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Summary:

CA, the company formerly known as Computer Associates, is buying Aliso Viejo, Calif.-based 3Tera for an undisclosed amount as part of its ongoing makeover to capture the opportunities presented by cloud computing. It is competing with IBM, HP and BMC for attention and market opportunities.

As predicted, CA, the company formerly known as Computer Associates, is buying another cloud computing company. Instead of snapping up Eucalyptus or Cloudkick, as our own Derrick Harris thought, CA is going old school and buying Aliso Viejo, Calif.-based 3Tera for an undisclosed amount.

3Tera is one of the oldest companies focused on infrastructure management and monitoring. It tweaked its business a tad in order to go after the opportunities presented by the growing popularity of cloud computing. Its core product is AppLogic, which allows companies to configure and deploy applications to either private or public clouds.

Explaining why CA bought 3Tera, CA’s Jay Fry wrote on his blog:

Enterprises have been a little more reticent to make sure they know what they are getting into before making the leap to cloud. This is probably one of the areas that CA can help improve by backing the 3Tera innovations with significant resources: enterprises need to feel comfortable to move applications to the cloud. A 3Tera/CA combination will give enterprises a significant partner that’s providing a technology to make the steps possible – and much more doable. The 3Tera deal is certainly a very public acknowledgement by CA that cloud computing is front and center to what’s changing in IT. And, the deal drops another piece into place in a rapidly filling-out strategy by CA to address those changes.

The company in the recent past has acquired Cassatt, NetQos and Oblicore, making 3Tera its fourth acquisition in the cloud computing business. CA CEO William McCracken plans to spend about $300 million buying cloud computing startups.

With giants like IBM, HP and BMC Software looking to bottle the cloud computing magic, expect more cloud-related acquisitions in 2010.

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  1. This makes total sense and I’m surprised that one of the big hosting companies such as RackSpace didn’t make the buy. The split between hardware management services and the software components that make up a complex application are clear in AppLogic. AppLogic minimizes operational overhead and increases productivity for application and system architects. Businesses deploy applications for an ROI. Reducing infrastructure build out for a project to a design exercise is a huge win. I recommended AppLogic to a major institutional bank I worked for years ago, it’s the premiere private cloud solution! Architects don’t care about operating systems, they care about networked services and QoS.

    Congrats to the guys at AppLogic! Let’s see if we can’t get AppLogic on Rackspace Cloud!

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