Summary:

Nielsen has released a new oh-no-another-survey-about-paid-content this morning, and while global answer after surveying 27,000 consumers ac…

Nielsen has released a new oh-no-another-survey-about-paid-content this morning, and while global answer after surveying 27,000 consumers across 52 countries is a big “maybe”, there are some interesting nuggets. Among them, a conclusion about why young people are more willing to pay for content than older age groups: that they may be beginning to view the content as platform-agnostic, and hence the value of online content for them is no less valuable than the content on TV. Which is a bit of a stretch, and probably more in-depth research is needed on this. But if true, is an optimistic view of the future of premium content.

Some findings:
– Consumers are most likely to pay for services they normally pay for offline, including theatrical movies, music, games and select videos such as current TV shows.
– They are least likely to pay for user-gen content/user-grown, including social communities, podcasts, consumer-generated videos and blogs.
– 3 out of 4 believe if they’re paying for the pub offline, they should get free access online.

– Only 43 percent say an easy payment method would make them more likely to buy content online.
– Free content has strongest support in Latin America, where 91 percent of those surveyed favor the status quo. Lowest in Asia Pacific, where 80 percent of respondents agree.
– The younger the consumers the more apt they are to have already paid, or be willing to pay, for various types of content. This may seem counterintuitive, but the survey says “it reflects a realization that they are now in a world where the value of content is platform-agnostic; and video consumed online may be no less valuable than watched on television.” An interesting and optimistic way to look at it…
– Only about one-third (34%) of those surveyed entertains the notion of paying for newspaper content. Support is strongest in Latin America (40%), Asia Pacific (36%) and MEAP (35%)

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