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So Ryan Lawler plum wore himself out this morning by discussing what video sites, including NBC, ABC and Netflix, may not be iPad compatible when the device hits stores this Saturday. Which leaves me to come tell you that Apple has now posted their own guide […]

So Ryan Lawler plum wore himself out this morning by discussing what video sites, including NBC, ABC and Netflix, may not be iPad compatible when the device hits stores this Saturday. Which leaves me to come tell you that Apple has now posted their own guide to iPad-ready web destinations.

Presented under the context of highlighting the iPad’s use of Safari as its primary browser, the list ranges from CNN to Virgin American to Major League Baseball to TED.com — the key issue being each site’s HTML5 video compatibility. Not all videos are promised to be viewable though: Vimeo’s player “displays most videos on iPad” (emphasis mine). Meanwhile, only “recently published video” on Time.com will be compatible.

On this same page, Apple is encouraging sites to submit for inclusion on the list (though no telling right now where that list will be made public). An accompanying link details how to make your site compatible, which includes tips on how to simulate iPad HTTP requests on your desktop, modifying your CSS code, and preparing for a touch screen interface.

What sites do you think would be essential to the iPad experience? What’s on your wish list that hasn’t been announced? Tell us in the comments!

Related content on NewTeeVee: The iPad Will Usher In a New Era of HTML5 Video

Related content on GigaOM Pro: The iPad: Cable TV For Publishers? (subscription required)

  1. [...] Adobe Flash isn’t supported by the iPad, those stats only include videos available through web pages that are HTML5-enabled. Considering the limited amount of web video content actually available on the iPad in these early [...]

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  2. [...] since Adobe Flash isn’t supported by the iPad, those stats only include videos available through web pages that are HTML5-enabled. Considering the limited amount of web video content actually available on the iPad in these early [...]

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  3. [...] The availability of Flash games and video on Android phones comes in stark contrast to the contentious relationship Adobe has had with Apple, which does not support Flash on its iPhone or iPad mobile devices. Instead, publishers that want to display video on those devices must use HTML5 and H.264 encoding to do so. In fact, when the iPad was released, Apple created its own list of sites that were optimized for the device. [...]

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