artist — say, The Talking Heads — the first song I hear when I go to Pandora will be a Talking Heads song or something that Pandora thinks is similar.

The idea is that Pandora is a somewhat hard concept to explain to new users — before it existed, people didn’t have their own personalized radio stations based on similarities between artists and song. Now, new users will derive value from Pandora before they even sign up. The first time they load the page it will be to their favorite music.

This new sign-up customization has the biggest privacy implications of everything Facebook unveiled yesterday. Until now, when you browsed the web, it was safe to assume you were anonymous until you actively logged into a site. But in recent years, behavioral advertisers have started following us around as we browse, using cookies to find out where we’ve been in order to offer up customized ads on new pages we visit. (So if I’ve been shopping on Kayak for an upcoming trip, I might get ads about similar flights and travel destinations showing up on a page I visit later that day.) In the post-f8 world, when you show up to Yelp having never been there before, the page will now show a feed of restaurants and stores that your Facebook friends have liked and reviewed using Yelp before you go there.

I spoke with Facebook platform engineering lead Mike Vernal at f8 yesterday about instant personalization after having trouble grokking the concept when CEO Mark Zuckerberg threw it in as a “one last thing” during his f8 keynote. Vernal described the goal as that of creating a “magical” experience for users. However, he said Facebook is well aware that these privileges could be abused. “We’ve very cognizant of balancing building great user experiences and respecting privacy,” was how Vernal put it.

Vernal said Facebook has not finalized any plans for allowing additional sites into the instant personalization program. Users are also able to opt out entirely via a new option found at the bottom of the list on their privacy settings page. And further, if they want to prevent their friends from sharing their information with an instant personalization partner, users must block that specific application individually. Multiple Facebook employees told me the company was unsure about how to label the sensitive product and which partners were launching on it until the last minute.

I made this just for you

The problem is, users aren’t accustomed to instantly personal services, and we have no idea where that personal information is coming from. Going back to the relatively benign social plugins from the beginning of this story, it probably won’t be obvious to the casual visitor to CNN.com that CNN doesn’t know anything about the story recommendations Facebook is providing. To most of us, it will look like CNN knows who we are. And further, while going to a brand-new website that instantly knows who you are might ultimately be useful, the first time it happens you’re going to freak out.

Facebook’s way of addressing that reaction is by placing an icon in every social plugin that leads back to an explanation on Facebook, and layering a big blue bar on top of the three sites — again, Microsoft’s Docs.com, Pandora and Yelp — that are getting the special treatment. So when I go to Yelp today I’m greeted right up front with: “Hi Liz. Yelp is using Facebook to personalize your experience. Learn More – No Thanks.” That’s fine, but the fact is, this tool is designed to help users become acquainted with sites they’ve never been to before. So the experience is necessarily going to be foreign.

I recently signed up for a new web photo service by giving an email address and password. When I went to fill out my profile, there was already a picture of me staring back. Whoa. That’s useful, I guess — I didn’t have to find a headshot to upload yet again — but it weirded me out. It turned out the site was probably using Automattic’s (see disclosure below) Gravatar, to match my email with my profile pic. Clearly, Facebook’s not the only platform that wants to enable shortcuts to make my new web experiences better — expect this instant personalization to catch on, if users and privacy advocates don’t revolt and drive the company to drop the feature. We saw that happen with a cousin of this product, Facebook Beacon, three years ago.

But if my Facebook stream is any indication, some users have already caught onto this latest privacy tweak. Here’s one message making the rounds:

“Do NOT forget to OPT OUT of the new FB Instant Personalization sillyness. Under your Privacy Settings so 3rd parties cannot collect your personal data. Account–>Privacy Settings–>Applications & Websites–>@bottom is the Instant Personalization thing–>Uncheck Allow.”

But then, lots of people just hate change; every Facebook redesign, ever, has been protested. And so, like Facebook, we’ll have to wait to see how much instant personalization freaks people out.

Disclosure: Automattic, maker of WordPress.com, is backed by True Ventures, a venture capital firm that is an investor in the parent company of this blog, Giga Omni Media. Om Malik, founder of Giga Omni Media, is also a venture partner at True.

Related content from GigaOM Pro (sub req’d):

How Facebook Should Fix Its Privacy Problem

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  1. Awesome, Facebook–But the Users Will Still Own the Web « Rob Hof's Blog Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] One problem is that Facebook doesn’t yet command the complete trust of its users–not even as much as Google, which has come in for a lot of its own privacy-related criticism lately. Whether it’s because of multiple privacy gaffes or Zuckerberg’s recent statement that public sharing of personal information is the new social norm, the company still has to prove it’s not going to make people uncomfortable sharing stuff on Facebook–and now, well beyond. And with privacy policies and controls so complex that many people are confused or simply ignore them, it seems likely there will be more privacy blowups to come. (Like these.) [...]

  2. After reading this, I opted out too. It’s stupid to have sites know who I am just by visiting them, and I want no part of that.

    1. Brandon Richardson Otto Sunday, April 25, 2010

      I agree Otto. But at least you have the ability to opt out.

      With http://www.dirtyphonebook.com and others of that ilk you don’t even
      have the OPTION to opt out and that’s scary to me.

      I think we need to really think about where these and location based services are going.

      1. I think Facebook should have turned that option off by default though. Or could have at least made proper announcements about the feature so that everyone knew what was going on.

  3. When social media takes over « Connection in an Isolating Age Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] social media takes over Jump to Comments According to GigaOM and the New York Times, at yesterday’s f8 conference, Facebook launched its plans to make the [...]

  4. Thank god I’m not using FB. This is insanity, and anyone who gives the slightest f*ck about maintaining their privacy should be afraid, VERY afraid of this.

  5. Facebook Instantly Sharing Your Data With Third Parties Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] may just share your data with Facebook’s trusted partners anyway! Liz Gannes at GigaOm has additional thoughts and calls this selection a, “privacy [...]

  6. It seems that you can only disable it if your language is set to US English.

  7. 127.0.0.1 facebook is now in my hosts file

    Thanks for bringing the opt out to my attention

    1. Hey steve, what do you mean? Does this block FB? Also have you checked out where you Flash Cookies are on you hard drive. Scary. Friggen internet knows everywhere I’ve been.

  8. interesting that in germany they haven’t launched yet the new instant personalization.

    Maybe because of the big anti-facebook-hype in our country due the open (‘attack’)letter to zuckerberg from our consumer protection minister Ilse Aigner?

  9. Am I the only that is not “creeped out” by instant personalization? If this services makes a website more useful and relevant for myself, I don’t mind.
    The way Facebook is going you might as well delete your facebook account if you don’t like these “innovations”.

    1. Well Daniel, the fact that your life is an open book, and you’re fine with that is ok by me. On the other hand, I suppose we should go back to the gold standard since you’re a fan of Ron Paul? To me that’s crazy and irresponsible. And guess what, I’m assuming you’re crazy and irresponsible too, since you’re his fan, or whatever you call it on FB. Maybe I’m mistaken, but that’s what happens when your life is an open book, right?

    2. I tend to agree with Daniel, but I don’t like when FB sets applications like “instant personalization” ON as a default.
      They should let me know about the service, and let me decide whether I want to join it or not.

    3. Oddly doesn’t bother me either. I’m keep 99% of my profile set to private, and instant personalization follows those settings when sharing w/ external partners.

  10. Sanjay Maharaj Thursday, April 22, 2010

    Where do we draw the line between personalization and privacy? How much of this information is information overload? I think this is a bit scary

  11. As of today, there is a new privacy setting called “Instant Personalization” that shares data with non-facebook websites and it is automatically set to “Allow.” Go to Account > Privacy Settings > Applications and Websites and uncheck “Allow”. Please copy & repost

  12. Facebook would like to be your web god Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] Gannes explains it this way at gigaom.com: Instant personalization means that if you show up to the Internet radio site Pandora for the first [...]

  13. Your Mom’s Guide to Those Facebook Changes, and How to Block Them Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] Shuts Down Facebook Lite See All Articles » Facebook’s <i>Instant Personalization</i> Is the Real [...]

  14. Here in canada, it’s an opt-in rather than an opt-out…

  15. The Day’s Delicious – Patchchord.com Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] Facebook’s Instant Personalization Is the Real Privacy Hairball: So…how personal is too personal? Time will tell and once again, it's Facebook pushing [...]

  16. It’s not that we hate change. We hate change where the default is to invade privacy. I don’t mind yielding that privacy but someone else just giving it away without asking is theft. Google Buzz is a great example: evil == gone.

  17. Sounds creepy… What’s stopping someone from turning their website into Hal…

    Dave…

    Dave…

    Please Enter Your Credit Card Dave…

    (I would opt-out, but I haven’t signed up yet.)

  18. Studies have shown that users want a personalized experience on the web and Yelp and Pandora are natural choices for this. The problem for me is that the internet loses its weirdness and becomes bland when every site starts looking for things that my friends like, I want to be able to find something new. Also, I worry about Fb handling the secruity aspect of this correctly.

    I will disable for now but will continue to watch this because if implemented correctly I think it could provide a lot of value.

  19. Facebook’s quickly becoming despicable. I, for one, am becoming a Facebook minimalist and might quit altogether. These guys need to know that we care about our privacy and won’t be stomped on.

  20. William Vambenepe — Data too sensitive to leak from Facebook is too sensitive to be on Facebook Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] your Facebook privacy settings right now” messages recently swept through Twitter and blogs. As also happened a few months ago, when Facebook last modified some privacy settings to better [...]

  21. Impact Of Facebook Feature Changes & India Tie Ups | Iphone India Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] instant social experience. GigaOm has a nice article on it (with a much more deailed explanation). There’s also a good article on how this affects [...]

  22. If you don’t uncheck “What your friends can share about you” options then your info is still shared through your friends account. Everything but relationship details and religious views are checked by default. I am unchecking mine until I see how it works and, would it be so hard for them to put a big button to opt-in or opt-out on the home page. Seems like it would clear up a lot of confusion and not cause a controversy.

  23. Facebook’s Instant Personalization: The Real Privacy Problem Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] Facebook frame onto a page, instantly make that page social. So, for example, if you visit CNN.com, you could see what news stories your friends liked and shared there. CNN doesn’t actually see that happening — to the news org it’s just a box it leaves open on its site for Facebook to populate — but it’s presumably happy because users get a more personal experience and stick around longer. And users don’t get identified for simply visiting a site; they have to log in to Facebook through a dialog box in order for their presence and activities to be shared with their Facebook friends. Facebook also introduced a way for certain sites to push this further than everyone else. Three carefully chosen launch partners — Microsoft’s Docs.com, Yelp and Read ahead [...]

  24. Linkwertig: Facebook, Xing, YouTube, Internet » netzwertig.com Thursday, April 22, 2010

    [...] » Facebook’s Instant Personalization Is the Real Privacy Hairball [...]

  25. Understanding Facebook’s New Instant Personalzation | Ultimate Internet Privacy Guide Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] Personalization: Facebook’s official page on Social plugins and Instant Personalization Facebook’s Instant Personalizaiton Is The Real Privacy Hairball Did you like this article? Consider sharing it on Google or Facebook below    [...]

  26. Facebook vs Datenschutz: Diese Facebook-Einstellungen solltest Du jetzt überprüfen » t3n News Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] Zugang zu den Daten bekommen. Doch bei einigen Websites erlaubt Facebook etwas mehr. Mit der „Instant Personalization“ bekommen die Websitebesucher von Doc.com, Pandora und Yelp in den USA schon jetzt personalisierte [...]

  27. I’ve always been interested in privacy, but never really worried because we all are hiding among the masses of users. This thing, however, really bugs me, and it got me to wrap my first layer of foil around my head. I tweaked my FF with Noscript and Cookie whitelist, basically blocking everything that I don’t need. FB is still open all the time, but I’m using a different browser for it.

    And finally, I do not want a personalized internet. Like someone here put it well, internet loses it’s weirdness.

  28. Facebook has another shot at killing Privacy shock horror….. – broadstuff Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] has been written about it already and its teh same old Facebook wheeze in a new bottle – so here is the ever sharp Liz Gannes: Three carefully chosen launch partners — Microsoft’s Docs.com, Yelp and Pandora — have [...]

  29. facebook changes from opt-out to opt-in for instant personalization, but all’s not right…. « first conclusions Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] but all’s not right…. 2010/04/23 — anna Well after all the hullabaloo regarding Facebook’s convoluted opt-out steps, they’ve switched it up that users now [...]

  30. For me, the cost-benefit doesn’t stack up. As an averagely experienced web-user I am able to winnow out items of interest without this assistance, and I like to discover new things that could not be predicted from my profile. I would get quickly bored of all my favourite topics and songs were they to appear on every website. The benefits seem doubtful.

    The potential cost is that holes appear in the security either through my human error or hacker resourcefulness, and my privacy and identity is compromised.

    Can we not just let the monkey happily browse the jungle at his leisure instead of firing bananas at him through a cannon?

  31. You had a nice article here, right up to the end where you blew it:

    “But then, lots of people just hate change”

    First, that isn’t journalism, it’s generalizing and opinionated. Second, it’s completely inaccurate. I have no problem with the exploration of new technologies or uses there-of. I think it’s actually a good idea that FaceBook pursued this and I will be interested to see where it goes and what it is capable of.

    The problem is that it is enabled by default and furthermore than users are virtually uninformed that the new service exists at all.

    Services like this should be opt-in, especially when its introduction will go completely unnoticed by most users so they have no idea they have even been signed up for the service in the first place.

    How did you miss this basic fact in your article’s conclusion?

    1. That people who use Facebook are very opposed to change isn’t hard to see. The change from “Fan” to “Like” alone has caused mass outrage.

      And they are telling people about Instant Personalization. It says so in the article right here:

      “Facebook’s way of addressing that reaction is by placing an icon in every social plugin that leads back to an explanation on Facebook, and layering a big blue bar on top of the three sites — again, Microsoft’s Docs.com, Pandora and Yelp — that are getting the special treatment. So when I go to Yelp today I’m greeted right up front with: “Hi Liz. Yelp is using Facebook to personalize your experience. Learn More-No Thanks”

  32. Facebook: Die Geister, die es rief » netzwertig.com Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] scheint Facebook bereits auf die aufflammende Kritik reagiert zu haben: Die umstrittene Funktion, mit der Facebook bisher drei ausgewählte Partnerseiten vorab und ohne vorherige Rückfrage beim [...]

  33. Why didn’t my previous comment appear?

    1. Sorry, please disregard this thread

  34. So, as you mentioned, in teeeeensy tiny grey lettering it says “Please keep in mind that if you opt out, your friends may still share public Facebook information about you to personalize their experience on these partner sites unless you block the application.”

    How does one go about doing this? I can’t find anything on FB about blocking this particular application.

  35. This Week in Review: Facebook’s big move, the iPad’s news app control, and a future for hard reporting » Nieman Journalism Lab Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] web.” Liz Gannes said Facebook’s asking for a lot of trust from developers and later pinpointed its “instant personalization” as the main privacy problem. Both Dave Winer and Robert [...]

  36. Guy At HockeyBias dot com Friday, April 23, 2010

    Thanks for referencing the ‘opt out’ feature…

  37. I don’t see what all the damn fuss is about. Instant Personalization only allows sites to parse your PUBLIC PROFILE. Prior to this, if my site had your email address (as many do), and your email is searchable on facebook (as many are), I could’ve scripted the same functionality. If you’re that concerned about privacy, lock down your public profile.

    1. I, and no doubt plenty of others use a throwaway email for sites like yours, so you wouldn’t be able to link it to one’s FB account. And there are plenty of sites that do not have my email. So yes, this is a BIG deal.

  38. Your Mom’s Guide to Those Facebook Changes, and How to Block Them | Gadget Public Informations Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] fairly impressive new features and services at its recent f8 conference, but some of them were also more than just a little scary. Since a lot of what the company talked about was introduced in either “developer [...]

  39. i don t understand what is it exactly!!!!!!

  40. Sardar Mohkim Khan Friday, April 23, 2010

    This would cause Facebook dearly. We have seen quite a few people already opt out who had been advocating a ‘more social web’. But this present move is simply very ambitious and offensive if i can put it that way.

  41. I can’t decide if I care about this one. Most of my Facebook content is locked down to friends-only or friends of friends for some stuff. So these sites aren’t pulling my restaurant commentary for my friends, as I understand it. But I just jumped on Yelp, and I can tell that it’s pulling from one of my friends in particular, who must have her status updates set to public, I’m thinking? And I suppose that’s of interest, and she was posting in publicly anyway. So it’s just aggregating already public info.

    The one thing that is creepy is Yelp recognizing me before I’ve even signed in. That’s a little much. I do prefer to have to manually choose to link websites.

  42. Can I trust companies with personal details or private issues?

    What will happen to my interests when they are looking at their last cents and people make and offer for the information?

    But I am confused by all these… Is it that if you never used an application, nobody will get any more personal stuffs from you?

  43. Your Mom’s Guide to Those Facebook Changes, and How to Block Them | Hawaii Wedding Photography Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] fairly impressive new features and services at its recent f8 conference, but some of them were also more than just a little scary. Since a lot of what the company talked about was introduced in either “developer speak” — [...]

  44. DigitWord.com » Facebook’s Instant Personalization Raises Even More Privacy Concerns Friday, April 23, 2010

    [...] iceberg. Liz Gannes at GigaOM gave an example of how this new custom experience works in creepy and potentially alarming ways. Gannes gives the example of visiting Yelp for the first time. Now, the Instant Personalization [...]

  45. Facebook’s Instant Personalization Raises Even More Privacy Concerns | Death By Cucumber | Great News In No Time Saturday, April 24, 2010

    [...] The idea is simple enough. Websites embed a simple widget on their page that automatically pulls in information related to the site from a person’s Facebook account. Primarily, this comes in the form of a list of people who have “liked” or shared an article, song or movie, but Mark Zuckerberg hinted that this was only the tip of the personalization iceberg. Liz Gannes at GigaOM gave an example of how this new custom experience works in creepy and potentially alarming ways. [...]

  46. Facebooks neue Strategie « Bits of Freedom Saturday, April 24, 2010

    [...] Es meiner Ansicht nach zu begrüßen, das Google endlich mal ernsthafte Konkurrenz bekommt. Aber so eine Konkurrenz? Wenn die Pläne von Facebook aufgehen, und die meisten User dauernd dort [...]

  47. I deleted my profile after a friend told me about it.
    The way I approached the matter is not through the “so what” idea but actually I asked myself, why is it so important to facebook to “leak” information out? I mean, fair enough you can disable it, but why shouldn’t I be the one to actually enable this? Why is it so important to this “networking service” to manage to leak information out, even just for a few seconds i click disable?
    I never received any message saying, Btw huey we have this new feature which can enable and it does this and that. All i got was a friend saying that, btw guys, if you don’t want this then do this and that.
    And I’m sorry but just because we are not paying customers we shouldn’t be taken for granted.

  48. I also opted out. I think it is CRAZY to have a site track your surfing habit, absolutely crazy. Inside FB, track me all you want, outside leave me alone. I can’t wait until the first fall out comes from unsuspecting FB users who have unwanted page links sent back to their wall and then to all their friends.

  49. Perhaps it’s already been mentioned, but Yahoo Launchcast was similiar to Pandora in some ways, and I think it may have existed first.

  50. Facebook and Privacy – Why Do I Need to Keep Opting Out of Stuff? « Make This Do – Making The Web Work For You Sunday, April 25, 2010

    [...] Gigaom.com gave the best example: Instant personalization means that if you show up to the Internet radio site Pandora for the first [...]

  51. Facebook’s Instant Personalization Raises Even More Privacy Concerns | Everything's Social Sunday, April 25, 2010

    [...] The idea is simple enough. Websites embed a simple widget on their page that automatically pulls in information related to the site from a person’s Facebook account. Primarily, this comes in the form of a list of people who have “liked” or shared an article, song or movie, but Mark Zuckerberg hinted that this was only the tip of the personalization iceberg. Liz Gannes at GigaOM gave an example of how this new custom experience works in creepy and potentially alarming ways. [...]

  52. Facebook ‘Like’ Plug-in Sparks Privacy Concerns | eWEEK Europe UK Monday, April 26, 2010

    [...] Liz Gannes described it well: “Instant personalisation means that if you show up to the Internet radio site Pandora for [...]

  53. There’s a number of resources my friends and I are actively using. So for me this new Facebook feature is really cool as I can view what my friends have commented or share the news by clicking the only button.

  54. Facebook Takes Fire From Senators Over Privacy Tuesday, April 27, 2010

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  55. Facebook Takes Fire From Senators Over Privacy | Gadget Public Informations Tuesday, April 27, 2010

    [...] at its f8 conference, including social plugins for websites, an open graph protocol and a so-called “instant personalization” feature that’s being implemented on several sites, including Microsoft’s Docs.com and [...]

  56. Maybe my friends don’t have a clue on how to share my info? I mean, most of them are my relatives and people that I have known for years.. And I’m pretty good at knowing what sites to go to. Or does this only work if your on your facebook at the same time as browsing the net?

  57. Facebook’s Former Privacy Officer, Now AG Candidate, Slams New Features – A Collection of Latest Happening in Technology Field Monday, May 3, 2010

    [...] partners, including Microsoft, the music-sharing service Pandora and review site Yelp.com — goes the farthest of any of the new Facebook features in terms of sharing data without explicitly asking users [...]

  58. jason fager – Quitting Facebook Wednesday, May 5, 2010

    [...] itself as a place to interact with friends in a semi-walled garden. Since that time, the wall has come down, and the company seems to have settled pretty firmly on being [...]

  59. The Relationship Between Facebook and Privacy: It’s Really Complicated Thursday, May 6, 2010

    [...] complaint specifically mentions the “instant personalization” feature that allows Microsoft’s Doc.com, Yelp, and Pandora to personalize their services when a user [...]

  60. Facebook’s Disconnect: Open Doors, Closed Exits | Venture Capital & Angel Investors Lists News and Jobs Saturday, May 8, 2010

    [...] make while they stay on Facebook.com — and who could be justifiably upset when they find out the full extent of [...]

  61. Why Everyone Should Be Concerned About Their Facebook Privacy « KieferFeed Sunday, May 9, 2010

    [...] Facebook introduced a new “instant personalization” feature, which allows a site to instantly access your user data to customize it to you. Users are automatically opted into this program and have to manually opt [...]

  62. Daniel Hooker – My work, life and writing Sunday, May 9, 2010

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  63. Facebook Privacy Link Collection « FB Watch – Watching Facebook Sunday, May 9, 2010

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  64. Facebook Links That You NEED to Know « Stuff You Read Online Monday, May 10, 2010

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  65. Facebook, Privacy, Public Opinion and Pitchforks « 33 Bits of Entropy Monday, May 10, 2010

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  66. Protect Yourself Against Facebook’s New Opening For Hackers | Defamer Australia Tuesday, May 11, 2010

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  67. Facebook Needs to Find Its Voice on Privacy Wednesday, May 12, 2010

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  68. Facebook Calls “All Hands On Deck!” Meeting | PCMech Thursday, May 13, 2010

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  69. The Subscription Model: How Facebook Can Make Money and Still Respect Users … – BNET | business.gnom.es Thursday, May 13, 2010

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  70. Review: Facebook’s Privacy Issues Tuesday, May 18, 2010

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  71. Seven Reasons to Quit Facebook that Aren’t Related to Your Privacy | Living Without Facebook Wednesday, May 19, 2010

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  72. Uproar on Facebook Privacy & New tool to set your privacy « Social Wisdom Thursday, May 20, 2010

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  74. For Facebook, the Privacy Snowball Just Keeps on Rolling « WTI NewsBlog Friday, May 21, 2010

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  75. Will Zuckerberg’s Mea Culpa Turn the Tide for Facebook on Privacy? Monday, May 24, 2010

    [...] mention one of the most contentious aspects of the company’s new settings — the “instant personalization” feature that was rolled out at the recent F8 conference, and to which users were opted-in by [...]

  76. the new feature is fine, but the big mistake they made was making it opt-out instead of opt-in. that’s what killed beacon, and that’s what will kill instant personalization.

  77. Does Facebook Have a Fatal Cultural Problem? Wednesday, May 26, 2010

    [...] the social network could have implemented its new features in a more open way — including not opting people in by default — and communicated better. But this is not the first time, or even the second time, that [...]

  78. Facebook’s New Privacy Settings: Here’s What Changed Wednesday, May 26, 2010

    [...] to share your information with other applications. You can also more clearly opt out of the new instant personalization feature. Lastly, in the coming month, outside applications will have to ask for items of your [...]

  79. Privacy Source » Facebook Addresses Several Privacy Problems (ACLU) Thursday, May 27, 2010

    [...] transition” that took away privacy controls to “instant personalization” that instantly shares personal information with third party pages without the user’s [...]

  80. Broadband Has Turned Our Homes Into Glass Houses Saturday, May 29, 2010

    [...] pretty high for businesses. Plus, the expectation that has developed around the Internet is that it’s easy to sign up and share information, but you need to clearly tell people what’s happening and offer them a way out before they [...]

  81. I was creeped out by the same thing as you were — instant personalization via Facebook ID, overriding all my specific subscriptions. I immediatly learned how to privatize FB because I don’t like someone else reveailing my info. (I use an aka everywhere, and reveal little)

    Then they came up with an additional privatizing push — was it last week ? and I again reviewed that my settings were “only me.” Imagine hw I felt when I saw my FB name suddenly on websites again yesterday, despite my being virtually totally private!

    Another creepy thing is Google’s Picasa’s face recognition, where you can identify all the people in your photos ONLY by their email in your gmail list! No doubt Google will then connect their faces and compromise THEIR identities too.

    So much for First Amendment rights! Nothing can be private and personal any more. 1984 30 years late.

  82. This Week in Review: Facebook’s big move, the iPad’s news app control, and a future for hard reporting | Mark Coddington Tuesday, June 1, 2010

    [...] for the web.” Liz Gannes said Facebook’s asking for a lot of trust from developers and later pinpointed its “instant personalization” as the main privacy problem. Both Dave Winer and Robert Scoble [...]

  83. An immediate solution for many to these concerns (in addition to opting out of instant personalization) is to just log out of Facebook when you’re done. This prevents Facebook from getting “pinged” any time you visit a site with a social plugin, which you currently can’t opt out of. It’s a small step, but it keeps Facebook from looking over your shoulder at everything else you do online, which it then connects to all the information it has about you and your friends and family.

    Join our Facebook group to join the movement and access updates on these issues. And tell your friends. Let’s take back our privacy! Just log out!

    Group: “Just Log Out”
    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=122773054424144

  84. Why I’m Deleting My Facebook Account – in medias res Thursday, June 3, 2010

    [...] tried Beacon, their first siege against users’ privacy. More recently they’ve added Instant Personalization, another major privacy coup. Whereas Beacon would post to Facebook your activities on other [...]

  85. Facebook Reactivates Instant Personalization Partner Program: Tech News « Friday, September 17, 2010

    [...] Facebook today is rolling out its fourth instant personalization parter and the only one since the initial launch in April. The program was highly controversial because it customizes a user’s experience of a partner [...]

  86. Financial Planning Tuesday, September 28, 2010

    This is insanity, and anyone who gives the slightest f*ck about maintaining their privacy should be afraid, VERY afraid of this.

  87. I think it’s pathetic that people are making such a fuss about this as if their personal details have been spilled across the stratosphere.

    It merely pulls information from your public profile, which is visible to people anyway. It’s not sharing it with anyone else, it’s not storing it, it’s not selling it, or it’s not compromising your information in any way.

    People are happy to post on forums and blogs and give their name/IP/email/website to the webmaster, yet when their name and friendlist (which is publically available) is made visible on a trusted website VIA the facebook API, people claim it’s a huge privacy issue.

    Am I missing something here? Can someone fill me in with any possible negative consequence that this new feature could surface?

  88. Bing Launches Facebook Instant Personalization: Tech News « Wednesday, October 13, 2010

    [...] if a user is logged into Facebook, an implementation the company’s controversial “instant personalization” product. The module shows up higher in the page if Bing thinks the social results are [...]

  89. Leo Tabibzadegan Saturday, November 20, 2010

    I personally love the idea of the Instant Personalization!

    Life is just too short to have it any other way. The thing about social media is that it is like a glass house. It allows people to see what is going on inside in a truthful way. It… creates a sense of Radical Honesty which is the key ingredient for progressive change.

    I’m sure the technology will be abused by dishonest money hungry advertisers and businesses. But realistically those old ways of thinking are falling apart. Good old honesty, integirity, and value is overpowering old and confused systems.

    It also plays well with Pandora which is a great new feature in my new navigation system, making life much easier! :)

  90. Facebook: Personvernets tid er over | Digital Monday, December 20, 2010

    [...] Umiddelbar personalisering (Instant personalisation): Facebook tester ut et nytt program som lar et par tidlige samarbeidspartnere, Yelp, Microsoft og  Pandora, se profilinformasjon når brukerne er logget inn. Ideene er at når du bruker tjenestene til et av de nevnte selskapene vil tjenesten kunne se Facebookprofilen din og bruke offentlig tilgjengelig informasjon fra den – navn, profilbilde, kjønn og navn på vennene dine, pluss alt annet du har gjort offentlig – til å gi deg en personalisert opplevelse. [...]

  91. Instant Personalization is not instantly enabled. You have to login to a partner site with you facebook credentials and allow the site to integrate your profile.

    It’s not a bad idea considering the amount of time spent by most users on fb, average of 5 hours per user each day (Yikes!!). This option allows you to integrate your lifestyle on certain websites IF you choose to login with your facebook account info.

  92. This guy has an interesting take on Facebook Privacy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1b7nuo55k8

  93. Is anyone else upset that “instant personalization” is automatically “enabled” to share your info without you oking it first? Equally upsetting is there’s no way to contact and complain to FB personnel, offices, etc.-no “contact us”, but FB wants to let unwanteds contact me!

    Love FB, but come on-respect your users!

  94. Facebook 'Instant personalization' launches: How to disable it, and why | ZDNet Wednesday, February 2, 2011

    [...] been able to access the instant personalisation feature yet, it turns on today. More worryingly, it is turned on by default so many will be entirely unaware the feature even [...]

  95. February 2, 2011 “Is The Military Paid Too Much??” « The OFNetwork Update Wednesday, February 2, 2011

    [...] been able to access the instant personalization feature yet, it turns on today. More worryingly, it is turned on by default so many will be entirely unaware the feature even exists.  This, plus the recently introduced [...]

  96. 4,000+ people like this. Wow.

  97. Facebook 101 Business Guide « ClearPoint Web Solutions Monday, February 7, 2011

    [...] Yet, mostly, this pushback has been things like the Beacon fiasco and, more recently, the Instant Personalization feature. The fact is, Facebook offers extremely granular privacy settings so for every piece of [...]

  98. Facebook instant personalization: How to disable it, and why « Knowledge Dispensary Wednesday, February 16, 2011

    [...] many have not been able to access the instant personalisation feature yet, many have found that it is turned on by default so many will be entirely unaware the feature even [...]

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