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Since we didn’t get early access, but WSJ did and wrote two long stories on it, we can only make it easier for you to digest those. Hence th…

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Since we didn’t get early access, but WSJ did and wrote two long stories on it, we can only make it easier for you to digest those. Hence the cheat sheet:

– Michael Bloomberg was keen on buying BusinessWeek, after Bloomberg News broke the story about BW hiring Evercore as its banker.

– Bloomberg execs explored buying BusinessWeek in late 2008, 6 months before McGraw-Hill (NYSE: MHP) acknowledged the mag was for sale, but passed on it after the global economic crisis.

– Bloomberg name gets equal billing on the BW cover, a switch from the tiny font added to the title last December. Looks a bit like The Economist, which Norman Pearlstine, Bloomberg’s chief content officer, is a big fan of.

– Double the number of stories per issue, but many articles written by Bloomberg’s fleet of 2,300 journalists. After the cuts, the mag was only left with three NY-based writers.

– Bloomberg has committed to a minimum 66 news pages each issue, up from about 55.

– The new mag has five sections: economics, companies, politics and policy, technology, and markets. The sections often contain re-edited Bloomberg stories.

Bloomberg BusinessWeek, which has a weekly circulation of 900,000, plans to give away 200,000 copies, including from online requests for free sample issues.

– Bloomberg has cut BW‘s losses by a large extent, it says. Mainly through job cuts and office closures. The mag has fewer than 300 employees, down from about 400 in October.

  1. Looking forward to picking up the new Business Week and see what’s changed. One thing is for sure: Business Week is a globally recognized business publication brand — content publication aside, this may become another good marketing vehicle for Bloomberg a la Bloomberg TV.

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