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Summary:

As nice as Windows 7 is to use let’s face it — we always want total control over the computing environment. What we really want is to have total control in an easy-to-use form that puts everything at our fingertips. Enter the super secret Windows 7 […]

Win7 God Mode

As nice as Windows 7 is to use let’s face it — we always want total control over the computing environment. What we really want is to have total control in an easy-to-use form that puts everything at our fingertips. Enter the super secret Windows 7 God Mode.

God Mode is a simple folder that brings all aspects of Windows 7 control in a single place. It collects all of the Control Panel functions, interface customization, accessibility options, just about every aspect of controlling Windows 7 into a single place.

God Mode is easy to set up too, just do this:

  • Create a new folder anywhere.
  • Rename the folder by pasting this name exactly as it appears (copy it first):
  • GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

That’s it, you now have a folder with the Control Panel icon (pictured above) that has all the controls in one place:

(Windows 7 Themes via Dwight Silverman on Twitter)

  1. Great info.

    On a completely unrelated note. I have a Lenovo T61p with a 9-cell battery and I have never seen it go above 2:30 in the battery icon. All the more I am looking at a MBP. How in the world are you getting such great power?

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    1. you have a bad battery? I have a Lenovo x61t with an 8-cell battery that lands an easy 6-7 hours of battery life doing everyday things. This summer though (I had had the laptop for 2 years) the battery started getting 2-3 hours a charge then finally died. Bought a new battery and I am back to the 6-7 hours I am used to.

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  2. I must not have good luck with batteries then. The notebook is about 14 months old, it came with the 6-cell which suffered the dreaded battery issue on recall, but Lenovo never replaced it so I bought a 9-cell in August. When I first got it I mustered about 3 hours, but that soon dropped to 2:30. I have even used the ‘battery maintenance’ app as recommended by Lenovo support.

    Thanks for the insight. Looks like I should have taken them up on the 25% off accessories during the holiday. D’oh! What luck.

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  3. I get 6-7 hours easily with the x200, on both 8-cell batteries.

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    1. Seconded, on my x200 tablet with an 8 cell battery I get 5-6 hrs of wifi and bluetooth on with the brightness turned up.

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      1. Lenovo has known issues with their batteries. At our Company the T60 and T61 series laptops have averaged about 14 months of lifetime in which case Lenovo will not replace them under warrantee. These bad batteries may also lock up the laptop from time to time becasue of the microchip that planted in them.

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  4. This is awesome. The question is, why doesn’t MS enable this to begin with? I guess I don’t understand why certain aspects of operating systems and software are hidden until “unlocked”, especially the ones that have the greatest utility. Sort of annoying.

    Thanks for this tip though, I will be hooking this up tonight.

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    1. turn.self.off Sunday, January 3, 2010

      simple, they need to have a ace up their sleeve that they can “teach” during their certifications…

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      1. they don’t “teach” this in their certifications, it’s a developers feature. used while developing the os so they can have access to all control panel applets in one place.

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  5. it crashed (repeatedly) my explorer, just as a comparable trick in win Vista did years ago….

    Tom

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  6. It was discoverd in Windows Vista called Master Control Panel… When I didn’t have blog….and posted on various Windows Forums.

    For any crashes, here is solution – http://bit.ly/5Klxj4

    Windows 7 GodMode : Old wine in new bottle. – http://bit.ly/5r3iGM

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  7. Personally, I find it easier to just type what I want to do into the start menu anyway instead of having to sift through all of these choices, but that’s just me.

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    1. Yep, virtually the only way I interact with Windows since Vista. Type first couple of letters of what you want and up it pops!

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  8. More importantly, how do I then disable a user from accessing “God Mode?” What GPO or registry settings do I need to keep my students from finding new things they can mess up on workstations.

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    1. This doesn’t add any functionality to limited users, it’s more a grouping of disparate Windows 7 options. If the functionality isn’t available normally, through group policies to a user, it will remain so.

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  9. Really, really great. Thaaank you!

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  10. I must add, don’t try this hack if you don’t have Windows 7. (doh)

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