105 Comments

Summary:

Update: Thanks to everyone for weighing in about the infographic. The data used was given to us on an exclusive basis from analytics firm Flurry. Indeed, three-quarters of the apps in the App Store are “paid apps,” which was used to calculate the average app price […]

Update: Thanks to everyone for weighing in about the infographic. The data used was given to us on an exclusive basis from analytics firm Flurry. Indeed, three-quarters of the apps in the App Store are “paid apps,” which was used to calculate the average app price and the subsequent revenue figures in the previous version. However, only one-quarter of the apps actually downloaded are “paid apps,” so the average price per transaction (paid + free downloads) is actually much lower than the average app price in the store. The graphic has been updated to reflect this price. Also, some of the averages in the Flurry data were calculated using projected user numbers from the first quarter 2010; that has been corrected to reflect only data up to the end of the year.

For clarification purposes, here is the math:

According to Flurry, Average listed price of a paid app: $3.63

74% of apps listed in the app store are paid.
Average listed price of an app (including free): 3.63 x .74 = 2.70 (with rounding)

Only 1/4 of downloaded apps are paid.
Average price paid for  an app (including free): 3.63 X .25 = .91

While we make every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information contained in our posts, sometimes errors make their way onto our site, and this was one of them. We deeply regret any confusion this may have caused. Please accept our apologies.

best, Om

Related GigaOM Pro Research Report: Surveying the Mobile App Store Landscape

Graphic courtesy of Column Five Media

  1. Wow! what a great way of showing the potential, well done! You guys should check out http://www.appboy.com too they have done a great job of helping developers get discovered.

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  2. And thats why we created http://www.appboy.com, the social network for App Developers and Users. There is so much potential here, Awesome post Guys!

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  3. I really loved the data and the display of this report! Thanks for being so cool.

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  4. Vijay Adusumilli Tuesday, January 12, 2010

    Sorry, I am missing something here. Are users dowloading 3.7 paid or total number of applications per month? If it is the former, then total number of downloads (4 times paid) for December are 3.7x4x56M = 828.8 million. Towards end of September Apple announced 2 billion downloads and on Jan 5th Apple announced 3 billion downloads. If about 830 million of them were downloaded in December alone, App Store must have really had a very dry period in October and November. What am I missing here?

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    1. I am missing something too. Using the data above, the average paid apps cost $2.59. If 75% are free then the average including free would be closer to $0.65, correct?

      So the average iPhone user would spend closer to $2.40/month than $10.

      Showing my work!:

      .9925+1.996+2.998+3.991+4.993+5.992+6.99*4+9.99=129.5

      25+6+8+1+3+2+4+1=50

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      1. I think you’re right!

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      2. i was thinking the same exact thing..

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      3. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

        The average paid app does NOT cost $2.59!!!! Your statement implies you mean for ALL PAID APPS. You read it wrong. In DECEMBER, The average price of apps in the “Top 50 Paid Apps” section just happen to be $2.59.

        75% of apps are NOT FREE, but 75% of apps downloaded in December happened to be free.

        You had to have failed the whole word problem thing back in school, right?

        Why did you show your work? All you did was come one step shy of showing what they quoted (129.5/50= $2.59- the average)

        Could you please submit all work showing how you arrived at $2.40 per month? I want to include it in my next board meeting. Thanks.

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      4. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

        OMG!!!! I just realized that you were even more wrong than I had previously imagined.

        The “one quarter” figure (and it’s inverse, naturally) is in no way related to the $2.59 pricing figure. Multiplying them together gives you nothing more than headache. Did you actually read the piece?

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      5. Om, Sincere thanks for taking the time to make corrections to the data. Solid info-graphic. Brand win.

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      6. Dear Stupid Irishman,

        The figure of $2.40/month came from multiplying the number of apps users downloaded in a month by the average cost of an app, which is the average cost of a paid app multiplied by the percentage of downloaded apps that are not free. It is the same math that Om walks through in the update above. The exact numbers are slightly different because the original data provided by the info-graphic was different. The math is the same.

        Why did they go to the trouble to change it those of us who suggested the update are all idiots, failing the whole word problem thing back in school, and OMG this and Cheeto that? STFU.

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      7. haha your both wrong

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    2. I would assume total.

      To quote the above, “iPhone users downloaded an average of 3.7 apps in December, one quarter of which were paid.”

      Of course, the interesting part is that one quarter of 3.7 is 0.925. We’ll be nice and round that up to 1. So everybody bought an App in December. They spend $10 a month, but the average price for an App is $2.70?

      I think we might need to consider not using “averages” here. I’d love to see what the deviation is. We might want to consider using a mean or median. Do we have 1% of the customers downloading everything that’s not nailed down and the other 99% downloading very little?

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      1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

        Peter- you sound like a smart dude. Let me run this by you:

        First, the $10 figure is meta-data- all months averaged for all consumers of all app store products.

        Second, the average price quoted in the piece was only for what was in the “Top 50 Paid Apps” section of the itunes app store (it was quoted as $2.59, not $2.70).

        Why would you draw a correlation between two disparate phenomena? Also- what does deviation do for you in this story? All they are trying to do is show how kick-butt and popular the technology is. What’s the big deal?

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    3. 3.7 apps rounded up to 4
      $2.56 per app rounded up to $2.6
      comes to a grand total of
      $10.4 rounded down to $10

      The problem here is that the math continues on with all four of the apps being paid, and not just the one.

      The proper math would be:
      125 Million in Revenue Each Moth with
      37.5 Million to Apple (30%)
      87.5 Million to Developers (70%)
      $1,500,000,000 Each Year on iPhone Apps

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      1. I think you’re in the right ballpark.

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      2. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

        Thanks for not helping.

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      3. Good math but remember your pick December as your base month, not a good prediction of your full year. All those iTunes gift cards in stockings might be tilting the table.

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    4. Your point may be absolutely right, but I would like to see the forest here rather than trees.

      With due respect, by the time your calcs get done, the #s change. So the larger point is apple makes apprx $150 revenue/month ($500M x 30%). Take costs out and lets say they make (profits( of $100M/month = $1.2B/year + growth. Very decent #s – almost needle moving in the grand scale of things + incredible platform stickiness (both for users + devs). Thats the point.

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      1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

        BAM! You’ve got it, dude. (except for your agreeing with VJ- he was way screwy in his… quote)

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    5. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Vijay:
      Calm down, big boy. Yes- you are missing something- alot of somethings, actually. Your assumptions are all wrong, so you are making gobs of mistakes in your calculation. Who gives a crap, anyway, though??? And why did you start off by apologizing? That was as weird as my fascination with wanting to reply to you, I guess.

      Anyway… I’ll point out the err in your calculation after I point out the first obvious mistake on your part- to use these facts/figures for anything other than what they were meant for: To demonstrate that smartphones are a prolific technology… and maybe that people at Apple think they are really smart marketers.

      Listen, Vij- I’m worried about you over here. Take a rest on trying to figure out Apple’s revenue or total download figures or whatever. You sound like some kind of freaked-out conspiracy theorist trying to uncover the next great insider trading scam. You have poor Frioga flippin’ out over her calculator, too! (Sorry, Frioga- I had to say something)

      Here goes…

      IN DECEMBER, ONLY:
      - Of all of the dipsticks who downloaded Apps (not all Apple customers who have ever downloaded an app- JUST the December dipsticks), they averaged 3.7 apps per dipstick.
      - They never reported how many dipsticks there actually were in December, so stop trying to guess at it.
      - Using a multiplier of 4 to reverse the “one quarter” figure makes you a dipstick, too, by the way.
      - The quarter figure was meant by author to apply to the 3.7 figure. Meaning this: Every dipstick in December who downloaded 3.7 apps downloaded 2.78 free apps and .92 paid apps. Now do you see why multiplying 3.7 by 4 is really stupid and irrelevant? Hope so…
      - The 56M figure is a TOTAL CUSTOMERS of the appstore since the biginning of appstore time. Again- they never reported quantity of December-only customers. This is your largest calculation mistake: combining facts/figures that aren’t related to each other. You are making me feel like a complete NERD in having to explain this to you… and now I’m starting to feel idiotic for even entertaining your question. (DAMN my obsessive-compulsive need to correct idiots) :-(
      - The billions of downloads figure (though never reported in this piece, but since you referenced it, and it feels fun to explain… I will). This number you read about in the National Inquirer refers to the number of TOTAL APP DOWNLOADS since they started offering app downloads a year and a half ago.
      - I am so PISSED that I spent all of this time replying to you. Please don’t ask any more questions so I don’t get sucked in.

      p.s.- Frioga got it all wrong, too, so don’t feel bad.

      Share
  5. [...] much impact are we talking about? This awesome info-graphic at GigaOm sums it up quite nicely with numbers ranging from the average application approval time, the [...]

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  6. [...] app is $2.70 or that the average iPhone owner spends $10 a month on apps? GigaOm has put together a snazzy infographic breaking down the economy of the App Store with dozens of tasty morsels of [...]

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  7. [...] much impact are we talking about? This awesome info-graphic at GigaOm sums it up quite nicely with numbers ranging from the average application approval time, the [...]

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  8. [...] 13-1-2010] Giga Om’s TheApple App Store Economy provides sales figures for December 2009 that suggest the iPhone/iTouch’s 56 million + users [...]

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  9. Please note that we have updated both the average cost and subsequent revenue generation figures.

    thanks, best, Carolyn

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Stellar piece, Carolyn.

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  10. Awesome article, great image, and great research. The apple app store is definitely in huge demand right now. Its going to be interesting to watch to grow even more in the future! Also check out http://www.PhoneFreelancer if you have an app idea, its a website connecting entrepreneurs with iphone developers, for free.

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  11. How is it that each iphone/touch users spend $10 per month when users only download less than 1 paid app(a quarter of 3.7 apps) each month? If we round up that the users download 1 paid app each month and the average cost of an paid app is
    $2.59, then the average amount the users spend per month should be $2.59 not $10.

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Stop doing math before you hurt yourself!

      The 3.7 figure is from December, only.

      The $10 figure is meta-data covering all months, all users.

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  12. The numbers for revenues are all wrong. There is no way the app store is generating more than $500mn per month.

    From Sept 2009 to Jan 2010, 1bn apps were downloaded according to Apple, both paid and free. That makes to be 71mn paid apps per month (1bn * 0.25 paid apps / 3.5 months). Even assuming $2.59 average price, that makes to be $180mn per month in revenues. AND $2.59 is not a reasonable average price. The $0.99 apps are likely to be downloaded much more than just a simple average of the top 50 apps will show.

    Please correct me if I’m wrong. But otherwise, it is shocking irresponsible how anyone can put such numbers up.

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Ian:

      The 1B figure is September 2008 (not 2009) to January 2010- that’s about 16 months of downloads and revenue. That changes your analysis quite a bit, right? Glass houses, brother… You don’t happen to work for Google, do you?

      It would be appropriate to assume $2.59 is the average price for ALL paid app, but $2.59 was the average price for only the “Top 50 Paid Apps” in December.

      Stop getting all dramatic about “responsibility” & go back to work. You do have a job, right?

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      1. Let me clarify, on 28th Sept 2009, Apple announced 2bn apps downloaded. On 5th Jan 2010, Apple announced 3bn apps downloaded. Between this period from Sept 2009 to Jan 2010, 1bn apps were download (3-2).

        This is important to me as I run an iPhone startup. Knowing such numbers is the bread-and-butter of our business.

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  13. If I was not viewing this page right now on my iPod touch I would be a little outraged!! How many american dollars do you think are leaving the states each day?!?

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  14. approval is spelled wrong

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  15. Numbers don’t compute. Hard to believe. Would someone from Gigaom speak up and explain these figures please?

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Dude- if your that interested, then why don’t you get off of your butt & dig into the sources listed? Lazy!

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      1. S.I., The form “your” is possessive. I believe you meant to use the contraction, you’re. Your grammar skills could be up to your numerate skills when you’re (you are) able to differentiate between the two.

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      2. Actually Stan you’re wrong. Read again before you try being a smart-ass.

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  16. [...] Gigaom.com hat die Zahlen rund um Apples AppStore anschaulich aufbereiten lassen: [...]

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  17. [...] geeft maandelijks $10 aan applicaties uit. Nog niet genoeg van de cijfers? Dan is op GigaOM het volledige overzicht te [...]

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  18. woa, pretty impressive stats!

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  19. [...] heutige Pic of the Day kommt von gigaom, ist etwas größer und erläutert plakativ mit Fakten den App Store [...]

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  20. [...] inte heller denna underbara illustration över hur App Store-ekonomin [...]

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  21. According to this, iPhone developers are earning an average of $12,500.00 per month from App Store sales. Nice little earner – that works out to $150,000 per year.

    However, I think the real numbers are skewed somewhat, as we hear of a handful earning over $1m per year, and LOTS of smaller dev shops earning a pittance (i.e. a few hundred dollars) per year.

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Consider this: each “developer” registered with Apple most likely has several submitting under the same developer account. Unless you are in the top of that bell curve for earnings distribution, you are not making much at all & that is most cases.

      Share
  22. The developer figure is interesting. I wonder though how many of them simply built something quick, threw it in the AppStore and hoped for the best.

    Just like every business iPhone app development requires a long term and end-to-end strategy.

    Great post though.

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  23. [...] Gigaom hat die in den letzten Tagen zu Hauf veröffentlichten Zahlen zum iPhone, dem AppStore und dem Kaufverhalten der iPhone-Besitzer in eine übersichtliche Infografik gegossen und das 4200 Pixel lange Bild hier veröffentlicht. Die Grafik ist – vor allem für all jene unter euch, denen die Statistiken üblicherweise eher auf den Keks gehen – definitiv einen Kick wert. [...]

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  24. [...] GigaOM hebben ze de App Store economie samengevat in afbeelding. Bekijk hem op GigaOM.com AKPC_IDS += "3233,"; (0 stemmen)  Loading …   [...]

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  25. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money's in apps. [...]

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  26. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money's in apps. [...]

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  27. [...] Por Delete All en Jan.13, 2010, bajo Varios Gracias a esta gráfica podemos entender un poco más el modelo de negocio que Apple forjó con su App Store, y ver más claramente lo que muchos se niegan a entender: el verdadero dinero está en las aplicaciones, más que en vender iPhones. Visto en Gigaom [...]

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  28. [...] למעבר לאינפוגרפיקה לחצו כאן Categories: 1 תגים:appstore, אפל, כלכלה תגובות (0) טראקבאקים (0) כתיבת תגובה טראקבאק [...]

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  29. [...] The Apple App Store Economy – GigaOM. [...]

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  30. [...] Gigaom.com hat die wichtigsten Fakten zum Thema App Store in diesem (etwas großen) Bild zusammengefasst: [...]

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  31. [...] infográfico a seguir criado pela GigaOm, temos uma ideia melhor do que é a App Store e o quão importante ela é tanto para o iPhone/iPod [...]

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  32. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money's in apps. [...]

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  33. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money’s in apps. [...]

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  34. [...] bez wątpienia ciekawa. Danymi odnośnie działania AppStore zainteresował się także serwis GigaOm i postanowił sporządzić jego krótkie podsumowanie, które zostało zawarte na jednym obrazku. [...]

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  35. [...] Booming [Apps] We’ve already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money’s in apps. [...]

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  36. [...] that around 17 percent of the 3 billion app store downloads, or 510 million, were paid apps (though we found 1 in 4 in December, so that number seems to be growing), that means that the number of pirated apps is somewhere in [...]

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  37. [...] Gigaom created a nice Apple App Store Economy Visualization. They say there are 133.979 iPhone applications, made by over 28.000 developers, who wait an average of 4.78 days for their app’s approval. The app store users downloaded an average of 3.7 apps each in december. And each iPhone user spends an average of $10 on apps every month. for full details check gigaom. How much do you spend a month in the app store? [...]

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  38. Well Done! you all should also check out http://www.theapplegoogle.com, they are also great!

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  39. [...] d’après les chiffres publiés sur GigaOM, ça donne ça [...]

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  40. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money’s in apps. [...]

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  41. This inability to do simple maths is just an embarrasment for GigaOM. They should take it down.
    Mobile apps are a fantastic growth market but for a dose of reality (and some real numbers) read Tomi Ahonen:
    http://communities-dominate.blogs.com/brands/2010/01/the-apps-stores-are-as-irrelevant-to-mobile-telecoms-as-seguay-is-to-cars.html

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      You know- the math errors are mostly due to the format/layout of the text of the piece. I think people are getting confused because of the layout. The data is all correct, though, so if you’re going to start faulting people for crappy math skills, start with Vijay (up top).

      Share
  42. [...] Seite Gigaom.com hat die die wichtigsten Daten zum AppStore in einem “riesen Bild” [...]

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  43. [...] http://gigaom.com/2010/01/12/the-apple-app-store-economy/ AKPC_IDS += "799,"; Hello there! If you are new here, you might want to subscribe to the RSS [...]

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  44. This is an AWESOME diagram! App users get good money from this. Go into the app business people. :D

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      Really bad advice- stay out of the App business, people. There are already WAY too many.

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      1. irish, your so pessimistic.

        Russell, get into the app business, keep an open mind and think outside the box (app). Not everyone is making big money, but failure doesn’t hurt that much. Its a competitive market, that’s always good for the consumer.

        The app market is only getting started, the iPhone is still young, and as new companies look to develop apps and mobile sites to complement their websites, developers will be in demand for a long time.

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  45. [...] GigaOM hebben ze niet stil gezeten! Ze hebben namelijk de Appstore in kaart gebracht. De cijfers: – [...]

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  46. [...] (e quanto) com o iPhone. Pois parece que isso vai virar tradição: de ontem pra hoje, o site trouxe um novo infográfico, focado na “Economia da App Store da [...]

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  47. [...] gigaom.com hat man sich die Mühe gemacht und alle Zahlen und Fakten des Apple AppStores in einer Grafik [...]

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  48. [...] Gigacom, invece, ha realizzato una bella immagine, raggruppando tutti i dati rilasciati da Apple, riguardanti AppStore, negli ultimi giorni. [...]

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  49. For a more dynamic / interactive view of the same dataset, AppStoreHQ lets you slice and dice all apps by price, rating and category (and shows the most-talked-about and most-tweeted-about apps): http://www.appstorehq.com/

    You can do the same with the developer base: http://www.appstorehq.com/developers

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  50. [...] Gigaom ha realizzato un’immagine che sintetizza tutti i numeri di iPhone e AppStore. [...]

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  51. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money’s in [...]

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  52. Always nice to see information communicated so effectively

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    1. Yes pretty diagram and nice presentation but total nonsense content, as commented in the rest of the thread – the sums don’t add up – the conclusions on revenue at the end are complete fiction.

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      1. TooFineAPoint Monday, January 18, 2010

        Apple found it worthy enough to put in to their web-site so couldn’t be that nonsensical, no? Here’s Om’s tweet:

        OMG. Woke up this morning to find one of our stories from @gigaom linked on Apple.com Hot News page. Awesome. http://bit.ly/rMAgP 5:59 AM Jan 16th from Tweetie

        Share
  53. [...] auf Gigaom gefunden. Gibt (allerdings mit Vorsicht zu genießen) eine Vorstellung davon, was Apple mit den App [...]

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  54. “million” is misspelled in the first pie graph.

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  55. [...] We’ve all suspected that the majority of revenues in the iPhone/iPod touch ecosystem were in the applications. Now we know, thanks to GigaOm. [...]

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  56. Wow.. makes me want to become an app developer now… too bad i’m one in a million lazy people that would much rather buy and download the apps. lol.

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    1. Stupid Irishman Wednesday, January 13, 2010

      You think you are lazy? I don’t want to get up for lunch, so I’m eating Cheetos while surfing the net (the “puffs” kind- they are probably filled with crack, as I can’t stop eating the damn things).

      Share
  57. [...] already followed the iPhone money, but this follow-up infographic from GigaOm proves what we suspected all along: the real money’s in apps. [...]

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  58. [...] you want to argue about the content of the report, you can go to GigaOm’s page here and join the debate, [...]

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  59. [...] The Apple App Store Economy – GigaOMRemember when no one downloaded apps to their phones? That was so not very long ago. [...]

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  60. [...] schreiben. Das einzige was ich sagen kann ist nur, dass ich diese Aufbereitung der Information von gigaom einfach klasse finde. In sich einfach schlüssig und super gedacht bringt es einem nicht so [...]

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  61. [...] Hyffsade siffror! För att läsa mer besök GIGAOM [...]

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  62. [...] for the next mobile Apple device, what’s happening with apps on the current ones? Although the App Store Economy is huge, piracy is pretty darn big too from what I read. Could it be true that the iTunes App Store [...]

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  63. [...] the same point, Gigaom has a great graphic on the size of iPhone application market, which blew my mind: $500 million a month in iPhone application revenue.  So much for my instinct [...]

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  64. [...] GigaOm has this infographic for the numbers from Apple’s App Store.  I don’t think that anyone, even the folks at Apple, could have imagined numbers on this scale just a couple of years ago.  And it’s one reason that the iPhone will be so difficult to dethrone – so many of the apps on my iPhone are things that have become a part of my daily digital life.  Yes, many do exist in one form or another on other platforms, but I think Apple’s reign will continue for at least the next few years. Click on the image below (and then, optionally, click on it again in the following page) to see the full sized image. [...]

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  65. [...] cost of paid apps: $2.59200 Million apps downloaded monthly.See the full graphic on their site.The Apple App Store Economy – GigaOM. document.getElementById("post-10995-blankimage").onload(); About the Author: Randall Hand Randall [...]

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  66. [...] Check it out [...]

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  67. [...] this GigaOm visual representation of the iPhone and iPod touch App Store Economy is massive? Check out that [...]

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  68. [...] The Apple App Store Economy Users spend an average of $10 on apps every month? I'm definitely not an average user then. (tags: apple iphone apps statistics appstore) [...]

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  69. [...] The Apple App Store Economy Related GigaOM Pro Research: Surveying the Mobile App Store Landscape [...]

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  70. [...] this GigaOm visual representation of the iiphone and iPod touch App Store Economy is massive? Check out that [...]

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  71. I think the figures are still wrong.

    The average cost of “Top 50 paid” apps is $2.59 which is
    129.5 divided by 50. But there are 3 times more free app downloads than paid apps. So if we want to get the average
    cost of “Both Paid & Free” apps, we need to
    divide 129.5 by 200(addition of original 50 + 3 times of that) not 50 and we get $0.6475 not $0.91.

    This is about 30% less figure than the original and so all the rest should be fixed by this amount making monthly total
    revenue of Apple app economy approximately $175 million not $250 million.

    Correct me if I’m wrong.

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  72. [...] The Apple App Store Economy – GigaOM [...]

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  73. [...] they are. From GigaOm. And … these really are big numbers With over 56 million users, 200 million apps are being [...]

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  74. [...] Gigaom.com a publié quelques chiffres concernant l’App Store : L’App Store contient 133 979 applications provenant de 28 000 développeurs. Le temps moyen avant l’approbation d’une application est de 4,78 jours… (lire la suite) [...]

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  75. [...] site gigaom.com vient de publier une illustration intéressante, puisqu’elle lève le voile sur quelques points clés de l’AppStore. Par exemple, [...]

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  76. [...] … O si realmente Apple saca mucho beneficio de estas ventas. Pues los chicos de GigaOM ha hecho un gráfico donde se explica muy bien todo el proceso desde que se sube una App a la [...]

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  77. [...] no podemos hablar de cifras precisas la gente de GigaOM creó la siguiente infografía para entender un poco más la economía de la [...]

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  78. [...] … O si realmente Apple saca mucho beneficio de estas ventas. Pues los chicos de GigaOM ha hecho un gráfico donde se explica muy bien todo el proceso desde que se sube una App a la [...]

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  79. [...] … O si realmente Apple saca mucho beneficio de estas ventas. Pues los chicos de GigaOM ha hecho un gráfico donde se explica muy bien todo el proceso desde que se sube una App a la [...]

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  80. [...] GigaOM] // Related ContentAre iPhone Third-Party App Developers Doomed?App developers have [...]

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  81. [...] schéma, créé par GigaOm résume plutôt bien l’activité de l’AppStore, et donne un aperçu rapide de la réussite [...]

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  82. [...] … O si realmente Apple saca mucho beneficio de estas ventas. Pues los chicos de GigaOM ha hecho un gráfico donde se explica muy bien todo el proceso desde que se sube una App a la [...]

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  83. [...] The Apple App Store Economy A neat infographic summarizing the Apple app store economy. [...]

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  84. [...] made the most money from selling iPod touches and iPhones, you would be sadly mistaken.  As this infographic from gigaom.com shows, the real money is made in the apps.  View the full-size infographic [...]

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  85. If you’re looking at the App Store economy from the developers’ perspective it’s also important to note the top heavy distribution of paid apps as indicated in this chart:

    http://www.pinchmedia.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Slide4.png

    Source (PinchMedia – now Flurry)
    http://www.pinchmedia.com/blog/paid-applications-on-the-app-store-from-360idev/

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  86. [...] Grafik wiederum wurde auf Gigaom.com [...]

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  87. [...] UPDATED: The Apple App Store Economy Update: Thanks to everyone for weighing in about the infographic. The data used was given to us on an exclusive basis [...] [...]

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  88. Thank god we have people like Stupid Irishman sitting on the computer all day policing our internet sites. I dun tell ya, all dat fancy math of yers jus’ blows my mind!

    Share
    1. Michael, It’s not “fancy math.” It’s called the ability to read, think, and apply sound reasoning. You appear to be embracing ignorance by your comment. Not a good side of any argument to be on.

      Share
      1. Thanks for the clever analysis. Boy, you sure got me there. Next time I’ll be more careful before I say something that could be interpreted as “embracing ignorance.”

        Share
  89. In support to the stupid Irishman, some people really have lots of time trying to prove other people wrong. If they just would read the article all through. Even at the end of the article they state, quote: “While we make every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information contained in our posts, sometimes errors make their way onto our site, and this was one of them. We deeply regret any confusion this may have caused. Please accept our apologies.”

    Not all info is there to make any assumption listed above. These are only various statements to show how well App Store is doing. If you want to know how much money Apple made in the last quarter you need more info than listed in the gigaom article.

    In case I may have spelled any word wrongly, I ask for forgiveness from the spelling freaks, since math is not their strength.

    And for the conspiracy theorists, I would look at 9/11 and the swine flue, for that matter, this should give you enough to dive into.

    For the rest of us, enjoy the world and be happy….

    Share
    1. TooFineAPoint Monday, January 18, 2010

      Agree 100%. As soon as this article came out, I asked the smarties here to look at the forest and not the trees; I guess I was barking up the wrong tree.

      Share
    2. Nitwit,
      What makes anyone who notices and points out an error in a written forum, a spelling freak?
      What makes anyone who notices and points out an error in arithmetic (nothing more nor less), unable to spell correctly?
      Nothing.
      It is possible to enjoy the world and be happy.
      Yes.
      Must that be at the expense of numeracy, literacy, and the ability to soundly reason?
      No.

      Share
      1. And here too, I agree. But when I read through this or any written forum, I find so many halfwits trying to prove others wrong. Everyone makes mistakes and at the same time everyone thinks he is the only one in the world who is right. What is ‘right’ in the eyes of an observer? Especially in this time and age when every halfwit can publish the accumulated garbage of his mind in a written forum. Read above and find that I am not too far off.
        Who cares if someone writes a report even if there seem to be some differences, or how much money Apple makes, as long as the programers get their share, the IRS get their money and some funky investors get their profits. What does it concern for Tim and Henry on the exact details of Apple’s earnings with their AppStore. The store seems a good idea and it makes money… and it has nothing to do with me or Tim and Henry.

        Share
  90. Actually, 70% goes to the SELLERS each month, which quite often are NOT the app developers, but software contractors and development houses. I’ve developed dozens of iPhone apps for clients, just as I have desktop applications. It’s the other side of the app store economy that gets overlooked. And, because a “great idea” for software can vary wildly from person to person, for many of those clients, I make more than they ever do. iPhone/iPod users are notoriously cheap when it comes to paying for apps, so the return on investment can be negligible. It’s laughable considering how much we pay for the devices and to our cell carriers like ATT monthly. A typical sentiment seems to be, “I won’t pay more than $0.99 for an app a few times a year, but I’ll pay $90USD+ to ATT every month.”

    I also believe that >80% of the 28,000 developers would not be considered “developers” by professional developers who have experience and a software development background, such as myself. Rather, they’re hacks who think that “I can do it too” without understanding the first thing about software design and development. I mean, “iPhone developers” have even sold sample code that Apple provided on the App Store as their own (the Bubble Level sample, for one). Selling software that someone gave you to demonstrate something (in that case, the accelerometer) takes no skill, just arrogance.

    This is why there’s so much crap on the app store that either doesn’t work, is stupid and pointless or is incorrectly written and crashes. The “app store economy” has made people think that software design and development is basically an unskilled job, which it definitely isn’t, even on the iPhone.

    There are too many people who have no business being iPhone developers and wouldn’t be, except for the fact that Apple has made the barrier to entry too low. There’s a reason you don’t see 80+ fart applications and about as many bikini applications in Best Buy. Good concept development and software design and development is expensive, as is shelf space and marketing. Those are great filters for keeping crap off retail shelves.

    The downside of the App Store is also the upside of it– if you have $99 for a developer account and a computer to play “software developer” on you can be an “iPhone developer.” That doesn’t mean you’re qualified to develop software any more than building a birdhouse in my basement qualifies me to build houses for those people to live in.

    To become an “iPhone developer,” Apple should really require that you’ve taken at least one “intro to programming” class sometime in your life. The number of “iPhone developers” would probably be cut in half if that were the case and the quality of the average app would go up considerably. It still would leave many unqualified “developers” releasing crApps, but it would be a start.

    Share
    1. Doh. Botched up my first line. It should have read something like:

      “Actually, 70% goes to the APP SELLERS each month. Quite often, apps are not developed by the sellers, but by software contractors and development houses, for the sellers.”

      Share
  91. Your math is flawed. It is not logical to include items which haven’t been purchased when calculating the average price paid. This is like saying the average price I paid for a car over the course of my lifetime is includes the cost of Ferraris, Volkswagens and Rolls Royces when in fact all I’ve ever purchased was used Fords. You’re also not accounting for the weighting some applications have over others. For example, 25 of the top 50 apps were $.99 while only one app was $9.99. So although the average list price is apps is $2.70 the actually average price of the top 50 selling is only $2.59. And because only one if four apps is paid we could divide the actual average purchase price of the top 50 apps, i.e. $2.59, by four to get the actual average price paid per app. So the average price paid per app is only $0.6475. Apple takes 30% of this, leaving $0.45 per app sold for the developer.

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  92. wow, google, nokia or others has no chance in front of the system created by apple, maybe with the hardware, but in this sector is important the software part also, there is a software for everything…in the appstore

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  93. Absolutely brilliant summary of key data! Please say more!
    Stuart

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  94. I dispute this 30% that Apple are always credited with receiving

    Of course for every dollar spent on itunes vouchers or credit Apple retain 30%, but it is never reported that only a part of that is profit.

    In addition to the infrastructure and staffing cost for the app store there is some profit margin for retailers of iTunes vouchers
    Apple also cover promoting the app store and then vouchers are often available as giveaways with iPods or discounted when multiples are purchased.

    I purchased $250 AU for somewhere between $150 and $180 in 2007 and have done a similar thing several times since, most recently purchasing at least six pairs of $20 vouchers for $30/pair

    Does Apple , the retailer or the Developer cover this heavy discounting?
    I suspect it is most likely to be Apple since I have never heard a developer complain that he didn’t receive his 70% because the voucher used was purchased at a discounted price and retailers don’t like to sell things at a loss.

    BTW – Cool Graphic

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  95. Thanx alzo for yor Eksellent dysplay of amerycan logyk, math, and speling skils. it explanes alot of thingz goin on in yor wunderful cuntry. an yor the wuns wit fansy compyters. an fotoshop kant fix yor problms.

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  96. [...] Gigaom created a nice Apple App Store Economy Visualization. They say there are 133,979 iPhone applications, made by over 28,000 developers, who wait an average of 4.78 days for their app’s approval. The app store users downloaded an average of 3.7 apps each in december. And each iPhone user spends an average of $10 on apps every month. for full details check gigaom. How much do you spend a month in the App Store? [...]

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  97. Forgive me if someone else has posted this, but what is the average monthly / yearly earnings for each developer, based on these figures?

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  98. “keep on keeping on”.

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  99. [...] anche dopo la segnalazione nelle Hot News di Apple, che il sito GigaOM (su piazza da tempo) ha raccolto in info-grafica una serie di dati interessanti su App Store USA: [...]

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  100. Fantastic info-graphic. I keep wondering if there it might have made more sense if it was split into various sections instead on one really long image :) Otherwise, cheers to the work and concept behind it.

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  101. [...] O conteúdo dele realmente é bem vasto, e se você não teve a oportunidade de conhecer a App Store em mais detalhes, pode considerá-lo como leitura obrigatória. Para visualizá-lo (com algumas notas adicionais do editor), clique aqui. [...]

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  102. [...] http://gigaom.com/2010/01/12/the-apple-app-store-economy/ Posté par Vincent le 18 janvier 2010 à 3h17 blog comments powered by Disqus var disqus_url = 'http://www.la-grande-petite-agence.com/blog/?p=167 '; var disqus_container_id = 'disqus_thread'; var facebookXdReceiverPath = 'http://www.la-grande-petite-agence.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/disqus-comment-system/xd_receiver.htm'; var DsqLocal = { 'trackbacks': [ ], 'trackback_url': 'http://www.la-grande-petite-agence.com/blog/wp-trackback.php?p=167' }; © Copyright La grande petite agence 2010 | Web Tv Prod | Macluhans | Propulsé par WordPress [...]

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  103. [...] This graphic, representing the economy of the Apple iPhone App Store, is pretty crazy. $250 million in revenues generated just from apps! It almost makes me want to learn how to be both creative and adept at programming. [...]

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  104. Gigaom.com, et al.
    Thank you for this Web page and the responses. As a graphic designer responsible for making informational graphics, I found the various responses most enlightening. I must remain mindful of the sub-standard education possessed by the majority of decision-making individuals. My “Don’t confuse me with facts, my mind is made-up” poster over my desk has renewed significance.
    I’m not sure that the graphic is a good one. I feel that an informational graphic should clarify and make points more understandable. Otherwise the effort only gives rise to F.U.D. (fear, uncertainty, doubt) which is counter-productive, possibly destructive.
    I think a good graphic presentation of data allows the viewer to get actionable information from it. (Definition: If you don’t know what to do with it, it’s only data. Information is something you can use. Thus, you can’t have information overload, only data overload.) The discussion about the graphic(s?) leads me to conclude that nothing was clarified by the graphics. Clarification came in the ensuing discussion. Had the discussion been lacking, several would have come to erroneous conclusions from the graphic(s?) alone.
    I disagree that correct grammar, spelling, logic, and arithmetical skills are mutually exclusive.
    Thank you, everyone, for this eye-opener disguised as a Web page.

    Share
    1. Thanks for the insightful analysis Stan! My “The World is Filled With Arrogant Bastards” poster over my desk has renewed significance. I would question how many of us sub-standardly educated Americans will be able to understand your fancy rhetoric and logic though. Maybe you’re wasting your time.

      Share
      1. Thanks for that. Your reply shows that Ignorance and apathy trumps education and attention to detail. My job is to make things simpler to understand. You’re the reason I work at what I do successfully and get paid as much as I do get paid.
        Michael, I didn’t mention Americans. Do you think that all decision making individuals are only American? How arrogant! Speaking of arrogance, how did you come to that startling conclusion? Since you brought the issue up, one of the reasons the United States of America must import intellectual assets is that there is a shortage of suitable home-grown talent. You might find what you’re after with some humility, yourself.

        Share
      2. Your response?

        Share
    2. The second sentence in your latest response shows that ignorance comes before attention to detail, at least in your mind. Check your subject-verb agreement; oh, and ignorance shouldn’t be capitalized. Also, using the phrase, “get paid” twice in the same sentence is clumsy word usage. As a professor of chemistry, I realize that attention to detail is important, but too much attention to detail and not enough attention to the overall “picture” can become a form of ignorance, in and of itself. You’re doing just the thing I am parodying at the opening of this response. You are picking through responses and finding some detail, small error, or mistyped word. Then you correct the trivial mistake in some half-baked response in which you preach about your own superiority and high-paying job.

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      1. “Too much attention to detail … can become a form of ignorance, in and of itself.” A professor of chemistry. Neat. Which branch within that large discipline? Do you publish? Who proofreads your work? Who illustrates your findings? How credible do you think you and/or your information sources would be with errors in basic arithmetic, spelling, grammar, or logic? You’re bashing the person trained and hired to make folks like you look good in books, journals, and periodicals. I find that astonishing, quite frankly. As a teacher, you must have some opinions about the direction of your flock. Everything going OK, in your observations? All “800″ SAT scores?
        I’m telling you, and any others that may have tuned in, that I have undeserved job security solely due to things that should be built-in for those able to find a place to express themselves. Tell me you disagree with that. (Don’t, please.) [Not so] “Stupid Irishman” got my attention and others (you included) pulled me out of lurk mode. I would regret the time lost; but, it became a forum for me to rant about the Ignorance and apathy i witness.
        We might have different takes on the meaning of parody. I thought it more sardonic. Humour is difficult enough to handle by professionals.

        Share
      2. Michael,
        FWIW, I checked with a neighbor of mine who agrees with you that I come across as being arrogant. BTW, I’m not turning my back on you, the “Reply” doesn’t seem to have worked in my last couple of posts. The thread may be winding down. Before I forget, have a healthy (most of all) and happy new year despite the rancor between us, here.

        Share
      3. Thanks. I enjoyed our discussion on this forum and I wish you a healthy, happy New Year as well. Just out of curiosity, what country are you from?

        Share
      4. Born: Portland, Maine.
        Moved: Montreal, Quebec (not that far away-many yanks here, also-very different view of the world)
        Dual Citizen: 1991

        Michael, the pleasure was mine.

        Share
  105. If you don’t know how to produce an app to become richer, just buy APPLE STOCK. The end result will be similar.

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  106. [...] The Apple App Store Economy Gigaom, Jan. 12, 2010, [...]

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  107. [...] The Apple App Store Economy Gigaom, Jan. 12, 2010, [...]

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  108. [...] RSS feed for updates on this topic.Powered by WP Greet Box Excellent graphic via the boys at Gigaom showing the ecosystem around the ITMS/iPhone App [...]

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  109. A very fair and balanced article and useful stats
    See 18 javari Apps for iPhone and iPod touch on iTunes
    20,000 downloads in 75+ countries
    http://itunes.com/apps/javaricom
    Cybereditor
    javari.com
    New York NY

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  110. [...] une représentation graphique très réussie des chifres clés de l’Apple Store éditée par GigaOM : Partager ce [...]

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  111. The comments on this story get more and more bitchy and irrelevant by the day. It might be a good time to close them.

    Having said that, it bugs me when businesses use comments on other people’s articles for self-promotion. It has a faint scent of “sleaze” about it. Well.. maybe not so faint.

    Okay, there’s MY bitch-moan. “Next!”

    Share
  112. [...] this GigaOm visual representation of the iPhone and iPod touch App Store Economy is massive? Check out that [...]

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  113. [...] App Store stats, Top 10 app games of 2009, and 40 best free apps from PC [...]

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  114. [...]   Apps and the app industry have seen a lot of news coverage, lately. From app developers showing 100 percent transparency about their numbers to reports being released on the Apple App economy. [...]

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  115. [...] “economics” de l’App store. Ils sont d’ailleurs très impressionnants. Le post complet est ici sur Gigaom. Merci à mon ami Jdef pour le [...]

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  116. [...] Iphone App Store Economy is just amazing. On average, an app developer earns upwards of US $6000 per month on the app store. [...]

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  117. [...] note that it includes the down­load of paid and free appli­ca­tions. The research group Gigom has cal­cu­lated that approx­i­mately ¾’s of the appli­ca­tions dow… (please, visit that link for a beau­ti­ful visu­al­iza­tion of this [...]

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  118. [...] is fantastic, an infographic from Gigaom which analyses the sales of apps on the iphone/ipod touch done in a format which makes for a [...]

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  119. Great Information :)

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  120. [...] The Apple App Store Economy – GigaOMWhao! Really liking this infographic format! [...]

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  121. [...] Number crunchers GigaOm have made an interesting infographic, tracking how people are using the app store. Click here for the full read, or on the image below. [...]

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  122. [...] successful has this model been for Apple? Check out this infographic created by GigaOm. Some of the numbers included in the [...]

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  123. Antony Ashton Sunday, January 24, 2010

    They should put that on toilet paper: App store facts. Each little bit has 1 fact on it.

    Share
  124. [...] Gigoam recently released a glimpse into the Apple App Store economy. One interesting thing is that in December 2009, developers realized $175 million in revenue. Conventional wisdom has always held that most iPhone users only want free apps. While it’s true that three-quarters of downloaded apps were free, the other one-quarter resulted in a significant chunk of change.  The second interesting thing is that nearly 300 million apps were downloaded in December 2009 alone. We’re going on record now–if your target audience’s demographics overlap with the average iPhone users, then you should think about developing an app (paid or not). It’s a great way to be literally in your customer’s pocket and at their fingertips. [...]

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  125. I don’t get your calculation at the bottom of your post, Om. It seems that you are assuming that all apps have equal sales, while in reality cheaper apps tend to have higher sales than more expensive apps, which would put the average price paid per sale lower than the average price asked per app.

    Going by your math, I could post 1000 apps for $999 each, and in spite of nobody ever actually buying them, your “average price paid” would go up to $3.

    ($3.63 x .99 + $1000 x .01) x 0.24 = $3.26

    More generally, I believe that these kinds of statistics would be much better if we stopped listening to the ad firms who have never sold an app themselves and actually started polling developers.

    If a dozen developers from all over the App Store pooled their data, some with high sales, some with low sales, some with games, some with business apps, some hit-driven, some slow burners… they could assemble very reliable stats. I wonder why nobody is doing that. Is it prohibited under the Apple NDA?

    Share
    1. Yeah, I agree. That does seem to suggest that all paid apps are bought equally regardless of price, which certainly isn’t the case. (average price listed <> average price paid) However, I doubt there are a lot of apps tilting the scales like your example. The effect of the higher priced apps is probably negligible given the number of apps on the store and their tendency to be at the bottom end of the price scale.

      Discussing sales data is not prohibited by Apple, but you’d need a lot more than a dozen developers to get accurate numbers, and again you’d need to speak to the people publishing the apps, which are not necessarily the developers of the apps.

      Speaking for myself, when we develop iPhone apps for clients, the financial statements go through their accounts afterwards; we don’t ever see how many sales they actually get or what that comes out to revenue-wise. Even if we did, we wouldn’t share the info; it would need to come from the publishers themselves. I don’t believe that lower selling app publishers wouldn’t be very interested in sharing their numbers, and some companies wouldn’t release numbers either way (just as Apple doesn’t with their software) for competitive reasons.

      Of course, Apple knows these figures exactly, and they’d be the best source for accurate data, but they’re not sharing.

      Share
  126. Nice graphic!

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  127. Problem is 80% of the apps in the app store are “Shovelware”, “Trash”, worthless junk. The good stuff is buried by scammers who have 2000 apps in the store, each of which is a useless SINGLE FEATURE that can already be done by the iPhone/iPod. Apple needs to remove all this TRASH that clogs the system up, perhaps they can do this by having developers PAY a few hundred bucks for EACH APP they submit.

    Share
    1. Excellent idea. So good, in fact, this is how most mobile software worked before the iPhone! Hobbyists couldn’t penetrate those markets, so only the big companies wrote software for them.

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  128. [...] infografico di GigaOm sull’andamento di App Store spiegato al popolo. var addthis_pub = 'Macworlditalia'; var [...]

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  129. [...] y desesperación por no poder tenerlas todas.  Mientras esperamos os dejo una infografía de GigaOM que explica de una forma muy sencilla cómo ganar 250 millones de dólares al mes con las [...]

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  130. Incredible figures!! What would it be in 2015?? Thanks Gigaom!!

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  131. [...] in revenue. There are now over 58 million App Store users, each spending over $4 per month, as this Gigaom article reveals (excellent article with a really neat graphic full of stats, check it [...]

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  132. Others are right: the numbers are wrong. Here’s the problem with the math: $3.63 is not likely to be the average price paid for a downloaded app, so $3.63 x .24 isn’t a correct calculation.

    It’s very likely that most of the downloads are for the lower-priced apps (eg, $0.99), so the 25% are not likely to have an average price of $3.63. If we use the average of the top 50 as a place to start, their price averages $2.59.

    But that’s not the average price of a downloaded app, since the most-downloaded apps,with a few exceptions, tend to be the lowest price ones. (The #1 paid app gets more downloads than the #50, so we would need to weight the average price by download volume to get a better number, and even then it would only apply to the top 50, not all of the other apps.) Instead, think of $2.59 as the maximum realistic price per paid app.

    So the maximum realistic price per app, including free, is $0.65 (rounded), and the actual number is something less than that. This means that the revenue numbers ($250M in December) are too high also.

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  133. [...] gigaom.com ← Backupify – Secure Online Backup Akamai – State of the Internet Report [...]

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  134. this is important to me as I run an iPhone startup. Knowing such numbers is the bread-and-butter of our business.

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  135. [...] Post By Google News Click Here For The Entire Article Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and [...]

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  136. [...] in 2010.  That compares to $0.6 Billion worldwide in mobile advertising revenue.  Here’s a chart and story by Gigaom showing the power of mobile [...]

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  137. wowza…i wonder how my app will fare in 2010…its a truly productive one too

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  138. [...] to gigacom.com, the Apple App Store Economy has 133,979 apps for easy download that were developed by a mere [...]

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  139. [...] المنشورة عن صناعة الآي فون والآي تيونز عبر ذلك الرسم الإحصائي يمكننا أن نستخلص التالي [...]

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  140. [...] Graphic courtesy of Column Five Media via gigaom.com [...]

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  141. [...] Apple hates Flash. Hate, hate, hate. I read that it’s because they can’t control it and it crashes Mac. Even though I wish I could play some of the zillions of Flash games out there or watch Hulu on my iThing, I know it’d be stupid for Apple to support the free alternatives because of just how much money the App Store makes. [...]

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  142. [...] Se focarmos apenas na economia movimentada pela App Store, da Apple, temos os seguintes números (dados de 12 de janeiro d… [...]

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  143. [...] L’article (en anglais) donne les chiffres clés de l’économie de l’AppStore d’Apple : http://gigaom.com/2010/01/12/the-apple-app-store-economy/ [...]

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  144. I’d be interested in some details about the methodology used to get the information about the number of paid app of the total number of download. 25% seems to be huge number, I’ve seen other estimates (including my gut feeling) that this ratio is way under 10%.
    Anybody knows why this information is not officially available from Apple – suspicious. If it is 25% really, I am sure they would use it in marketing. Seen a report that with all operational expenses Apple have they just break even with what they charge from those 30% revenue split from paid apps.

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  145. [...] Hassle-Free PC wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptA clever new infographic from gigaom.com shows how the App Store puts more than 100,000 apps at your fingertips — and generates millions of dollars for app developers worldwide. [...]

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  146. [...] Malik e il suo staff ci hanno preso gusto. Dopo l’infografica che illustrava il successo di App Store, lo staff editoriale di GigaOM ha prodotto un altro riassunto per immagini che ripercorre tutte le [...]

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  147. [...] Malik e il suo staff ci hanno preso gusto. Dopo l’infografica che illustrava il successo di App Store, lo staff editoriale di GigaOM ha prodotto un altro riassunto per immagini che ripercorre tutte le [...]

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  148. [...] So beträgt die durchschnittliche Wartezeit für die Freigabe einer neuen Applikation nur 4,78 Tage. [...]

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  149. [...] my point. The App store model is the ONLY point. So 3 billion Apps have been download, of which an estimated $75million goes to Apple EACH MONTH. That’s profit btw. They didn’t develop the Apps, [...]

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  150. [...] Quelle: http://gigaom.com/2010/01/12/the-apple-app-store-economy/ [...]

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  151. [...] is why you need good content 2010 is the year of the infographic. From chickens to iPhone apps to the Denzel Washington Venn diagram, stats have never looked so sexy. At the moment I’d [...]

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  152. [...] is the year of the infographic. From chickens to iPhone apps to the Denzel Washington Venn diagram, stats have never looked so sexy. At the moment I’d have to [...]

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  153. [...] more here: The Apple App Store Economy: Infographic from gigaom.com AKPC_IDS += “66,”;Popularity: unranked [...]

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  154. it is so cool

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  155. [...] het onderzoek naar iPhone applicaties kwamen we de volgende vette data visualisatie tegen op de website van gigaom. Met een geweldige 280 miljoen gedownloade apps (in december) en een [...]

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  156. araceli Talabera Saturday, March 6, 2010

    wow this is great

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  157. [...] Gigaom.com published a graphic of the iPhone App Store Economy (as of January 12th 2010). Read more here. [...]

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  158. [...] published a graphic this month showing how Apple’s App economy generated some [...]

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  159. [...] significant application lock-in users will need to be spending far more then $50 a year on Apps [/source].  Recall, to create strong switching costs 10 years ago users spent hundreds of dollars on [...]

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  160. [...] fingertips — and generates millions of dollars for app developers worldwide. View full post on Apple Hot News var addthis_language = 'en'; [...]

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  161. [...] to help convince you to start turning those great app ideas you have into real world dollars! (via Gigaom) Share This Digital Buzz Post:Top Related Posts:iTunes Store Reaches 10 Billion DownloadsApple: [...]

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  162. [...] Full story first published by GigaOM [...]

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  163. [...] Follow this link: The Apple App Store Economy: Infographic from gigaom.com [...]

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  164. Why did they go to the trouble to change it those of us who suggested the update are all idiots, failing the whole word problem thing back in school, and OMG this and Cheeto that? STFU.

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    1. Casual Observer Thursday, March 18, 2010

      @chacha
      Please, don’t take this personally; but, you’re a shockingly incoherent, ignorant individual. Instead of trying to edit your post to make any sense at all, why not keep your tiny brain better occupied with some homework? You sure could use remedial grammar. Does your mother know you are using a computer unsupervised?

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  165. [...] as Books or Education, which is over 25% of the total Apps in store. With an average price of $2.70 (including games), that is a total of $108,000. Let’s be conservative and say that of the 3Bn App [...]

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  166. [...] It wasn’t too long ago that the term “app” conjured up images of fried finger food, not software. But that all changed when Apple introduced its App Store for the iPhone and ushered in the modern day mobile app economy. [...]

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  167. [...] It wasn’t too long ago that the term “app” conjured up images of fried finger food, not software. But that all changed when Apple introduced its App Store for the iPhone and ushered in the modern day mobile app economy. [...]

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  168. We need an app which will port an iPhone app to Android. Because Nexus One and other Android phones are going to take away the market share from Apple. Remember – I said it here first!! – Arunabh Das

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  169. [...] number. First note that it includes the download of paid and free applications. The research group Gigaom has calculated that approximately ¾’s of the applications downloaded from the store are fr… (please, visit that link for a beautiful visualization of this information). Still, the results of [...]

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  170. [...] — more than developers need Ford. The app economy is thriving in the smartphone space — Apple’s App Store generates more than $250 million per month, 70 percent of which goes to developers. So Ford will make it easy for developers to [...]

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  171. [...] — more than developers need Ford. The app economy is thriving in the smartphone space — Apple’s App Store generates more than $250 million per month, 70 percent of which goes to developers. So Ford will make it easy for developers to [...]

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  172. [...] — more than developers need Ford. The app economy is thriving in the smartphone space — Apple’s App Store generates more than $250 million per month, 70 percent of which goes to developers. So Ford will make it easy for developers to [...]

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  173. [...] such as GigaOm, have made “pretty pictures” the foundation of their story as seen in this infographic about the economy of the Apple App Store. To that end, a multimedia library is an essential part of [...]

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  174. [...] any company considering involvement with Palm faces a limited ecosystem for software as compared to larger rivals. As a former Palm Pre owner, webOS was a joy to use, but it never truly gained the attention of [...]

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  175. [...] 280 mill iPhone apps per month Jan 2010 – GigaOm [...]

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  176. [...] that end, different smartphone providers, such as Nokia, are scrambling to compete with the stores of Apple and Google, which are becoming the de-facto standards. I wouldn’t call it coincidental that [...]

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  177. [...] Is the Mobile Pendulum Swinging From Apps to the Web? By Kevin C. Tofel May. 12, 2010, 11:15am PDT No Comments        0 The number of mobile-friendly websites is increasing faster than expected, according to the latest data from Taptu, a touch-focused mobile search company. Not only is the touch web growing, it’s growing at a faster rate than Apple’s iTunes App Store, which currently has an annualized revenue rate of nearly a billion dollars. [...]

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  178. [...] The number of mobile-friendly websites is increasing faster than expected, according to the latest data from Taptu, a touch-focused mobile search company. Not only is the touch web growing, it’s growing at a faster rate than Apple’s iTunes App Store, which currently has an annualized revenue rate of nearly a billion dollars. [...]

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  179. [...] 280 mill iPhone apps per month Jan 2010 GigaOm [...]

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  180. [...] it has also created a successful model replicated by its competitors. why? well, because it works. gigacom has a great pictor-graph depicting the apple app store [...]

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  181. I’m thinking Apple needs to open up the iphone SDK to make it possible to cross compile to iphone from other platforms.

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  182. [...] Unfortunately, it’s taken the company until now to figure this out; in the meantime, nimble rivals have perfected the model — and in Apple’s case, used it to generate a billion dollars in revenue for developers. [...]

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  183. [...] the case that for most developers, iPhone app activities are anything but a money-maker. (Related: The Apple App Store Economy) I recommend the full walkthrough Ahonen provides, but here’s a summary of the [...]

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  184. [...] look at the top 100 grossing applications on each platform points to the money-making opportunities the Apple App Store provides to developers. The average app price for both the iPhone and iPad top grossing apps was almost double that of the [...]

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  185. [...] by iPhone OS users alone, the number of applications in existence and downloaded is quite large. More than 4 applications are downloaded a month of smartphone users. Yet, many of these apps are opened only once or twice [...]

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  186. [...] earning less than they expected. Not every developer on Apple or Google devices is a success story either, but when you combine lagging handset sales and a reactionary smartphone strategy with an [...]

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  187. [...] Jul. 30, 2010, 9:15am PDT No Comments       Is there room in the world for an Apple-like mobile software store comprised of web apps? Teck Chia thinks there is and he just launched the OpenAppMkt to prove it. [...]

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  188. [...] we’ve seen three distinct mobile eras, says Gartner: a past one of devices, the current multi-million dollar app economy era and soon, a service and social era powered by location and connectivity. Helping to take the [...]

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  189. [...] also had Giga Om’s The Apple App Store Economy that provided sales figures for December 2009. This report suggested paid apps represent 25% of all [...]

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  190. Good post and excellent idea. So good, in fact, this is how most mobile software worked before the iPhone! Hobbyists couldn’t penetrate those markets, so only the big companies wrote software for them.
    Thanks Marc…..

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  191. [...] kibosh on free versions of paid apps, Apple puts a hole in the latter theory. Research from Flurry, reported by GigaOM in January, showed that free apps account for three quarters of all iOS App Store downloads, despite making up [...]

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  192. Great idea. So good, in fact, this is how most mobile software worked before the iPhone! Hobbyists couldn’t penetrate those markets, so only the big companies wrote software for them.
    Thanks Daniel..

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  193. [...] have an iOS device, then the answer is you.  On average, early in 2010, iOS users were spending a little over $4 each month on apps. With over 120 million iOS devices sold as of September, and 6.5 billion combined app [...]

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  194. I’d be interested in some details about the methodology used to get the information about the number of paid app of the total number of download. 25% seems to be huge number, I’ve seen other estimates (including my gut feeling) that this ratio is way under 10%.
    Anybody knows why this information is not officially available from Apple – suspicious. If it is 25% really, I am sure they would use it in marketing. Seen a report that with all operational expenses Apple have they just break even with what they charge from those 30% revenue split from paid apps.

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  195. It seams to me that is way more profitable to be iPhone developer than web developer these days.

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  196. Así en enero del 2010 las apps | UPDATED: The Apple App Store Economy — http://t.co/ppQrUqS9

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