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Summary:

Adobe today announced the launch of the latest version of its Creative Suite collection of products, CS5. The family of tools comprises, among other things, new versions of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Acrobat, Fireworks and Dreamweaver.

Adobe today announced the launch of the latest version of its flagship Creative Suite family of products, CS5. It comprises, among other things, new versions of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Acrobat, Fireworks, Flash and Dreamweaver.

The latest versions of the software have 64-bit support and some neat new productivity-boosting features. In particular, the new content-aware fill available in Photoshop CS5 looks very impressive. Check out this video showing it in action:

The Creative Suite of tools is an impressive collection of professional-grade software, but that quality does come at a price. The top-of-the-range Master Collection, which includes all of the tools in the CS5 family, retails at a hefty $2,599, while the cheapest edition, Design Standard, which includes Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Acrobat, costs $1,299. Tiered upgrade pricing from previous versions of the software is available.

Will you be upgrading to CS5?

Related GigaOM Pro content (sub. req.): Enabling the Web Work Revolution

  1. They want another $900 for me to upgrade from CS4 master collection to CS5 master collection, after I just paid $900(student discount) for CS4 master collection last month?! Yeah, right.

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  2. Damir Kostanjski Monday, April 12, 2010

    Yeah, right. This was a nice introduction. Especially the icons of the applications. They are still the same, squared, fantasy-less and boring. They don’t match the new features which are introduced. So people will think that Adobe did not improved so much. I hope that the applications specially Flash CS5 will not crash so much as CS4 did.

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  3. I don’t want to get it but I have to. The CS series has become a very expensive subscription and not software. You basically have to pay a yearly subscription of $700 to keep using the software. It’s becoming insane

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  4. Selling annual upgrades to developers has proven to be a workable business model for Macromedia, and now Adobe. An important part of the payment ensures that key plugins such as Flash and Acrobat are free to the end user.

    With high profile platforms like the iPhone and iPad blocking Flash, however, the value we get out of the payment is being degraded.

    Will I buy? – Yes, Flash is still important enough to my business that I can justify having a relatively up-to-date version.

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  5. [...] if you love to hate Adobe products, CS5 does not disappoint, it’s pretty fantastic actually (VIDEO via [...]

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  6. [...] if you love to hate Adobe prod­ucts, CS5 does not dis­ap­point, it’s pretty fan­tas­tic actu­ally (VIDEO via [...]

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  7. thats perfect:)

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