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Summary:

Are you making an iPad app? If the answer is yes, you’re definitely not alone. A recent report by Flurry Analytics, a firm which conducts research on mobile tech and trends, found that the number of new projects being developed for the iPhone (and now for […]

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Are you making an iPad app? If the answer is yes, you’re definitely not alone. A recent report by Flurry Analytics, a firm which conducts research on mobile tech and trends, found that the number of new projects being developed for the iPhone (and now for the iPad, too) nearly tripled after Apple’s announcement of the new device.

The information is based on the number of developers who are integrating Flurry analytics into their iPhone OS-based apps, a number which increased threefold to nearly 1,800 applications in January, versus less than 600 in December. It’s a difference that’s too great to be accounted for by chance alone, and it’s the largest surge ever measured in the history of Flurry’s stat tracking.

The surge also helped Apple reinforce the dominance of its App Store versus its most significant competitor, the Google Android market. In December, new Android projects rose sharply, while new iPhone projects experienced the largest dip yet seen since the introduction of Google’s Android developer API. The January numbers more than reversed that trend, however.

So while there’s no denying that the gold rush is on for iPad development, there does remain the question of whether or not said gold rush will actually pay off for developers. Apple must be pleased as punch, because it sells its devices on the back of content, a big chunk of which for the iPad and iPhone platform comes from the App Store. But developers hoping to cash in and repeat some of the early successes of the App Store following its initial launch may be sorely disappointed when March comes around.

Yes, Apple will be expanding the customer base of the App Store by a significant margin, even if sales don’t meet the ambitious expectations the company seems to have for the device. But how much of that will translate into people willing to pay for new apps for their new devices? We already know that free app downloads exceed paid ones by a pretty wide margin. And there’s a very good chance that many of the iPad’s early adopters will be owners of iPhones and iPod touches. It’s entirely possible that this group will stick with the purchases they’ve already made, and be wary of making new ones without a solid demonstration of added value from iPad-specific apps.

The landscape is also very different this time around. There are many more established players on the scene now, including ones that ensconced themselves in consumers’ hearts after coming out of nowhere when the App Store initially launched. ngmoco is a good example of one of these. The existence of these iPhone stars will likely make iPad app downloading less of a merit-based system than it was in the frontier days of the App Store’s origin.

Is it a good idea to work on your iPad development skills (sub required)? Probably. Larger companies and brands will no doubt be looking to farm out app development down the road. Should you expect to hear about or experience the same kind of overnight success stories that accompanied the App Store’s launch? I’d say not. Lightning doesn’t often strike twice, and this is one instance where that old maxim’s likely to be proven true.

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  1. 1,000,000 app’s will still not entice me to purchase an I-Pad. This is the first new Apple device in a very long time that did not excite me enough to even consider purchasing. I own a wide variety of Apple gear, so dismissing my comments as an anti-Apple consumer would be a mistake. No, I do not need to go hands on to know that the I-Pad does not full a void or offer some functionality that will perform better than everything I already own.

    Hey, good luck to those plugging away at new app’s but do not think that they will sell the I-Pad hardware.

    1. I agree. I’m a mac addict and excited about all their new products. But I just can’t figure out why I would need one. I can only think that it may be targeted for people who dont have or need a fully functioning laptop.

    2. Exactly… It wasn’t build for you. Or me. Or any of us that scour tech sites. It was built for my family, who have already started saving their money to get one for each. Because they don’t want to be bothered to multi-task. They want to sit back in a couch and check their facebook status, or read a book, or play a game. Not design a website, or video conference. It’s a consumer appliance… that’s all. I won’t be getting one. But come March, my household will account for at least 2. With both inlaws pretty much demanding that we get a couple for them too. I hope developers are keeping that in mind. I hope MedicAlert is developing an App.

    3. Funny.

      I believe that the iPad will be a total game changer. Time will tell who is right of course, but this is the first real platform in the next evolution of the truly personal computer.

      -t

  2. Fake Steve Wosniak Friday, February 12, 2010

    “I do not need to go hands on to know that the I-Pad does not full a void or offer some functionality that will perform better than everything I already own.”
    I’ ve read a lot of sentiments like these since the iPad was announced. I’ve also read that the combination of form factor and ui on this device offers the potential to transform the online multimedia viewing experience in ways that may surprise the hell of of people who now can’t fathom what the big deal is with this thing. Of course, the doubters may be right, but how do you know what you don’t know, when the developers haven’t had a chance yet to show you what can be done with this gadget? The history of invention is littered with self-assured proclamations at the time of their introduction that the automobile, the PC, the iPod did “not full a void or offer some functionality that will perform better than everything I already own”. We have a way of mistaking familiarity for superiority. That’s what separates the visionary from everyone else.

  3. I can see where this may go and the potential behind it. If they get enough people on the IPad they could easily begin making it wireless and part of cell phone plans and have the ability to completely replace labtops. However, as it is, it won’t appeal to much to anyone who doesn’t read and travel regularly.

    1. I hope you are kidding.

      All iPads have built in WIFI and optionally. some will in addition carry data over cell lines, at very reasonable rates; which opens up voip everywhere their is wifi or a cell connection.

  4. I seldom travel. I have an iPhone and a MacBook Pro. Most of the tasks I need to do can be accomplished on the iPhone. The rest I use my notebook for. It’s not about the what the iPad can do, it’s how and where it can do what I want it to do. Now that the iPad is out, I may even go out and snap up an Apple TV.

    The iPad doesn’t replace anything it just takes a form that is the most useful for what I want to do.

  5. What I’m, um, curious about in this article has nothing WHATEVER to do with whether I want an iPad or not, or IF Apple is re-dominating the market for mobile apps…. It’s this Flurry Analytics. Do I have this right, that Flurry is saying “Hey! We’ve seen this massive spike in “people developing iPhone/Pad apps in January!”. (“The information is based on the number of developers who are integrating Flurry analytics into their iPhone OS-based apps.”). Could there be, I dunno, some OTHER reason people are INTEGRATING Flurry Analytics into their App products? Like a marketing push? Or, um, recent mentions of Flurry Analytics in articles? I’m being cheeky, but it DOES NOT FOLLOW that just because an analytics firm sees a spike in the use of their product by developers in new Apps, that it means X times MORE people are developing Apps. It *could*, but it’s totally faulty logic, and this speculative article is based on this assumption. Just sayin’. I have nothing better to do on an early Saturday morning. Yes… Bet Flurry is happy!

  6. I don’t usually post on blogs but I found yours interesting. Keep up the good work. I’ve enjoyed reading here.

  7. I doubt if the Ipad is going to succeed as much as iphone. Will wait and see what happens in two months.

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  10. IPad they could easily begin making it wireless and part of cell phone plans and have the ability to completely replace labtops. However, as it is, it won’t appeal to much to anyone who doesn’t read and travel regularly.

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