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Summary:

The Russian visual search site Quintura has been awarded a patent for a way to display search results that it claims a minor feature of Google infringes. CEO Yakov Sadchikov said Quintura plans to enforce the patent and is working with its lawyers to approach Google.

The Russian visual search provider Quintura has been awarded a patent for a way to display search results that it claims a minor feature of Google’s search function infringes. Quintura’s eighth U.S. patent, awarded Dec. 1, covers the mapping of related concepts to a search query in a visual interface that reflects the relation between topics. Quintura CEO Yakov Sadchikov said his company plans to enforce the patent and is working with its lawyers to approach Google.

Google introduced an experimental feature back in May called Wonder Wheel that arranges related queries in a circle around a search term. When a user clicks, the display animates the shift to a new term and its related queries. Wonder Wheel is available for any search term but it’s somewhat hard to find; users must click on “show options” on a search results page and then pick it as a viewing option at the bottom of the page.

Quntura, founded in 2005, providers site search for some 4,500 online publishers for a subscription fee. Google has not yet replied to a request for comment on the matter. Update: Google said it had no comment. Do you think Google infringes? Do you think this concept should be patentable? Read the patent here and compare the images below yourself.

  1. Not seeing this covered anywhere else, can you mention a source?

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    1. We talked to the company and did the reporting. I know how old fashioned :-)

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      1. Journalism — and a scoop no less. Nice work.

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  2. I think both of these could face trouble with the original Mind Mapping people from many years ago..

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    1. Bastian Nutzinger Friday, December 11, 2009

      yeah. If anybody has a right to this patent its the guy who invented the mindmap.
      Besides the represantation quintura choose to display the relation of theese words more closely resembles a tag cloud then a mindmap so they aren´t even visually comparable.
      So what exactly is the patent they are claiming? Do they own the right to showing the relationship between a set of data independent of the visual represantation?

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      1. Are you guys talking about ThinkMap / Visual Thesaurus? If so I’m with you. If you look at the patent it is kind of amazing that it was awarded.

        If not, what is “Mind Mapping” as regards search?

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  3. [...] en Gigaom Si te gusto, comparteme These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and [...]

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  4. The visual representation shouldn’t be patentable, the underlying algorithms/heuristics/AI that determine the relation between topics maybe. Agree this looks a lot like mind mapping visually.

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