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Summary:

At home, I fancy myself an amateur photographer with a decent array of prosumer Canon products. I take on average 25K photos annually and spend a good amount of time organizing, printing and getting creative with the image library I have managed to create.

Geoffrey L. Goetz

Geoffrey L. Goetz

An overwhelming feeling of “Jamais Vu” is how I would best describe the experience of re-entering both the mobile as well as the development scenes since the advent of Apple’s iPhone SDK.  Ground breaking new technology, ever-expanding features and capabilities in each new SDK.  Innovative and hip company in Silicon Valley calling all the shots. And like a moth to a flame I just have to be there no matter what. Writing about it, speaking about it, teaching, mentoring, and building solutions with it.

That was me in a nutshell back in 1997 when Java took off and Borland was the hip company in Silicon Valley (actually Scott’s Valley, on the other side of the mountain, but close enough) that I could not help but fall in love with.  Everything then feels like everything now, and is best described in Geoffrey Moore’s Crossing the Chasm.

I may have cut my teeth on a Commodore in grade school, but Apple has been the dominate computing platform throughout my education.  Upon entering the corporate world, it was all Mainframe, Unix, Microsoft and even OS/2.  Then with Java and the JBuilder IDE from Borland, I slowly started to re-enter the Apple platform professionally.  I now live in a completely Mac household, work day in and day out solely on Macs, developing applications for the iPhone and other mobile platforms.

At home, I fancy myself an amateur photographer with a decent array of prosumer Canon products.  I take on average 25K photos annually and spend a good amount of time organizing, printing and getting creative with the image library I have managed to create.  The subjects in the majority of the photos I take are my two children, who are also growing up Mac.  My now six-year-old received her first iMac at the age of three, and my two-year old is perfectly at home watching his favorite YouTube videos of trains and race cars on either the iPhone or iPad.

So what has changed?  Why are things different now compared to then?  I wish I knew exactly, it just feels very different somehow.  Hopefully blogging about it will help me figure it out.

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  1. Tom Reestman Monday, April 19, 2010

    Welcome aboard.

    No article yet?

    Slacker. :)

  2. Awesome Geoffrey! Glad to hear of your love for photography and old school silicon valley roots.

    Do you upload your photos on Flickr or another site? I’d love to check them out. Welcome!

  3. Actually it feels very much like 1990 again with Apple, we will see how it all turns out. Welcome aboard and I look forward to your future postings.

  4. Geoffrey Goetz Tuesday, April 20, 2010

    First post up now. Slack time over. :-)

    I do plan on posting images from photos I take in reference to the articles I write. And over time it will hopefully grow into a nice gallery.

    1990 here again in 2010. One thing that is different is that the gadgets are cooler. And there are more of them!

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