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Summary:

  1. Truth

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  2. Proud tablet pc owner

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  3. I notice that even God gave Moses two tablets not slates.

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    1. lol!!!

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  4. Did anyone get their hands on the HP TM2 to see how the inking experience was? I can’t seem to find any reports ANYWHERE online. I’m worried that glassy screen will make for a crappy pen feel.

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    1. HP didn’t have a booth. I tried them at their meeting room but they wouldn’t take me.

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    2. It felt fine for me:

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      1. Thanks so much for this. I’m sold on it.

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    3. Is it much different from the TX2? Only real complaint I have with the TX2 is the stylus – it is too small.

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      1. It should be quite different than TX2 since it’s now Wacom instead of nTrig. One of the great things about using Wacom tech, there are variety of pens available.

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      2. Is the Wacom a “dual digitizer”. One problem I have with the Acer Tablet they gave out at PDC is that it is a single digitizer for both touch and ink – and so when you try to write your hand cause touch events (expecially for us lefties!) Works great for touch, but writing is impossible.

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    4. Inking experience is good on the tm2. It is a “real” tablet pc.

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      1. But he TX2 is a tad too heavy to carry around (not that “portable”), don’t you think?

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      2. It is heavy, so some will find it too heavy.

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    5. Inking on the capacitive screen was just fine – smooth, fluid, responsive; I use a 2730p and have tried every tablet ever produced (lucky me!) and I was very impressed.

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  5. are all us (few?) handwriting folks weird, mad or what. How come the lack of attention to good handwriting all about?

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  6. I’ve resurrected my TC1100 and put W7 on it, OneNote, instead of eBaying it like I was planning to do. I couldn’t be happier, and am so glad I didn’t get rid of it (wondering WTH I was thinking). As old as that thing is – the design is still unparalleled IMO. Tablets rock!

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    1. I had a Fujitsu for testing at about the same time. It was nice and Tablet Planner was very cool in its first incarnation, but off to Ebay it did go. As a Mac user, I need a Mac Tablet…

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      1. @Nicholas – I struggled with the same as a hard core Mac user myself. A Macbook is my primary machine. However, the tablet has becomes an awesome, and very complimentary cross-platform device. I centralize everything in Evernote (yet I also use OneNote on the tablet, then import notes over to Evernote). So, the tablet becomes a handwriting input device for all of my notes, a bedside and family room ereader (Kindle, B&N, Google Reader, etc), browser (Chrome is awesome here), etc. I also use Dropbox across all devices so I can call up a doc on the Tablet if I need to. Everything is pretty web centric and in sync – so I dont really store much of anything on the Tablet, and there are no compatibility issues since we are talking web services. So, I’ve found a very happy mixed platform existence across my HP TC1100 W7 Tablet PC slate, iMac, Macbook and iPhone.

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  7. CES 2010 Slate = UMPC hardware as Microsoft intended (I don’t think they “intended” UMPCs to not run Windows ;-)

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  8. The first of the “new” slates, the Archos 9, can’t handwrite either. I thought I could upgrade it from starter and ink away as I did on my p1610, but it is not to be. No one seems to think handwriting is important anymore. Sigh.

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    1. i suspect the archos 9 is some kind of experiment in merging the pmp with atom, and a larger screen.

      that is, archos have aimed it at the pmp market, not the productivity market. Its a product that can do media, web and maybe the odd facebook flash game, not take notes during a meeting or anything like that.

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  9. Can do *what*, exactly? Allow you to scribble on the screen? I think I saw video demos of both the Notion Ink Adam and the Entourage eDGe in which users were writing on the screen (the former with a finger, to be sure, but definitely writing). Or did you mean “accept and interpret handwriting input in text fields”? That may be true, but I think it’s also an open question whether the target audience for these devices *wants* that feature – they seem to be aimed at users who are not traditional tablet users, who are accustomed to the smartphone virtual-keyboard experience, and who are viewing the slate primarily as a means for consuming multimedia content rather than as a tool for productivity. In that context, leaving the handwriting recognition out might make sense.

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    1. +1 on this. About the only product that seemed aimed at productivity was the edge, as they clearly stated they started out looking at the education market, then found that similar products where wanted in medical and other areas.

      the screens are there to tap the odd facebook link, not to pen a letter, note or novel…

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