12 Comments

Summary:

Online video management firm Brightcove is going after media companies that want to make their videos available on the Apple iPad by adding a whole new feature set to deliver iPad-compatible HTML5 video. The company also has unveiled a road map to eventually bring along features […]

Online video management firm Brightcove is going after media companies that want to make their videos available on the Apple iPad by adding a whole new feature set to deliver iPad-compatible HTML5 video. The company also has unveiled a road map to eventually bring along features like advertising and advanced analytics support that will make HTML5 video playback more competitive with Adobe Flash video.

As we’ve noted in the past, the iPad doesn’t support Flash, which means that web video publishers — the majority of which use the Flash player for video delivery — will have to find new ways to reach the device. Sure, they could build iPad-specific apps, but many will also want to ensure that their web video experience translates to the new device as well. HTML5 provides one way to do so, and Brightcove hopes to provide services to make it easy to target the device.

While the iPad won’t be on sale until this Saturday, April 3, Brightcove says customers like the New York Times and Time Inc. are already using the “Brightcove Experience for HTML5″ to create web sites that are custom-built to seamlessly deliver video to the device. That begins with device auto-detection, which enables Brightcove to determine what device a user is connecting to the page from, and sending the appropriate video. For desktops and most other mobile devices, that will mean displaying video in Flash, but when an iPad user connects, they will get a custom HTML5 video player.

Brightcove will transcode existing video assets into compatible H.264 videos for playback on the iPad for publishers that wish to enable HTML5 video. The new features will also enable publishers to create multi-title playlists which can be viewed whether a user is connecting from a PC, iPad or other mobile device.

While publishers will be able to display HTML5 video on the iPad, there are still a number of features that are standard for Flash that have yet to be fully fleshed out in HTML5, such as advertising, analytics, digital rights management, and the creation of custom video players and user interfaces. At first Brightcove will support just basic playback on the iPad, with a small amount of player customization. But over the next three to nine months, it will be working to add more features. By the end of three months, Brightcove expects to have more robust player customization as well as support for Apple’s multi-bitrate streaming and some basic advertising and analytics. By the end of 2010, it hopes to have a complete analytics and advertising features for HTML5 video.

Brightcove’s announcement follows similar news from multiple technology companies and publishers seeking to get ready for HTML5 video. Rival Ooyala, for instance, announced that it is also rolling out support for HTML5 video on the iPad. CBS appears to be testing out an HTML5 implementation on CBS.com specifically designed for iPad video. And earlier this year, YouTube and Vimeo both rolled out their own versions of HTML5 video players.

For Brightcove, supporting video on the iPad just expands the number of devices that it can reach. Earlier this year, the white-label video platform announced support for Flash 10.1 to deliver video on BlackBerry, Google Android, Palm, Symbian and Windows Mobile devices. It also previously announced the ability to reach multiple Internet-connected TV platforms, such as Boxee, Roku, Vudu, and Yahoo TV Widgets.

Related content on NewTeeVee: Sorry, HTML5 Crowd, Flash Ain’t Dead Yet

Related content on GigaOM Pro: Forecast: Tablet App Sales To Hit $8B by 2015 (subscription required)

  1. Yet again, Apple forces trend.

    Share
    1. To be fair, I think a lot of folks were looking at HTML5 before this. But yes, iPad’s lack of Flash could drive adoption much more quickly than we expected.

      Share
  2. Constable Odo Monday, March 29, 2010

    Thanks, Brightcove for helping move the mobile web towards HTML5. I’m not trying to kill Flash, but I certainly do want there to be an alternative to Flash. Hopefully, this technology does not suck up a lot of processor cycles or have the security issues that Flash does. Maybe this technology will be a lot better for mobile devices so the battery life won’t be shortened considerably. I’m surprised more mobile users aren’t concerned about battery life. They just seem to want all that fancy bandwidth-sucking Flash coding for some reason. I can understand developers not wanting to lose their livelihood, but I would think that mobile users would be happy for something that’s less taxing to their devices.

    Share
  3. Despite this of this, there’s still 99.9999 percent of the web still to go for HTML5. Good luck

    Share
  4. [...] sites to look pretty on the iPad. So the internet's already starting to look different." (More. Pushback.) (tags: ipad flash web-design app-development [...]

    Share
  5. [...] already enabled them to be viewed using HTML5. And while multiple technology providers, such as Brightcove, Ooyala, thePlatform and Delve Networks are working to make publishing on the device as simple as [...]

    Share
  6. [...] Adds iPad Support Over the past week, online video management platforms Brightcove, Ooyala and Delve Networks all announced that they support iPad, but now it looks like an encoding [...]

    Share
  7. [...] that has existing support for iPhone video delivery. So don’t be fooled by the rash of iPad support announcements that have popped up from technology providers over the past week or so. In most [...]

    Share
  8. [...] And just as there were a string of vendor announcements around the iPad launch, as companies like Brightcove, Encoding.com, mDialog and others touted the ability to stream H.264-encoded HTML5 video, early [...]

    Share
  9. [...] Brightcove’s SVP of Marketing announced the new solution on the company’s blog, saying that the majority of publishers surveyed by Brightcove plan to launch mobile advertising within the next 6-12 months. Brightcove originally announced support for video on the iPad at the end of March. [...]

    Share
  10. [...] Brightcove introduced an iPhone app SDK, and just a few months after it made available tools to deliver HTML5 video to the iPhone, iPad and other devices that don’t support Flash. Now with support for native [...]

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post