3 Comments

Summary:

Gary Hoenig is vice president and general manager of ESPN (NYSE: DIS) Publishing, which includes ESPN The Magazine and ESPN Insider.

We li…

Gary Hoenig

Gary Hoenig is vice president and general manager of ESPN (NYSE: DIS) Publishing, which includes ESPN The Magazine and ESPN Insider.

We live in interesting times, to paraphrase the Chinese proverb. And when I say “we,” I mean those of us in so-called old media, the kind tied up in ink and paper and trucks and big manufacturing plants; artifacts, in the minds of many, of an age gone by. But out of desperation comes invention, to paraphrase still another old saw, and there is no absence of ideas out there hoping to provide the cure for what ails us.

One of the latest: “Hulu for magazines”

You’re subscribed! If you like, you can update your settings

  1. I’m not sure they are moving in the right direction here. While I prefer digital reading for many formats (books, news) I still prefer magazines in print form. The glossy ads, the smell of the perfume samples…I will be sad if it doesn’t exist in the future.

  2. Gary,

    Thanks for this. I’ve made similar arguments (although using different points) in my blog.

    One thing that should be pointed out is that some publishers (including ESPN) are adapting online very well. The Atlantic has proven to be very innovative and Conde Nast has made great strides in their digital business (although, they were absolutely horrible as recently as a year ago).

    Again, thanks for a great article.

    – Greg

  3. This is a great article. I too love traditional magazines, but magazines pile up. That’s the main reason I don’t subscribe to more – it wll become a mess. As Jessica points out above, not all magazines are the same, i.e., readers of VOGUE may not go for this, but readers of the Atlantic, New Yorker, and the Family Handyman will eat it up. If I can get 5 digital titles a month for a nominal monthly fee, then a Kindle suddenly doesn’t seem like such a silly idea. How many times have you thought of a magazine article you read, with no hope of ever being able to dig it up? How many New Yorkers can one save? The added benefit of organizing my magazines and my life has real revenue potential that simply isn’t there with books.

Comments have been disabled for this post