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Summary:

Facebook has acquired the group photo-sharing site Divvyshot, a three-person team that will shut down its product and work on Facebook Photos as engineers. Divvyshot was a beautiful product that launched to the public in February after participating last year in the Y Combinator program.

Facebook has acquired the group photo-sharing startup Divvyshot, a three-person team that will shut down its product and work on Facebook Photos as engineers. Divvyshot was an appealingly designed product that only launched to the public in February after participating last year in the Y Combinator program.

According to a landing post on Divvyshot,

Divvyshot will begin winding down operations as of today. Existing users can continue to use Divvyshot; however no new accounts will be issued and our iPhone application will no longer be available for download. We’ve always given users access to their original-resolution photos and we hope that this feature will make the transition off Divvyshot easier.”

Photo via Divvyshot blog

Facebook is the world’s largest photo-sharing site with more than 2.5 billion photos uploaded per month. It doesn’t have much in the way of features but just storing and serving photos is a major feat. Earlier this month the company bumped up photo sizes by 20 percent, but personally I’d love to see a better premium photo archive solution, even for a price.

By contrast, Divvyshot had low hundreds of thousands of photos, but it had a nice drag-and-drop interface and brought together repositories of images taken by different people at group events. That’s a great function and one that few photo sites offer today.

Please see the disclosure about Facebook in my bio.

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  1. 2.5 BILLION per month…not million

    1. Darn, thought I caught that before it went out to RSS. Hate that typo. :(

  2. Congrats to the DivvyShot team! For those looking for a wedding specific solution, The Wedding Lens lets the bridge and groom collect all their guests photos into a single online photo album. We’ve been around for a couple years now and brides love our service.

    1. Thanks Justin. I think that is a totally useful service. However I had some friends who used the Wedding Lens last year and I found it hard to sort through the piles of very similar photos. It was also awkward because when they first sent it out there were very few photos, but it wasn’t the kind of thing I would check back on too often. I’m sure these are things you’re already thinking about for your product, but just my feedback.

  3. Liz,

    I’ve never paid for any online application, except for web hosting. However, I’ve told my wife many many times that if facebook offered a premium photo hosting service, I’d pay for that in a second.

  4. Cool for Divvyshot but seems like a lot of other people are doing similar things, if not more. Clixtr is another photo sharing service that leverages location and allows for exploration and group photo sharing. It’s for iPhone and web. http://www.clixtr.com/iphone

  5. Social Milestone » Blog Archive » Facebook Acquires Photo Site Divvyshot Saturday, April 3, 2010
  6. It is too bad they are closing down. I guess it is good for the founders, but not for the users of the site.

  7. Is there a photo scanner that's good for scanning negatives of odd sizes? Sunday, April 4, 2010

    [...] Facebook Acquires Photo Site Divvyshot [...]

  8. With Foursquare Out of the Picture, Facebook Buys Nextstop Thursday, July 8, 2010

    [...] FriendFeed, Facebook’s other acquisitions include Divvyshot, Octazen and Parakey, all of which were primarily based on engineering talent and domain [...]

  9. Facebook to Mentor Y Combinator Startups Friday, August 27, 2010

    [...] manager on Facebook Platform after his company Nextstop was acquired) noted Facebook recently bought the YC company Divvyshot, and complimented social integrations at YC alums Scribd and Justin.tv. [...]

  10. AngelList Designates Scouts to Refer New Startup Deals Tuesday, August 31, 2010

    [...] and enthusiasts. They include Sam Odio, CEO of Divvyshot (which was funded by AngelList and later bought by Facebook) in Silicon Valley, J. Grubb, co-founder of Get Satisfaction now based in Los Angeles, and Harper [...]

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