89 Comments

Summary:

MySpace, like all nightclubs past their prime, has hit its expiration date. The recent exit of CEO Owen Van Natta is a sign of a bigger problem: News Corp’s disinterest in digital media. Rupert Murdoch has moved on to the latest shiny shiny: tablets & eReaders.

It’s not a good idea to speak ill of the dead. It is OK, however, to speak the truth, however harsh it might seem, about the living dead.

Rupert Murdoch’s $580 million MySpace purchase has outlived not only its utility, but has also finally hit its expiration date. That last step came with the announcement this afternoon that Owen Van Natta was stepping down as chief executive of the company.  This was nine months after he joined the Los Angeles-based venture. It’s circling the drains, if you ask me.

Is anyone surprised that Van Natta left? I’m not. Rupert Murdoch had put him in charge. Then Jon Miller, the head of News Corp.’s digital operations, brought in two more guys -– Mike Jones and Jason Hirschhorn. I think you can read between the lines here. You have three guys with a strong emphasis on operations –- sort of like three short-stops on the same baseball team.

When the trio came together, I asked the question, Can Internet’s Free Agents Save MySpace? My take was simple:

News Corp is counting on the equivalent of three Internet free agents to replace Chris DeWolfe and Tom Anderson and revive MySpace, the big but not so bountiful social network. The three free agents are CEO Owen Van Natta (former COO of Facebook), COO Mike Jones (founder and CEO of Userplane) and Chief Product Officer Jason Hirschhorn (former president of SlingMedia.) These three men are certainly capable, but they are on a mission impossible. I think MySpace Music is a nice niche opportunity — how big of one remains to be seen. For the three free agents — good luck guys! You are really going to need it.

From what I gather, there were conflicts between Van Natta and his boss, Miller. It was clear that someone had to go and it wasn’t going to be Miller, mostly because Murdoch wasn’t around to save Van Natta. This kind of corporate infighting is a sign of a bigger malaise. In many ways, News Corp and Murdoch have lost any and all interest in the web. The fire sales of Photobucket and Rotten Tomatoes are clear indicators that any and every digital property is up for sale. I bet if you showed up with a decent offer for, say, IGN or MySpace, News Corp would be willing to make a deal.

I don’t blame them. With “Avatar” bringing in more revenues than all their digital properties put together, COO Chase Carey, I am told, doesn’t care much for these headache businesses. News Corp’s other businesses, such as its cable networks, are making a decent amount of money as well. The web doesn’t hold much attraction for Rupert Murdoch, who is now enamored with e-readers and tablets.

Tablets, according to those in the know, are being viewed as saviors for News Corp.’s core business: news and information. He thinks that since devices are not that useful without his content, he eventually wins because he will get people to win pay for his content. “Content is not just king, it is the emperor of all things electronic!” he recently said. But as our Kevin Kelleher essentially summed up in discussing Murdoch and News Corp’s business strategy in this post over the weekend, “Murdoch is right that those devices are lifeless without content, but he neglects to mention that it’s a symbiotic relationship.”

Kevin also noted that Murdoch, and every large media company, need to think like startups. Unfortunately that is no longer in the DNA that defines Murdoch. If he thought like a startup, instead of hiring three managers, the company would have hired a strong chief technology officer, who had the vision and the guts to essentially take the living corpse of a social network and send a shock through its system. They needed someone who could think of and build a Spotify based on MySpace Music!

What the company needed was radical transformation. But what it got was infighting, politicking and constant contraction.  At the time Van Natta, Jones and Hirschhorn joined the company it had two things going for it -– the audience and the social graph. There was a time when celebrities used MySpace to stay in touch with their fans. Now they’re all using Twitter.

The audience has started to fritter away, moving to better, more current social environments such as Facebook and Twitter. As for the social graph, I wonder if MySpace really had one. I wouldn’t be surprised if more executives, including those from recently acquired startups such as imeem and iLike, left for greener and more viable pastures.

As my friend Pip Coburn has told me many times, turnarounds never really turn. They usually run aground. Time for Myspace N.O!

* Photo of Rupert Murdoch courtesy of World Economic Forum via Flickr.

* Photo of Owen Van Natta by JD Lassica via Flickr


  1. There’s a vast, vast, (scary vast) network of niche groups on MySpace that I spent some time clicking-through a few weekends ago, many of these seem to be similar to the (often sex-related) yahoo groups of 5-10 years ago. These groups are relatively active, and some of the users are on MySpace ALL THE FREAKIN TIME. For most of us here, MySpace may be dead, however, there’s still alot of people who use it, actively, apparently.

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  2. The Obituary was written quite a while ago.

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  3. MySpace has long been dead. Check out the book “wired for thought” which walked through and predicted MySpace’s demise even before Facebook was hot. Myspace’s problem was that it got too large.

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    1. (Sorry I hit submit too soon). MySpace’s problem (counterintuitively) is that it got too large, not that it is now shrinking. At the size and structure that Myspace once was, it was impossible to use or get value from.

      This is a classic network effect. When something gets too big, it always blows up.

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    2. Then when will Facebook blow?

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      1. Good question…
        I’d suggest either (a) when FB changes its layout so radically that people desert it, rather than moan about it on numerous “Bring back the old FB” groups, or (b) people get bored of playing FarmVille / Mafia Wars…

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      2. Facebook is already slightly staggering and pretty much ready to drop any day now. It too like MySpace got too big and it’s day is coming. FB is planning to go public within the next year which may be good news for the investor, but for the user all it means is that it is on the same path to becoming as bloated and as useless as MySpace was. Sarah speaks the truth ‘When something gets too big, it always blows up.’ I will also add that News Corp. dropped the ball back in 2007-08 when they failed to upgrade and make the improvements to MySpace so they could compete with FB. One final thing I would like to say to Twitter is….try to take a cue from the failures that came before you. Just because you CAN become big and bloated….doesn’t mean you SHOULD.

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      3. Twitter founders think like the Ramones. Simple stripped down three chords rock and roll, forever.

        They won’t sell out. I still believe.

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      4. I dont’t think Facebook will blow. I think it will become more like a sister (don’t ask why facebook is feminine …i don’t know) from Google.

        Facebook has tools insite that blow my mind. FB could be a twitter Killer, RSS Reader Killer and MSN Killer.

        And FB hasn’t yet tapes out the full potential. What if they integrate VoIP or Business Groups with projekt management tools, document upload and online confernce tools.

        FB also has a goog advertising system. Because of that they earn a lot money which they can pu into research. Twitter doesn’t have this kind of cashflow.

        …you see realy like facebook.

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      5. Just wait a few months – one suprising new player is going to appear on social-web market. It will be really sth new!

        See you!

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  4. Myspace always had the “scent” of GeoCities, and it managed to go through its life-cycle in a fraction of the time.

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  5. I agree with Sarah and Anthony. The writing was a on the wall a long time ago. I think everyone could agree that the technology in facebook was far superior to that of myspace even from the begining. Like Sarah said, they got way too big and the barrage of ads which slowed the site down just became too much to deal with, which by and large led to the mass exodus. They had a good run, but they put the ads before the user experience.

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  6. Dear Rupert Murdoch,

    There is nothing wrong with the machine, it has actually gotten better from what Tom built. The user’s still love it yet most are clueless to what’s going on. Just get it over with, turn Myspace into a real-time internet version of American Idol, for every single one of it’s believe they can be artists. Offer a cash prize for real-time tournaments. Go global with it, let’s see who is the first Internet Diva. Cough it up for a few years, I’ll even throw in the marketing with http://firstinternetdiva.com. When it’s feasible to have the “Myspace channel”, we’ll do live tournaments right from our living room. And while your earning eyeballs from all that bandwidth, monetize it by becoming the next-gen record company.

    Once it’s done, fire the guy who helped build it, he’ll have other internet to build anyway.

    Jason Nadaf

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  7. I think MySpace squandered a perfect opportunity to regain some of its “mojo”. As we all know in this business, its all about the sizzle factor. If you have no real compelling story to tell, then you die a slow death. MySpace had the perfect opportunity to be a leader in the digital music space, with large userbase and all the bands and artists on their network, but they chose to use “record label” like tactics in trying to “corporatize” their music strategy. Social networks are like starving bands, as long as you stay hungry, you keep your creative focus and write killer songs. Once you make it big, its over. I agree that a CTO/tech person would have been a better choice to lead the charge. Van Netta is a solid citizen who should have been given greater freedom to pick his lieutenants. Now what?

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  8. Well, Om, I won’t dispute you on how poorly this reflects on News Corp’s management of its digital assets. But, if you check the most recent comscore, MySpace has grown 2 months in a row, and is back up to 120MM users worldwide. That may not sound huge compared with Facebook’s 350MM, but it is still 2X twitter’s audience, and blows almost any other site out of the water. We in Silicon Valley tend to think that when something is not hockey-sticking anymore than it is dead. That is not true. If MySpace lost 1MM users a month it would take 10 years to disappear. That still gives them some time to figure out what to do. Do they have the right people in house to do it? That is another question…

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  9. [...] full post on Hacker News If you enjoyed this article, please consider sharing it! Tagged with: MySpace [...]

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  10. I have a gut feeling that MySpace is poised for a comeback. For one thing, my connections on Facebook -> i know them in real life. Facebook has always been a reflection of a person’s real social ‘graph’ (are they still using that term). On MySpace, it was far more intuitive to find new people with shared interests for whatever purpose, and easier to separate this profile(s) from your real life. There’s something very scary about how deeply embedded Facebook has found itself in the real lives of individuals, where there is still that vibe (albeit false) sense of anonymity at MySpace.

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  11. Jeffrey Henderson Thursday, February 11, 2010

    Jones brought some really smart people with him when he joined Myspace and if they can just keep everyone else out of their way I think myspace will have a bright future.

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  12. I agree with the general theme of these comments that MySpace got too big. Even to the untrained eye, its design and architecture feels unmanaged (and perhaps unmanageable). If Facebook is Cloud City the MySpace is Bladerunner’s Los Angeles; colourful, exciting but just too full on.

    My partner work in the music business as an assistant to a booking agent. She looks after big name bands as well as unheard ofs, and to a man, all of the bands and singers starting out have a MySpace page and use it as a preferance to Facebook. This is clearly where the site’s future has to lie. Strip out all of the crap and use it as a platform for music. There’s nothing really out there like it. Last.FM does not have the social element (nor the cache) as good a service as it is, while Facebook is just too clinical and smart to convey the excitement and energy of discovering music.

    As has been pointed out on there though, Murdoch’s attentions have been turned back to his core business of media distribution. He’s on a mission to kill the freemium business model and make paid for content work on the web. In this MySpace is liable to go the way of Friends Reunited unless tough decisions are made.

    With operations guys at the helm though, you’d thing this clarity of thought would be able to be seen through to execution, I guess it depends if the appetite (and cash) is there for them to do so.

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  13. [...] MySpace, R.I.P: My latest piece on why I think MySpace's days are numbered. from @gigaomClose [...]

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  14. What happened to MySpace will happen to Facebook/Twitter or any other of those million social networking sites out there.

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  15. “Kevin also mentioned that Murdoch, and every large media company, need to think like startups.”

    Good advice – but only to a point. The fact is that News Inc (like all major media companies) can currently make more money online creating products which leverage other assets they own than standalone digital-only properties.

    One simple example: a site tying into Avatar will have an instant audience and massive opportunity for cross-promotion and cross-sell, as long as it doesn’t suck. It won’t take years to build audience, won’t have large ongoing costs, and won’t need to have much in the way of work done on visual identity. It’s an instant money-spinner.

    So if News Inc was developing digital-only properties from scratch, as I’m sure it will do in the future, “think like a startup” is good advice. But most of the time, it needs to “think like a corporate” – creating digital properties based on other media, linking them all together, and using the power of old media to create instant brand identity in the digital space.

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  16. [...] an interesting piece on the problems at MySpace under Murdoch, Om Malik mentions this: Kevin also mentioned that Murdoch, and every large media company, need to [...]

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  17. To paraphrase Mark Twain, “Rumors of MySpace’s Death may be premature”. My sense is MySpace has found its niche as a music focused social network in a landscape chock-a-block with competition. The Compete.com numbers suggest traffic has been stabilizing. It may not be running the way Murdoch would like but it still appears to be a viable entity.

    Mark

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  18. [...] 0 Add your comment There was so much to write about today: Google Buzz, the MySpace management reshuffle and the BBC forcing journalists to use social media. However the story that had the most [...]

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  19. [...] MySpace in its death throes.  (GigaOM) [...]

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  20. [...] MySpace, R.I.P – GigaOM Kevin: Om Malik looks at the CXO mud wrestling match at MySpace. That's old news, and the FT took a deep dive into larger issues at MySpace last month. The really interesting lines in this story deal with whether News Corp is tired of the web and is going to refocus on its high margin businesses. “In many ways, News Corp and Murdoch have lost any and all interest in the web. The fire sales of Photobucket and Rotten Tomatoes are clear indicators that any-and-every digital property is up for sale. I bet if you showed up with a decent offer for say IGN or MySpace, News Corp would be willing to make a deal.” (tags: myspace murdoch newscorp socialnetworking business) [...]

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  21. Not even I would bother working at MySpace; I’d be wasting my time.

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    1. dude, you I wouldn’t hire you to take out my trash let alone work in an office

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  22. It’s kind of scary how fast a web property can fade away from public memory due to essentially an image issue.

    Still, imho – it’s too early to write it off completely. It still pull in boatloads of more revenue than sites like Twitter!

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  23. [...] en Abril para revivir el servicio y la compañía. Poco tiempo ha tenido para intentar algo, pero desde GigaOM escriben sobre los posibles conflictos internos entre Van Natta y los otros dos [...]

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  24. [...] at GigaOM they have posted about how they feel the clock has struck midnight for much maligned Myspace.  The [...]

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  25. [...] MySpace, once the King of the Internet, lost its second CEO yesterday in less than a year. The response from press has, rightfully, been bleak. [...]

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  26. [...] MySpace, once the King of the Internet, lost its second CEO yesterday in less than a year. The response from press has, rightfully, been bleak. [...]

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  27. [...] MySpace, R.I.P [...]

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  28. [...] the end of MySpace, and there is a good possibility the end of News Corp. itself.Comments welcome.Source. google_ad_client = "pub-1010351291450991"; google_ad_width = 300; google_ad_height = 250; [...]

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  29. While, I agree with some of you on the point of turning Myspace into a full-on Indie rock orgy, I can’t but help notice the fact that since the novelty is gone even if this course of action was taken people would still be obliged to visit based on the name alone (to newscorp, the revamping and maintenance wouldn’t even be worth the cost). The small spike in traffic mentioned is also indicative of what investors on Wall Street like to call the “dead cat bounce”. Mainly just that last gasp of air before you drown to death.

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  30. i’m just terribly upset that the half-dead myspace had to reach its hand out of the grave and take imeem along with it. i think if myspace had leveraged imeem’s platform and transformed itself (like others have already said here) into a niche music site for music lovers and artists alike, it coulda been a contender.

    the ability to incorporate music was the one thing that differentiated myspace from other social networks – seems like a hugely obvious missed opportunty.

    without that, myspace is really just a seedy meat market.

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  31. Hey since it is a Murdock company just make it “Anti-Obama”-Space and get all the Dittoheads to join it. “White-Only” of course.

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  32. [...] Om Malik, writing at Gigaom, has declared MySpace to be [...]

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  33. [...] 一時はインターネットの王者だったMySpaceが1年足らずの間に2人のCEOを失った。メディアのMySpaceを見る目は当然ながら厳しい。 [...]

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  34. The amazing thing about the MySpace is it represents an awesome opportunity to blaze a new music promotion paradigm! If Dino Murdoch had any sense he would bring in some social net guru to retool the site to expand the new music paradigm it has already become!

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  35. [...] MySpace, RIP.  (GigaOM) [...]

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  36. [...] 一時はインターネットの王者だったMySpaceが1年足らずの間に2人のCEOを失った。メディアのMySpaceを見る目は当然ながら厳しい。 [...]

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  37. AVATAR by News Corps Q2 reports accounted for $200 million in film division operating income. That’s not a lot. Murdoch said they’d book AVATAR revenue from foreign places like China, Brazil, Russia, and Mexico in later quarters, and expects robust DVD sales even though it will be a 2-D release.

    I would not expect much actual revenue to accrue to News Corp — AVATAR was by all accounts co-financed, with the financial group taking first cut of revenues, which themselves are questionable out of places like China, Russia, and Brazil.

    BY CONTRAST, Fox News and other cable operations combined for about $600 million in operating income. Fox News alone is believed to generate a billion per year in operating income.

    If you looked at which operations put forth the most cash income from operations, it would be Fox News, “a niche of half the country.”

    [Anti-Obama stuff now comprises about 55% of the nation, according to polls. Its never a good idea to be Conan O'Brien, particularly as the death of niche stuff due to lack of high income yuppies is at hand.]

    AVATAR is not making Murdoch money, which is why he does not have a deal in place NOW for a sequel (i.e. throw money and deals at Cameron to get one). AVATAR cost roughly the amount of MySpace’s purchase price.

    What Murdoch COULD DO is make MySpace an Itunes alternative to see / hear “free-ad supported” Fox TV shows, and music. With downloads available at modest prices, above Itunes but with no DRM and with “extras” that make it worthwhile. The social network part would be the Amazon/Last.fm/Pandora model of “you’d like this if you like that,” plus “bonus extras” found nowhere else. Interviews with musicians, actors, etc. Chats with various creative people (producers, performers, etc.)

    These are things News Corp knows how to do (appeal to the vast middle not the small elite yuppies). Fox News has higher ratings than NBC, CBS, ABC nightly news, plus CNN, CNN Headline News, and MSNBC COMBINED! Myspace will never be an elite, yuppie hangout but there is a LOT of money in the vast middle.

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  38. [...] MySpace, once the King of the Internet, lost its second CEO yesterday in less than a year. The response from press has, rightfully, been bleak. [...]

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  39. [...] yet another irrefutable sign of the great and inevitable unwinding of a once-mighty web property. Malik’s piece is both persuasive and blunt. There is little argument that MySpace has been adrift for some time [...]

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  40. [...] heart has stopped. It could potentially be shocked back into life but according to TechCrunch and others, certainly not through the way in which News Corp has been doing it. Here are some audience [...]

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  41. [...] MySpace, R.I.P It’s not a good idea to speak ill of the dead. It is OK, however, to speak the truth, however harsh it might [...] [...]

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  42. It’s difficult to see how MySpace might ever return to being a serious contender to Facebook; certainly as a ‘social networking tool’; and it’s lack of any apparent real desire to do so must go down as one of the colossal marketing failures in that business’s history.

    That said, the one area MySpace still beats the pants off Facebook is as a show-space/repository/gallery, for artists and musicians to show their wares and output so that others may watch/play/view them. Facebook still doesn’t have that ‘adult’ mindset and just assumes all its audience/membership are 13 year old school girls – with the proclivities to match.

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  43. well I did use myspace and I have zero friends there.because none of my friend use myspace.so the point is myspace need to bring more traffic. traffic is the king and not just content

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  44. It doesn’t matter how many niche groups and users use MySpace. Ultimately it comes down to money and how much it costs rupert to run it compared to revenue return.

    The recent closures of MySpace offices overseas is a clear indication that Rupert is eager to cut running costs as much as possible, and can also been seen as a clear indicator that MySpace is no longer the cash rich company it once was.

    The slow development progress at MySpace has caused it to lag behind many other emerging social networks. The popularity and rapidly growing user base at Facebook has seen many of the bands and djs that made MySpace, jump ship and head to where there fans are.

    I think it is almost time to call last orders on MySpace, the question is how long will Rupert hold on to it for, and can he ever find a buyer.

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  45. I couldn’t stand MySpace from day one. Spammy, the code of many customized sites was so horrible that regularly crashed my browser, disorganized. It was like GeoCities-meets-AOL-meets-RealAudio-meets-Pornsite. Once I got into Facebook in 2007 I never looked back.

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  46. [...] Read the rest of this post on the original site Tagged: Internet, Voices, digital, economy, social networking, GigaOm, MySpace, Om Malik, Rupert Murdoch | permalink Sphere.Inline.search("", "http://voices.allthingsd.com/20100212/myspace-r-i-p/"); « Previous Post ord=Math.random()*10000000000000000; document.write(''); [...]

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  47. [...] venimos diciendo desde hace unos meses, pero últimamente parece ir a peor: Myspace R.I.P. es un pequeño resumen sobre todos los movimientos que están sucediendo en esta red social venida [...]

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  48. I know. Maybe Oracle could buy MySpace!

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  49. The real problem with mySpace is that it is owned by Rupert Murdoch. We users do not want him in on the web because we feel that he is the enemy of FREE internet. If we commit into the mySpace then we feel that one day we will be paying for it. Sorry but this is a public relations nightmere that Rupert Murdoch need to fix. Please Mr. Murdoch get out of the internet business.

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  50. Myspace worked to build an AD channel rather than a CONVERSATION place. Their failure is one more case study in the forever changed customer environment. It’s not just traditional means that have changed (print v. digital, etc) it’s the METHOD that has fundamentally shifted.

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  51. [...] a comment » Gigaom reports on yet another leadership upheaval at MySpace. This time, CEO Owen Van Natta is gone after less [...]

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  52. Wow, I think I agree with jasonspalace. But I know that a good idea is too good to be true, so what’s the downside. I think myspace can have a revival if the right person takes over. Imagine Google claiming it for cheap, that would be crazy and be the talk of the town.

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  53. [...] Malik over on GigaOm seems to confuse office politics at MySpace with the demise of the social network. Rupert Murdoch's $580 million MySpace purchase [...]

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  54. [...] generated a windfall from the Google deal, and now that its fortunes have soured, he is divesting from the medium: first Photobucket, then Rotten [...]

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  55. [...] generated a windfall from the Google deal, and now that its fortunes have soured, he is divesting from the medium: first Photobucket, then Rotten [...]

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  56. [...] 私の会社を買った会社を買ったこともあるMurdoch氏は、Googleとの取引からの棚ぼたのような、安易な形でMySpaceを買ったが、今その将来は危うい。彼はメディアスタートアップから手を引きつつある: 最初はPhotobucket、次がRotten Tomatoesだ。 [...]

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  57. [...] 私の会社を買った会社を買ったこともあるMurdoch氏は、Googleとの取引からの棚ぼたのような、安易な形でMySpaceを買ったが、今その将来は危うい。彼はメディアスタートアップから手を引きつつある: 最初はPhotobucket、次がRotten Tomatoesだ。 [...]

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  58. [...] profile. Om Malik, notable smart guy and founder of the reputable technology-web 2.0 news site Gigaom is reporting, “Rupert Murdoch’s $580 million MySpace purchase has outlived not only its utility, but has [...]

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  59. [...] generated a windfall from the Google deal, and now that its fortunes have soured, he is divesting from the medium: first Photobucket, then Rotten [...]

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  60. “But what it got was infighting, politicking and constant contraction.”

    Yup, sounds like a News Corp company!

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  61. [...] generated a windfall from the Google deal, and now that its fortunes have soured, he is divesting from the medium: first Photobucket, then Rotten [...]

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  62. [...] MySpace, once the King of the Internet, lost its second CEO yesterday in less than a year. The response from press has, rightfully, been bleak. [...]

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  63. [...] GO GO GADGET SEGMENT (Tech Talk)PleaseRobMe.com lets you know the easy burglary targetsIs MySpace about to become social history? [...]

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  64. [...] A whopping three quarters of the huge and growing volumes of traffic on the web aimed at social networks are headed for Facebook, according to ZScaler’s numbers. MySpace still commands 15 percent of traffic to top social networking sites, but we’ve written about the dark clouds hovering over it. [...]

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  65. [...] His profile on the official Idol site, though, has no such flavor or personality — Garcia is reduced to some bland Q&A and show excerpts. Which doesn’t just do Garcia a disservice, but represents a missed opportunity for Idol to build out its online presence, and perhaps even demonstrate that it’s not afraid of other web sites — including MySpace, which is owned by the same megacorp as Fox Television and is currently struggling to prove its relevance. [...]

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  66. [...] His profile on the official Idol site, though, has no such flavor or personality — Garcia is reduced to some bland Q&A and show excerpts. Which doesn’t just do Garcia a disservice, but represents a missed opportunity for Idol to build out its online presence, and perhaps even demonstrate that it’s not afraid of other web sites — including MySpace, which is owned by the same megacorp as Fox Television and is currently struggling to prove its relevance. [...]

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  67. Myspace became very cluttered very quickly, and people created browser crashing sites by using layout managers from 3rd parties that no one was ready for (and the implanted bugs and viruses from the more malicious ones). Bands and commercial properities would flood my bulletin boards and posts and the all-or-nothing privacy settings were killing the usefulness of even friending someone.

    Facebook seems to be a very good way to control and collect information on friends and colleagues, while twitter is a great way to keep up with commerce and entertainment and news. I found personally that this divide was a reason to abandon myspace. Obviously some people FB everything, and some people love twitter. I enjoy the separation, but I think that’s a great think to keep in mind about the scaling of social media. It does break down at large scales, so separating it is the best thing going for FB and twitter.

    Too bad myspace didn’t get on the ball earlier. There are a lot of unsigned bands who created an excellent page on myspace with music, downloads and shows that I’ve yet to see replicated as well on facebook or twitter.

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  68. [...] and replaced him with Co-presidents Mike Jones and Jason Hirschhorn, I decided it was time to write the social networking site’s epitaph. The recent exodus of executives and technical talent has only bolstered my belief that MySpace is [...]

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  69. [...] company’s second purge of the executive suite in February seems to have enhanced the negative spin, although SiliconValleyWatcher Tom Foremski disputes this, [...]

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  70. [...] Meanwhile, MySpace seems to have more or less fallen off the map, and has beens struggling with a number of management and other issues. But is there really a racial element behind Facebook’s success? Boyd says there is, but her [...]

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  71. Me gusta mucho myspace, no creo que sea una buena idea que este site copie estilo de facebook o de alguna otra pagina social, lo que si pueden hacer es abrir un nuevo cuato donde halla un juego “my space friends hacen un request donde esperan por aceptacion del amigo solicitado, So, se puede cambiar el request, “el juego consiste en que hay una puerta, un amigo toca, se pone musica la musica que la persona escoja, para recibir amigos, no se puede recibir amigos si no tienen fotos, y la persona tiene que hablar y presentarse, proveer infomacion basica que le permita entrar a tu pagina, y despues es permitido entrar, cada vez que decees hablar con un amigo toca a su propia puerta en su site, depende de el si quiere ensenar su imagen o hablar, se puede enviar regalos fotos intercambiar musica, numeros de cell,, y todo lo que permita el juego, por supuesto hay reglas, y decrechos y proteccion en ambos angulos…es solo una idea….Sonia,speak spanish as well…myspaceladyblak(Sonya Ramos

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  72. [...] destination” (Om wrote the social network’s obituary in February, after the departure of former CEO Owen Van Natta). Jones, meanwhile, said during the press call that he is excited about Myspace’s refocusing [...]

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  73. myspace is dead from what i see. they deleted everyone account and password savers when they made the new layout so now people have a hard time logging in and the pages wont load becouse they got so much junk trying to load and the new layout is just stupid stupid. i hope they die. someone get a bullet and yeller down

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  74. [...] But somewhere along the way, Facebook happened. Myspace became an executive quagmire, and the whole thing is falling apart. The pendulum has swung between two [...]

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  75. [...] close to $600 million in 2005: it has changed chief executives repeatedly, to the point where it has almost become comical, and it has refocused several times, with the latest incarnation targeting the entertainment [...]

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  76. Facebook has changed the whole game. They will be around for a very long time.

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  77. [...] known for making ambitious bets on new technology — even if they don’t always work out, as he found with MySpace — and also because Apple was a key partner, and used the News app to launch its new [...]

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  78. Myspace might suck, but Facebook is an abomination. ’nuff said.

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  79. [...] generated a windfall from the Google deal, and now that its fortunes have soured, he is divesting from the medium: first Photobucket, then Rotten [...]

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