Summary:

Android-based phone owners that are also Verizon FIOS customers now have access to a free app that enables remote control of the service. In the meantime, Nexus One owners may have a fix for the 3G connectivity problems that’s been plaguing so many of them.

Android-based phone owners that are also Verizon FIOS customers now have access to a free app that enables remote control of the service. Once the app is downloaded from the Android Market and activated to a given home FIOS control box, users can use it to browse TV listings, set shows to be recorded via DVR and more. If you’re the type who always rushes out of the house without remembering to program the device on which you watch your favorite shows, it’s a pretty handy app.

And if you’re an early adopter, the FCC web site is a good place to spot new gadgets before they’re announced. One such gadget that appeared this week is a smartbook running atop of Android from none other than HP. Details on the HP Compaq AirLife 100 are few and far between, but it appears to be an ARM-based smartbook with Android on board, much like the concept smartbook that HP was quietly showing folks at CES a few weeks ago.

And Nexus One owners suffering from the 3G connectivity issue we mentioned last week, take note: My jkOnTheRun co-editor, Kevin, discovered a simple settings change on his Nexus One that fixed the problem. Some readers indicated the change fixed their connectivity issues, too, but others are still seeing the slower connections. The only sure thing about this issue is that neither Google nor T-Mobile have acknowledged it, much less sanctioned a way to solve it.

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