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Summary:

Steve Ballmer first showed us the HP Slate during his keynote at the CES earlier this month. The tablet is running Windows 7 and is a thin slate form with a touchscreen. HP wants to prove the Slate is a real product, available “this year”, and […]

HP Slate NYT

Steve Ballmer first showed us the HP Slate during his keynote at the CES earlier this month. The tablet is running Windows 7 and is a thin slate form with a touchscreen. HP wants to prove the Slate is a real product, available “this year”, and that it will be reasonably priced. There is an awful lot of talking in the video from HP (far too much) but if you watch the whole thing you’ll get some decent close-up views of the HP Slate.

(thanks to Gear Diary)

  1. I really don’t want to be cynical about the HP Slate, but two thoughts come to mind. One — it’s simply an evolutionary step beyond the UMPCs we saw in 2006. It’s thinner, lighter, cheaper and probably has more battery life, all things being equal, but it’s not revolutionary in any way. And that brings me to point two: the “revolution” appears to be how it’s media-focused. Changing the use-case focus of a device doesn’t make it interesting to me personally, and I’m a long-time UMPC user.

    Aside from the product evolution, I’m not sure why we need a full-blown desktop OS like Windows 7 on a media-focused, touch device. It’s just too much overhead added for minimal benefit to most people. There will always be those that want to run all of their x86 desktop apps on a device like this — I’ve been one of those people myself — but most people won’t want to and that’s going to degrade the intended purpose for them. I’m just scratching my head over this one because it’s nothing more than anticipated hardware and software catching up to what Microsoft wanted to offer four years ago. Curious if other folks are jazzed by this, and if so, why?

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    1. Actually, Kevin, I am jazzed by the HP Slate. I like the form factor and even better, the price point, which is what has kept me from jumping into the UMPC.

      Having grown up with WinCE and WinMo, I also prefer the full OS, even with the issues that come with that, simply because I want the complete operability with all my other Windows-based computers and the flexibility to do what I want with the Slate, instead of being tied to a minimalist environment. I really don’t want to wait for someone to make an app for that before I can do what I do on my other computers.

      So yeah, I’m seriously stoked about the Slate.

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    2. The main advantage I can think of for a full-blown desktop OS is format support. The iPhone and (likely) the iSlate/iPad/iTablet doesn’t support Flash video, DivX, Xvid, WMV or mkv without desktop conversion. It’s completely useless for watching things like Hulu. General Flash support is important when surfing the web regardless of video content.

      Maybe it’s just me, but I really hate the feeling of surfing and knowing that I’m missing some part of the site. It’s worlds better now than it was years ago when I used 3 different browsers on my Sony Ericsson P900, each for different sets of sites, but I’m still not really satisfied with the surfing experience I get on mobile phones.

      I’ll call myself conditionally jazzed. I want to see more of the specs and pricing on the device first and how it handles HD video before committing to jazzedness.

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    3. GoodThings2Life Tuesday, January 26, 2010

      I’m jazzed by it… as long as it still has a stylus option for inking. Otherwise, it’s worthless to me.

      Frankly, one of the factors I LOVE about it is knowing it will run a full-blown OS rather than some watered down experience. Why? I want to decide what I do with my devices, not have my experience decided on for me by whatever the OS allows.

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    4. There are gazillion ARM multimedia web pad running some flavor of Android planned (some of them looking decent), so I am looking forward to this thing, which seems to bring a quality design and components to the slate touch PC realm currently saturated by no name venders using resistive touch and crap case designs.

      At the end of the day, I can’t justify having a giant ARM web device to carry around when I have a tiny phone that does the same. And I really don’t want to bother converting all my video and docs to something that works on ARM level. I need to access word, photoshop, the web using firefox and all of it’s extensions, etc. when I bother to carry something around that size.

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  2. I still don’t quite understand the niche for a small device like this solely for media consumption. Maybe it’s just me, but at some point I imagine that I’d want the unit to do a little more than just play movies and browse webpages.

    As Kevin and GT2L have mentioned, why waste what Win 7 has to offer?

    /scratches head

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    1. Nothing prevents you from using the other aspects of Win 7 on this. That’s why it’s using Win7! Who gives a crap about how they market it, as long as it does what you want it to do?

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  3. I’m waiting for the Android version (that was rumored to be coming, at CES).

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