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Summary:

We’ve all been wondering what role exactly Apple’s iPad will play for video. Will it change the way we watch video, or underwhelm with a botched aspect ratio? How about this for a change: Method Inc. VP of Engagement John Gilles believes that the iPad, and […]

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We’ve all been wondering what role exactly Apple’s iPad will play for video. Will it change the way we watch video, or underwhelm with a botched aspect ratio? How about this for a change: Method Inc. VP of Engagement John Gilles believes that the iPad, and other yet-to-be released tablet devices, could be something like the new TV guide, offering programming choices and context while video is playing on the living room big screen.

Granted, Gilles danced a little bit around the subject of the iPad when I interviewed him about it a few weeks back at the TV of Tomorrow show (watch the complete interview embedded below the jump). That’s understandable. His company, after all, has been working with CE makers like Samsung to develop competing touch screen tablet devices. However, Method has done a lot of user research for its clients, and its results are also very telling for the place the iPad will have in the living room. Turns out, people don’t really like to have all those grids and widgets on their TV set.

Gilles made a point of saying that using widgets on a big TV set can be “disturbing” in a social setting. “People who do not have a TV remote control in their hands have to witness someone on a prolonged discovery journey,” he told me. “For the people sitting on the couch, that’s not a lot of fun.”

Method Inc. was involved in the development of Samsung’s LED TV Couple tablet component, which can be used to navigate an EPG, preview clips of shows and access various widgets. The device was first featured on Engadget last September, but hasn’t been released in the U.S. yet.

Related content on GigaOm Pro: Forecast: Tablet App Sales To Hit $8B by 2015 (subscription required)

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