3 Comments

Summary:

A common sentiment from iPad owners is that it is easier to type on the virtual (on-screen) keyboard than people thought it would be. Typing on the iPad is like anything else, a little practice makes perfect. That’s where TapTyping from Flairify comes in handy.

TapTyping test

A common sentiment I hear from iPad owners is that it is easier to type on the virtual (on-screen) keyboard than people thought it would be. I am firmly in that camp as I have written a lot of things on the iPad, far more than I thought I would be able to do comfortably on the on-screen keyboard. Typing on the iPad is like anything else, a little practice can go a long way to improving the skill. That’s where TapTyping from Flairify comes in handy.

This cheap ($5.99) app for the iPad presents a series of typing lessons that is aimed at improving both typing speed and accuracy. It starts out with presenting a series of letters for typing, and progresses to more extensive lessons that has the user entering famous works like the Alice in Wonderland. To keep things fresh you can enter your Twitter credentials and TapTyping will have you practice by typing in the tweets from your friends. The program shows your time and accuracy at the end of each lesson.

I have only spent a short time with TapTyping but find my skill is already improving. I intend to go through the whole program and see how fast I can get using the on-screen keys. TapTyping works in both portrait and landscape orientation, but it’s primarily designed to improved two-handed typing so landscape works better.

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  1. Hashish Jihadi Tuesday, April 20, 2010

    The iPad is great for meetings. It has no fan and nobody can hear you texting while the boss is yawning everyone to sleep with his quarterly numbers.

  2. I can see where the landscape mode of the iPad’s keyboard might be okay for short spurts of email correspondence, but I’m trying to imagine the comfort level of having the screen and keyboard at the same angle while typing anything longer in say, its iWork software.

    Fair to say that the modern equivalent of ‘War and Peace'(or a detailed spreadsheet) isn’t comfortably possible?

    1. Spreadsheet yes, War and Peace no. I have typed more than 1,000 word pieces with little problem though.

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