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Summary:

The folks behind the music video jukebox Sonicswap are at it again, this time launching what could soon be every Nexus One user’s best friend. Tunevision compiles music video playlists based on your Last.fm, iTunes or Sonicswap usage data — users can also start from scratch […]

The folks behind the music video jukebox Sonicswap are at it again, this time launching what could soon be every Nexus One user’s best friend. Tunevision compiles music video playlists based on your Last.fm, iTunes or Sonicswap usage data — users can also start from scratch by simply entering a few band names. Think Pandora, but for music videos. The functionality is very similar to the original Sonicswap site, with one big difference: There’s also a mobile version of Tunevision that runs on a Nexus One via Adobe Flash 10.1.

Of course, Adobe hasn’t officially released Flash 10.1 for Android yet, but Sonicswap worked closely with Adobe on the development of the app. Sonicswap CEO Dan Skilken recorded a quick video demo of the app running on a Nexus One for us (embedded below), and I gotta say: It looks pretty darn cool.

Tunevision serves music videos from YouTube and Sony’s online properties, and it offers its users the ability to fine-tune their playlist through sliders that impact factors like the popularity of the artists selected. Users can also start off their playlist with a number of Last.fm user names — a neat feature if you want to compile a list based on the taste of a group of friends.

The application is currently only available on the web, but a Adobe Air client is in the works. Tunevision will release an Android app based on Air in the next couple of months, and Android users will also be able to access a mobile version of the site as soon as Adobe releases Flash 10.1 for the mobile OS.

Skilken made a point of telling us that something like this wouldn’t have been possible on the iPhone. “There is no question in my mind that the performance of Flash on Nexus is so good, that Steve Job’s ranting is motivated by the fear of this unlocking the walled garden,” he wrote us in an email, adding that the development of the Android app only took a couple of days.

Sonicswap also won’t have to wait until Apple approves the app, though it will have to hold out until Adobe finally ships its Android Flash 10.1 player. Adobe demoed Flash 10.1 on a Nexus One in January, and the company told us at the time that it was on track to release the Flash 10.1 player for Android phones in the first half of 2010.

SonicSwap, which is based in Palo Alto, Calif., has four employees and has raised $2.5 million in angel funding.

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