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Summary:

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how people behave in different environments. It first crossed my mind a month or so ago, while out shopping with one of my sisters. She was driving, someone cut her off, and she commented on the person’s rude behavior. […]

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how people behave in different environments. It first crossed my mind a month or so ago, while out shopping with one of my sisters. She was driving, someone cut her off, and she commented on the person’s rude behavior. I said that I wondered if the person would act the same in person.

I act quite differently in my car than I do when I meet strangers in a store. I’m much more likely to be aggressive while driving, whereas in a store, I’m generally very courteous and tend to go out of my way to hold doors open for people, and that sort of thing.

It’s strange, really. I’m “in a rush” when I’m on the road and don’t have time for niceties, but after parking my car and walking into a store five minutes later, I can take the time to be polite. It made me wonder if medium influences behavior.

I was talking recently with another entrepreneur about how people can be rude and even intentionally hurtful when posting comments online. We wondered if those same people would act differently in person. We agreed that the Internet has a tendency to evoke rudeness where it otherwise wouldn’t exist. For example, I came across a Twitter reply a few days ago that, while not necessarily overtly rude, seemed snippy and maybe a little arrogant. It gave me a bad first impression of the company and its team, something that is now hard for them to repair.

All of these instances made me realize how important it is to be polite and courteous in every environment. A simple tweet or blog comment might very well damage a reputation that you’ve worked hard to establish, when all that was really needed was a little consideration for another person.

How observant are you about how you behave in different environments? If you knew your customers could see you, would you act the same?

Image from Flickr by Jacob Bøtter

  1. See: http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2004/03/19/

    (note: this cartoon uses words that some people may find offensive – but I think it makes the point well).

    1. That is the exact thing I thought of when reading this post. Unfortunately, it’s just as true now as it was then.

  2. I’m virtually two different people when I’m living/working in Hong Kong vs. visiting family back in Canada. To put things in perspective, in Hong Kong getting run into or bumped into is an every day, every hour occurrence… in reality you can’t apologize every single time even if you’re not in the wrong.

  3. Amber, you’re right something strange does seem to happen to a lot of people when they get behind the wheel. Some people act quite differently. But at the same time, I think some people show their true colours on the road. I have noticed that it’s often the same types of car which cut me up and barge around. Big cars driven by pushy types who’ve probably got where they are in business with this sort of arrogant attitude.
    Haven’t had a problem with Twitter though – in the year I’ve been active I don’t think I’ve seen anything remotely like what I used to see on forums – which I rarely seem to visit any more, wonder why?

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