1 Comment

Summary:

After lamenting the lack of mind mapping applications for the iPhone, recent weeks have seen the launch of MindJet for iPhone, MindMeister and latterly, the iPhone/iPod touch edition of another mind mapping app we’ve covered previously, Markus Müller’s MindNode. MindNode (touch) shares the simplicity and elegance […]

After lamenting the lack of mind mapping applications for the iPhone, recent weeks have seen the launch of MindJet for iPhone, MindMeister and latterly, the iPhone/iPod touch edition of another mind mapping app we’ve covered previously, Markus Müller’s MindNode.

MindNode (touch) shares the simplicity and elegance of the desktop version, leading to an effortless but powerful user experience.

The app can stand alone from its desktop counterpart, matching it feature-for-feature and providing a productive mobile working environment. Maps can be created and edited fully on the device and imported and exported between various open formats. The iPhone’s standard search, cut & paste and landscape modes are all supported.

Gestures and Mindmaps

Prior to release, my conversations with Müller revealed the attention with which he’d considered translating the desktop edition’s drag-and-drop interface into intuitive gestures for a touchscreen device. Fortunately, he succeeded: new nodes are created by simply dragging them out of a “node well;” existing nodes can be dragged and dropped with one finger. iPhone’s regular “pinch-to-zoom” gestures are also supported, providing an extraordinarily large canvas upon which to work, though Müller recommends limiting the number of nodes to 150, given the restricted memory available to iPhone apps.

Synchronizing Mindnode Pro & MindNode touch

Previously created maps can be synchronized with the desktop edition of MindNode Pro, allowing users to adapt the app to their preferred device and workflow. Curiously, synchronization isn’t executed using iSync or iTunes, but a proprietary solution.

Good Enough to Capture Ideas On the Move?

For me the real test of a mobile mind-mapping app is the ability for me to take notes and capture ideas in map form and then edit or expand using a desktop client. In this regard, MindNode (touch) and MindNode Pro work together flawlessly and the mobile edition is certainly value-for-money.

MindNode touch is currently available at the iTunes App store for £4.99 (around $8). Purchasing it also unlocks a 20 percent discount on the desktop edition, bringing it down to $12.

Find out more at the MindNode web site, where you can also watch a brief screencast.

Do you use a mobile mind mapping tool? If so, which one?

  1. The availability of mindmapping software for the iPhone proved to be the incentive for me. I use MindJet’s MindManager for iPhone, the Windows version, and more recently their online version, Catalyst.

    All 3 have a place in my work & workflows & they have been invaluable as a consultant in working with clients.

    I can work a map on the iPhone, update it further on my laptop or desktop, and upload & share it on catalyst..even hold a multiple-user session online to update it further..together.

    The ability to use the tools together is what sold me on MindManager.

    Paul

    Share

Comments have been disabled for this post