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Summary:

People are still buzzing about the HTC EVO, which debuted yesterday at the CTIA trade show. But if you take away the 4G, another phone appeared yesterday that rivals the EVO on paper. Samsung’s Galaxy S competes well with the EVO and supports GSM networks.

Galaxy-S-thumb

People are still buzzing about the HTC EVO, which debuted yesterday at the CTIA trade show. There’s good reason for the buzz — fast processor, large display, high-definition video recording and speedy 4G service. But if you take away the 4G, another phone appeared yesterday that rivals the EVO on paper. I’m talking about the Samsung Galaxy S, which ought to appeal to folks with a GSM provider.

In lieu of a Qualcomm Snapdragon, Samsung went in-house with their own 1 GHz CPU, but hasn’t released any further details on the chip. The 4″ display is SuperAMOLED that should provide vibrant color — handy for watching video on the 800 x 480 screen. Google’s Android 2.1 lies beneath, but Samsung’s new SmartLife user brings some customization and social networking updates to the home screen. The 5 megapixel camera takes stills of course, as well as 720p video at 30 fps. HSPA — the faster 7.2 kind — Bluetooth and 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi round out the connectivity options.

Between Samsung’s Galaxy, the HTC EVO, and Nexus One, it looks like a new standard for high-end smartphones is taking shape. A 1 GHz CPU paired with high-res display, fast mobile broadband, and HD or near-HD video capability is the status quo right now. The age of the superphone is here, although you’ll have to wait a bit — Samsung hasn’t yet announced pricing or a release date, saying the phone will be available soon. Funny — the EVO and Galaxy S share that trait too.

Related research on GigaOM Pro (sub req’d):

Marketing Handsets in the Superphone Era

  1. Man, Samsung just ripped off iPhone’s look. Welcome to 2007! where every phone tried to look like the iPhone.

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    1. Hmmm…

      If your making a touch screen phone, exactly how could they look different? Touch screen phones look alike because form is following function. (P.S. A lot of Apple’s design came out of research done in universities and when it comes right down to it, hardware wise, the approach isn’t much different from that of early PDA’s. It’s evolutionary, not revolutionary.)

      I’ve always thought that Samsung designs were always more refined than competing HTC devices. When it comes to video recording, Samsung has always had an edge.

      As for now, 4G isn’t really a consideration, due to limited available and the unknown of what the experience will really be like in heavy usage zones.

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      1. I agree that the Galaxy S looks a lot more similar to the iPhone than many other touch screen phones out there.

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      2. I believe in what you’ve said Ray. A lot of people seem to forget the dell, hp and others that had the same form factore and palm had the grid menu only not in color now the galaxy S also has a feature where if you don’t like it in grid you can change it to list. check out videos on youtube can’t exactly remember which one.

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  2. In recent news, AndroidandMe has pointed out that the Galaxy S’ graphics processing unit is 3 times more powerful than popular leading smartphones, at 90m triangles/sec.

    If I’m comparing specs correctly, it also means that the Galaxy S bests the PlayStation Portable on graphics too.

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